Chelsea Green Publishing

The Slow Food Dictionary to Italian Regional Cooking

Pages:576 pages
Book Art:40 pages of color illustrations
Size: 5.75 x 8.25 inch
Publisher:Slow Food Editore
Paperback: 9788884992406
Pub. Date December 20, 2010

The Slow Food Dictionary to Italian Regional Cooking

Edited by Slow Food Editore and Paola Gho
Adapted by John Irving

Categories:
Food & Drink, Travel

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
December 20, 2010

$34.95 $26.21

The handy and practical Slow Food Dictionary of Regional Italian Cooking by the editors at Slow Food International tells you everything you ever wanted to know about Italian regional cooking as prepared in homes, osterias, and restaurants. Packed with information about dishes and ingredients, tools and techniques, origins and trends, the book (which contains forty color illustrations) is aimed primarily at food lovers but will also be of interest to anyone curious to find out more about Italy in general, its people, its language, its history, and its culture.

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