Chelsea Green Publishing

Slow Wine 2015

Pages:256 pages
Size: 5.5 x 9 inch
Publisher:Slow Food Editore
Paperback: 9788884993700
Pub. Date February 25, 2015

Slow Wine 2015

A Year in the Life of Italy’s Vineyards and Wines

Categories:
Food & Drink, Travel

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
February 25, 2015

$25.00 $18.75

350 cellars visited, 3,000 wines reviewed

For the fourth consecutive year, Slow Food International offers an English-language edition of their guide to Italian wines whose qualities extend well beyond the palate. Slow Wine 2015 doesn’t simply select and review Italy’s finest bottles. With visits to 350 cellars, its 3000 wine reviews describe not only what’s in the glass, but also what’s behind it: namely the work, the aims, and the passion of producers; their bond with the land; and their choice of cultivation and cellar techniques—favoring the ones who implement ecologically sustainable winegrowing and winemaking practices. An essential guide for armchair oenophiles and better still for those who get out of that chair once in a while: over half the producers listed will offer a discount of at least 10 percent to anyone who visits them with a copy of Slow Wine in hand.

        

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