Chelsea Green Publishing

Nontoxic Housecleaning

Pages:96 pages
Book Art:Full-color photos throughout
Size: 4.75 x 6.5 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781603582032
Pub. Date September 15, 2009

Nontoxic Housecleaning

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
September 15, 2009

$12.95

When it comes to cleaning products, society often values convenience over personal and planetary health, thanks to decades of advertising propaganda from the chemical companies that market overpriced and dangerous concoctions. But awareness is changing: Not only are homemade and nontoxic cleaners strong enough for the toughest grunge, they are often as convenient as their commercial counterparts.

Nontoxic Housecleaning—the latest in the Chelsea Green Guide series—provides a way for people to improve their immediate environment every day. Pregnant women, parents of young children, pet owners, people with health concerns, and those who simply care about a healthy environment—and a sensible budget—can all benefit from the recipes and tips in this guide.

Included are tips for:

  • The basic ingredients: what they are, and why they work.
  • Specific techniques for each room and cleaning need in the house.
  • Detailed recipes for homemade cleaners, including floor polishes, all-purpose cleanser, disinfecting cleanser, window cleaner, oven cleaner, furniture polish, mold- and mildew-killing cleansers, bathroom scrub, deodorizers, stain removers, laundry boosters and starch, metal polishes, scouring powder, and more.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Amy Kolb Noyes

Amy Kolb Noyes lives, works (and cleans) at Indecision Farm, in Vermont. She is a reporter and producer for Vermont Public Radio and you can find her work at vpr.net or follow her on Twitter @AmyKolbNoyes. She also authored Living the Green Up Way, a story and activity book used in Vermont schools, published by the environmental stewardship nonprofit Green Up Vermont.

 

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