Chelsea Green Publishing

The Permaculture Kitchen

Pages:176 pages
Book Art:Full-color illustrations throughout
Size: 6.75 x 9.5 inch
Publisher:Permanent Publications
Paperback: 9781856231534
Pub. Date June 01, 2014

The Permaculture Kitchen

Love Food, Love People, Love the Planet

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
June 01, 2014

$22.95 $17.21

This is the ultimate introduction to economical, seasonal, and delicious cooking. The Permaculture Kitchen is written by a passionate smallholder and cook who explains how to make tasty meals using seasonal, foraged, homegrown, local, fresh, and free-range produce, including meat, and sustainably caught fish. This is a cookbook for gardeners who love to eat their own produce, and for people who enjoy a weekly veggie box, or supporting their local farmers’ market.

There are ideas here for developing recipes “on the fly” and recipes for meals that can be easily cooked in thirty minutes or less, with additional tips on how to make further dishes from leftovers. Learn how to make stocks, soups, sauces, pizzas, curries, grills, pilafs and paellas, gourmet salads, preserves, and more!

Most recipes include plenty of ideas for using a variety of different ingredients, which can be included or substituted as desired, or when available. There are also vegetarian recipes, and vegetarian and vegan alternatives to meat dishes.

The author, Carl Legge, is a passionate advocate of good food with a low carbon footprint and this book is his first in a series about low impact, local and seasonal gourmet food.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Carl Legge

Carl Legge lives with his wife and son on a three-acre smallholding on the rural Llŷn Peninsula in North Wales. In 1997 he resigned from a well-paid corporate job to focus on the smallholding. They grow fruit and vegetables in raised beds, polytunnels, and forest garden areas, and keep chickens. What was subsidized sheep pasture is now a thriving nature reserve which provides Carl and his family with a large proportion of their own food.

Carl is a gourmet cook and blogs regularly at http://www.carllegge.com.

CONNECT WITH THIS AUTHOR

Carl's Website

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