Chelsea Green Publishing

Building a Low Impact Roundhouse, 4th Edition

Pages:160 pages
Book Art:Full-color illustrations throughout
Size: 5.75 x 8.25 inch
Publisher:Permanent Publications
Paperback: 9781856231749
Pub. Date July 25, 2014

Building a Low Impact Roundhouse, 4th Edition

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
July 25, 2014

$14.95

In Building a Low Impact Roundhouse, Tony shares his many years of experience, skills, and techniques used to build this unique and affordable low-impact home. Always witty and inspiring, the author explains the process of visualizing and designing a house through to the practical side of lifting the living roof, infilling the walls, laying out rooms, and adding renewable, autonomous technology.

Building a Low Impact Roundhouse has become a classic text sold all over the world. Tony’s home and lifestyle have attracted much media interest, and he and his partner continue to inspire many individuals and communities to seek out ways of living more sustainably.

Now in its third edition, with a fascinating ten-year update including a major new section on the couple’s marvelous straw bale den, Tony also includes sections on the physical design, and he writes about the lifestyle required for living in a roundhouse. He offers advice on roofs, floors, walls, compost toilets, wood stoves, kitchens, windows, and planning permission. There are additional photographs of life in and around the dwelling and illustrations from the construction plans for one of the UK’s most unique homes.

This true and captivating story covers the realizing of a lifetime’s dream as well as being a practical “how to” manual for anyone who loves the idea of low-impact living and wants to self-build an affordable, organic home.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tony Wrench

In 1993, Tony Wrench developed the concept of “permaculture land”, a low-impact sustainable way of life that included self-building with local materials, appropriate technology, and food growing. In 1997, he and his partner built and moved into a low-impact roundhouse.

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