4 Books for Growing Food in Winter

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Don’t let cold weather stop you from producing and enjoying your own food.

For many, the coming of winter simply means cultivation moves indoors or under cover. Small farmers, homesteaders, home gardeners, and commercial growers can extend the growing season with techniques outlined in these essential books. There’s no need for urbanites and small-space dwellers to feel left out–you, too can celebrate a winter harvest by growing salad greens indoors all year round.

 

 “Our goal was to find the lowest tech and most economical way to extend fresh-vegetable harvest through the winter months.” -Eliot Coleman

 

Four-Season Harvest by Eliot Coleman
Did you know that most of the United States gets more winter sunshine than the south of France? This book will teach you how to harness it with cold frames and plastic-covered tunnel greenhouses (without supplementary heat). With advice from one of America’s leading organic farming experts, you’ll soon be feasting on fresh produce from your own garden all through the winter.

 

The Winter Harvest Handbook by Eliot Coleman
Describing techniques perfected over more than 20 years of managing the world-famous Four Season Farm, this is the definitive guide to growing produce of unparalleled freshness and quality in customized unheated or minimally heated, movable plastic greenhouses. Enjoy the fruits of your labor all year round, or turn a profit with Coleman’s tips and wisdom on greenhouse construction and maintenance, planting schedules, crop management, harvesting, and even marketing methods.

Year-Round Indoor Salad Gardening by Peter Burke
Peter Burke was tired of the growing season ending with the first frost, yet also wanted a simpler way to grow greens indoors. Luckily for us, he discovered a solution. After much research and diligent experimenting, he created a clear-cut, foolproof method for growing healthy greens indoors in less than 10 days—without special grow lamps or equipment. The secret? Soil sprouts. This book is perfect for you if you live in a small space or you’re looking to extend your growing season without a lot of fuss.
See a list of author Peter Burke’s upcoming events.

FORTHCOMING:
The Greenhouse and Hoophouse Grower’s Handbook by Andrew Mefferd
Today only a few dozen large-scale producers dominate the greenhouse produce market. Not anymore! This book levels the playing field by revealing the best practices used by these market giants to cultivate the eight most profitable crops so that all growers—large and small—can maximize the potential of their protected growing space. Whether you’re using a heated greenhouse or unheated hoophouse, this book offers a decision-making framework for managing crops that goes beyond a list of simple do’s and don’ts. Preorder now.

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