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5 Common Invasive Species and How to Manage Them

BeyondtheWar

Last week, we asked authors Tao Orion and Katrina Blair to share alternative approaches to managing five different plant species commonly held to be “invasive.” St. John’s Wort, Garlic Mustard, Thistle, Oxeye Daisy, and Kudzu are often dismissed as annoyances at best and the target of aggressive eradication with harmful chemicals at worst. Orion and Blair, however, hold a different view of these plants. Backed by years of experience with plant and wildlife, they share ways in which each of these species may be used for food and medicine, and how they are part of a greater ecological story.

As Katrina Blair writes, “More and more our mode of thinking about native vs. non-native is flawed and outdated and is clearly no longer serving a holistic model of global earth restoration. It is excessively common for these labeled “non-native” species to be the focus of a negative view and then are subject to herbicides and other eradication techniques. Let’s consider the perspective that all plants serve a greater purpose as nature is intending them to do.”

Take a look through these five plant profiles and check out Beyond the War on Invasive Species and The Wild Wisdom of Weeds for more information.

Too Much St. John’s Wort? Look to the Cows

Too Much St. John’s Wort? Look to the Cows

Garlic Mustard: A Gold Mine of Food and Medicine

Garlic Mustard: A Gold Mine of Food and Medicine


How to Manage Invasive Thistle and Improve Your Soil

How to Manage Invasive Thistle and Improve Your Soil

Oxeye Daisy: A Plant for the Pollinators

Oxeye Daisy: A Plant for the Pollinators


Uncovering the Many Uses for Abundant Kudzu

Uncovering the Many Uses for Abundant Kudzu

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