Chelsea Green Publishing

Edible Cities

Pages:176 pages
Book Art:Full-color illustrations throughout
Size: 6.75 x 8.75 inch
Publisher:Permanent Publications
Paperback: 9781856231374
Pub. Date December 15, 2013

Edible Cities

Urban Permaculture for Gardens, Balconies, Rooftops, and Beyond

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
December 15, 2013

$22.95

Want to grow food but have nothing larger than a balcony, windowsill, or a piece of wall? No problem! This is a gardening book with a difference. It will help you to grow your own fruit, vegetables, herbs, and even mushrooms in small spaces in the most ecological way possible. Edible Cities shows you why the urban landscape can be a great place for permaculture. Discover inside:

• Principles of permaculture

• Worldwide examples of urban gardening projects

• Ideas for flats and balconies

• Green roofs

• Vertical gardening and urban beekeeping

• Guerrilla gardening and successful community projects

• Illustrated practical techniques with clear instructions

• Preface and contributions by Sepp Holzer

• Urban case studies from cities all over the world.

Packed with inspiration and practical, fully illustrated ideas, discover how people around the world are inventing new growing opportunities and making them a reality with few resources and a lot of creativity. Find out how you, too, can plan and create your own urban growing paradise.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Judith Anger

Judith Anger is a freelance events promoter in Vienna. In 2011, she started the PermaVitae organization to develop permaculture training.

Immo Fiebrig

Dr. Immo Fiebrig is a qualified pharmacist, scholar, and professional communicator in permaculture and health.

Martin Schnyder

Martin Schnyder is a trained landscape gardener and has been working as a self-employed gardener in central Switzerland since 1997.

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