Free Shipping on Orders Over $100*

Loehr: the cowardice of the pulpit

At the request of UU Word, Boston College professor and political economist Charles Derber sat down and interviewed Davidson Loehr. The interview starts off explaining use of the “F-word,” when Davidson calls literalistic religion the mortal enemy of democracy. So why are so many religions sticking with strict and literalist interpretations of the bible?

“It’s rare that ministers won’t care if they lose their biggest pledgers—who often use their money as a tool to restrict the preacher and the church to stay within their comfort zone. It’s embarrassing to think of how many times these people demean religion in this way—with the all-too-willing compliance of the ministers. It’s human nature, just as it’s natural for ministers to want to be liked…But right now, in the most dangerous time our country has been through in my lifetime, the silence—I want to say, the cowardice—of the pulpits is especially disturbing.”

Loehr uses a Buddhist metaphor that says all religions, priests, and sages are fingers pointing at the moon, and that the object of religion is to see what they are pointing at–not to worship the fingers. Most people would agree that worshipping the fingers would be absurd. In recounting Loehr’s sermon from this past Sunday, Texas Oasis mentioned this quote by Voltaire: “Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.”

Share This:

Recent Articles

A black sign that says community food forest

An Edible Urban Oasis

More than 80 percent of the US population now resides in urban areas. This number is projected to rise in the next few decades. Finding ways to maximize use of existing open space is imperative, and increasing access to food through sustainable management of edible landscaping is one important approach among many that are underway.…

Read More
What is Massive Small?

What is Massive Small?

It’s more than an oxymoron. Massive Small is a framework for urban development that can make cities more sustainable and resilient. But how does it work and does it make sense for the future? The following excerpt is from Making Massive Small Change by Kelvin Campbell. It has been adapted for the web. The Massive Small…

Read More
oil rig

Our History: A Look at Oil, Power, and War

For centuries, humans have had a very strong interest in oil and it’s only getting more intense. Our dependency is reaching a concerning level which Matthieu Auzanneau speaks to in his book Oil, Power, and War. The following article was written by Frank Kaminski and was published on Resilience.org. In Oil, Power, and War, French…

Read More
massive small

Making Massive Small Change

For generations, we’ve worked collectively as a society to build our cities into vibrant communities where we can progress and flourish together. Over the years, however, we’ve lost the art of collective and community evolution as our governments step in with their big ideas for urban growth – many of which come at a steep…

Read More
oil rigs

Our Complicated History with Oil, Power, and War

When we reflect on the history of the world and the progress of human society, it’s incredible to think about where we started and where we are today. We’ve innovated, we’ve discovered, we’ve grown, we’ve developed. But at what cost? The following is an excerpt from Oil, Power, and War by Matthieu Auzanneau. It has been…

Read More