Manhunt heats up in Bridgehampton

After resolving to hunt Warren Anderson down, Diane Wilson faced several tactical problems. The disparity between her own financial resources and those of her adversary put Diane at a significant disadvantage. How could she hope to track Warren down, when nobody could tell her whether he was at home in the Hamptons, or vacationing in Vero Beach?

Never one to be deterred in the face of an unlikely victory, Diane traveled to Bridgehampton yesterday with embedded journalists Leslie and Michael in tow. Before heading out to Long Island, Diane had the opportunity to speak at several colleges and community events in upstate New York, where she found some promising leads and resources for her manhunt. One student suggested she contact television’s Mad Dog Hogan, who might be able to help her track Warren down.

When she arrived in Bridgehampton, Diane spent a short amount of time reflecting on her last visit to Warren’s house, which happened in 2002 and ended with an unfortunate scuffle between Warren and a broadcast journalist. No doubt the reconstructed dangers associated with covering Diane’s manhunt made her current entourage grateful for the security of their official embedded status.

After determining that Warren was not home, Diane took a moment to write him a short note. She then moved on the Shinicock Hills Golf Club, an apparently Private oasis where Warren frequently plays the links. While the November rain had clearly deterred all but the hardiest golfers, Diane thought she would check inside the club’s Public House, and ask to leave a card for Warren. Sadly, her efforts were thwarted by a simple topographical misunderstanding: it seems that in this case the public house rested on very private land, and Diane was forced to retreat.

Now in the company of fishermen on the West coast, Diane will be working to get a hold of Mad Dog, and planning the next move of her manhunt. Meanwhile, thanks to all the kind and unreasonable people who have helped her Northeast operations. Updates on the manhunt are being kept at Corporate Watchdog Media.


Diane solicits advice on bounty hunting from students at RPI and the Yes Men’s Mike Bonano


Diane arrives at Warren’s house, only to find that he is not home. Undeterred, she leaves a note and continues her search at the Shinticock Hills Golf Club, another known hotbed of ex-CEO activity.


Diane indulges the manhunt’s embedded reporters outside of Warren’s yard.


The resident unreasonable woman, Diane addresses a crowd at the Sanctuary for Independent Media in Troy, New York.

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