Chelsea Green Publishing

Slow Gardening

Pages:232 pages
Book Art:Color photos throughout, maps
Size: 7 x 10 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781603582674
Pub. Date June 27, 2011

Slow Gardening

A No-Stress Philosophy for All Senses and All Seasons

By Felder Rushing
Foreword by Roger B. Swain

Farm & Garden

Availability: In Stock


Available Date:
June 27, 2011


Thanks to the resurgence of home and community gardening, more and more people are discovering the pleasure of biting into a sun-ripened tomato picked right off the vine, the earthy smell of freshly turned soil, and the cheerful harbingers of spring such as daffodils, irises, and pansies. But they are also discovering that gardening can be a heck of a lot of work. So what happens when keeping up with the weeds turns into a full-time job? What do you do when gardening becomes stressful?

Slow Gardening to the rescue! Inspired by Slow Food, an international movement that promotes local food systems and biological and cultural diversity, the slow-gardening approach can help us all appreciate and enjoy our gardens more, year in and year out.Felder Rushing, a well-known and truly one-of-a-kind garden expert, offers this practical yet philosophical approach to gardening - one that will help you slow down, take stock of your yard, and follow your own creative whimsy in the garden.

Slow Gardening will inspire you to slip into the rhythm of the seasons, take it easy, and get more enjoyment out of your garden, all at the same time.


"Felder knows that if gardening isn't fun, it isn't worth doing. So if 'power gardening' has emptied your wallet and sent your blood pressure soaring like a condor on caffeine, give yourself a break. Try Slow Gardening."--Steve Bender, Southern Living Magazine

"Felder's enjoyment-based approach, which is what I do and teach but didn't have a name for til now, is sustainable gardening at its most enjoyable-without the usual anxiety over doing something wrong."--Susan Harris, cofounder, GardenRant and founder, Sustainable-Gardening

"Slow Gardening is a delight-a welcome stress-free approach, refreshing in its simplicity and firmly placing the gardener in their own space, at their own pace."--Sandy Felton, Reckless Gardener UK

"Between the covers of Slow Gardening, Felder mixes his famous Southern wit and wisdom with hard science. Leave it to Felder to come up with the 'slow' theme that entices beginning and intermediate gardeners to get their hands into the dirt in a variety of unique ways."--Rosalind Creasy, author, Edible Landscaping and member, Garden Writers Association Hall of Fame

Kirkus Reviews-
Achieve gardening nirvana by employing basic principles and a don't-worry-be-happy attitude.All too often, gardeners make the mistake of becoming preoccupied with what the neighbors might think instead of designing gardens for their own pleasure. Rushing (Tough Plants for Southern Gardens, 2003, etc.) cautions gardeners against falling into this trap; plant perfection, he writes, especially cosmetic perfection, is not obtainable-so why even try? If something doesn't work out, just throw it in the compost pile and plant something else. It is this attitude that sets this book apart from other gardening how-to books. Embracing the author's gardening philosophy will allow readers to savor their time out in the dirt. Rushing's bit-by-bit approach is likely to encourage gardeners of all enthusiasm levels. The author includes enlightened strategies gardeners should practice in order to achieve optimal results, including tips for how to make their own compost-or at least keep a pile of leaves that will eventually turn into compost. He suggests reducing the size of the lawn and several varieties of low-maintenance plants. As for pests? Avoid the pesticides and opt for pest-resistant plants instead. When it comes to fertilizer, Rushing advises for quality over quantity.The author's slow and natural approach should strike a chord with those who are tired of quick-fix alternatives in the backyard.

Publishers Weekly-
Though the title suggests that this will be a guide to low-maintenance, low-anxiety gardening, garden lecturer and author Rushing (Passalong Plants) invites gardeners to make enjoyment and creative expression central to the gardening experience. Whether one loves strict formality or careless chaos, Rushing delightfully urges gardeners to follow their own bliss in the garden. Marigolds in military lines, flocks of lawn flamingos, and homemade art are as welcome as boxwood parterres and immaculate lawns. Rushing is a horticultural inspirational speaker who offers solid advice along with encouragement. Beginning gardeners will benefit from his hard-won tricks of the trade, proven plant combinations, and easy maintenance plans. The more experienced will appreciate his tips on making compost, propagating plants, and engaging all the senses in the garden. All will find some inspiration in his infectious enthusiasm and good humor. 126 color photos.


Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing is a tenth-generation American gardener, raised into his teen years under the apprenticeship of a horticulturist great-grandmother who grew flowers, vegetables, herbs, and fruits without a hose or pesticides, and a garden club grandmother who garnered hundreds of blue ribbons for her plant breeding and displays. He is a longtime national director of the Garden Writers Association, member of the National Youth Gardening Committee, past president of several horticulture societies, and board member of the American Horticultural Society. He delivers more than eighty lectures each year and is the author of several books including Passalong Plants, Tough Plants for Southern Gardens, Slow Gardening, and Gardening Southern Style.




By Mary Appelhof and Caton Gauthier

Wormania! offers kids a rare opportunity to view exciting images of live worms at work, and demonstrates how anatomy and physiology can be taught without having to dissect the worm. See a nightcrawler drag a leaf across the ground, the rhythmic beating of a worm's five pairs of hearts, and a baby worm hatching from its cocoon.

Songwriter and entertainer Billy B. Brennan and the Brennan kids, Julian, Shannon, and James make this a fast-paced, educational, and entertaining video.

Available in: VHS video

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Mary Appelhof, Caton Gauthier

VHS video $34.90

You Can Farm

You Can Farm

By Joel Salatin

Have you ever desired, deep within your soul, to make a comfortable full-time living from a farming enterprise? Too often people dare not even vocalize this desire because it seems absurd. It's like thinking the unthinkable.

After all, the farm population is dwindling. It takes too much capital to start. The pay is too low. The working conditions are dusty, smelly and noisy: not the place to raise a family. This is all true, and more, for most farmers.

But for farm entrepreneurs, the opportunities for a farm family business have never been greater. The aging farm population is creating cavernous niches begging to be filled by creative visionaries who will go in dynamic new directions. As the industrial agriculture complex crumbles and our culture clambers for clean food, the countryside beckons anew with profitable farming opportunities.

While this book can be helpful to all farmers, it targets the wannabes, the folks who actually entertain notions of living, loving and learning on a piece of land. Anyone willing to dance with such a dream should be able to assess its assets and liabilities; its fantasies and realities. "Is it really possible for me?" is the burning question this book addresses.

Available in: Paperback

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You Can Farm

Joel Salatin

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The Raw Milk Revolution

The Raw Milk Revolution

By David E. Gumpert

Beginning in 2006, the agriculture departments of several large states-with backing from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-launched a major crackdown on small dairies producing raw milk. Replete with undercover agents, sting operations, surprise raids, questionable test-lab results, mysterious illnesses, propaganda blitzes, and grand jury investigations, the crackdown was designed to disrupt the supply of unpasteurized milk to growing legions of consumers demanding healthier and more flavorful food.

The Raw Milk Revolution takes readers behind the scenes of the government's tough and occasionally brutal intimidation tactics, as seen through the eyes of milk producers, government regulators, scientists, prosecutors, and consumers. It is a disturbing story involving marginally legal police tactics and investigation techniques, with young children used as political pawns in a highly charged atmosphere of fear and retribution.

Are regulators' claims that raw milk poses a public health threat legitimate? That turns out to be a matter of considerable debate. In assessing the threat, The Raw Milk Revolution reveals that the government's campaign, ostensibly designed to protect consumers from pathogens like salmonella, E. coli 0157:H7, and listeria, was based in a number of cases on suspect laboratory findings and illnesses attributed to raw milk that could well have had other causes, including, in some cases, pasteurized milk.

David Gumpert dares to ask whether regulators have the public's interest in mind or the economic interests of dairy conglomerates. He assesses how the government's anti-raw-milk campaign fits into a troublesome pattern of expanding government efforts to sanitize the food supply-even in the face of ever-increasing rates of chronic disease like asthma, diabetes, and allergies. The Raw Milk Revolution provides an unsettling view of the future, in which nutritionally dense foods may be available largely through underground channels.

Available in: Paperback, eBook

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The Raw Milk Revolution

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Growing, Older

Growing, Older

By Joan Dye Gussow

Michael Pollan calls her one of his food heroes. Barbara Kingsolver credits her with shaping the history and politics of food in the United States. And countless others who have vied for a food revolution, pushed organics, and reawakened Americans to growing their own food and eating locally consider her both teacher and muse.Joan Gussow has influenced thousands through her books, This Organic Life and The Feeding Web, her lectures, and the simple fact that she lives what she preaches. Now in her eighties, she stops once more to pass along some wisdom-surprising, inspiring, and controversial-via the pen.

Gussow's memoir Growing, Older begins when she loses her husband of 40 years to cancer and, two weeks later, finds herself skipping down the street-much to her alarm. Why wasn't she grieving in all the normal ways? With humor and wit, she explains how she stopped worrying about why she was smiling and went on worrying, instead, and as she always has, about the possibility that the world around her was headed off a cliff. But hers is not a tale, or message, of gloom. Rather it is an affirmation of a life's work-and work in general.

Lacking a partner's assistance, Gussow continued the hard labor of growing her own year-round diet. She dealt single-handedly with a rising tidal river that regularly drowned her garden, with muskrat interlopers, broken appliances, bodily decay, and river trash-all the while bucking popular notions of how "an elderly widowed woman" ought to behave.

Scattered throughout are urgent suggestions about what growing older on a changing planet will call on all of us to do: learn self-reliance and self-restraint, yield graciously if not always happily to necessity, and-since there is no other choice-come to terms with the insistencies of the natural world. Gussow delivers another literary gem-one that women curious about aging, gardeners curious about contending with increasingly intense weather, or environmentalists curious about the future will embrace.

Available in: Paperback, eBook

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Growing, Older

Joan Dye Gussow

Paperback $17.95