Chelsea Green Publishing

Slow Wine 2016

Pages:256 pages
Size: 5.5 x 9 inch
Publisher:Slow Food Editore
Paperback: 9788884994059
Pub. Date February 17, 2016

Slow Wine 2016

A Year in the Life of Italy’s Vineyards and Wines

Categories:
Food & Drink, Travel

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
February 17, 2016

$25.00

300 cellars visited, 2,500 wines reviewed           

An innovative overview of the Italian wine world, which lists the country’s finest bottles in terms of aroma and taste, sense of terroir, and value for the money.

For the fifth consecutive year, Slow Food International offers an English-language edition of its unique guide to Italian wines whose qualities extend well beyond the palate. Drawing upon visits to more than 300 cellars, the 2500 wine reviews in Slow Wine 2016 describe not only what’s in the glass, but also what’s behind it: the work, aims, and passion of producers; their bond with the land; and their choice of cultivation and cellar techniques—favoring the ones who implement ecologically sustainable winegrowing and winemaking practices. An essential guide for wine lovers and armchair oenophiles and better still for those who get out of that chair once in a while: over half the producers listed will offer a discount of at least 10 percent to anyone who visits them with a copy of Slow Wine 2016 in hand.

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