Chelsea Green Publishing

Sustainable Food

Pages:96 pages
Book Art:Full-color illustrations throughout
Size: 4.75 x 6.5 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781603581417
Pub. Date September 15, 2009

Sustainable Food

How to Buy Right and Spend Less

Categories:
Food & Drink

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
September 15, 2009

$7.95

Wondering whether it’s worth it to splurge on the locally raised beef? What about those organic carrots? New in the Chelsea Green Guides series, Sustainable Food: How to Buy Right and Spend Less helps the average shopper navigate the choices, whether strolling the aisles of a modern supermarket or foraging at a local farmers market.

This down-to-earth, casual guide—small enough to be slipped into your pocket—answers these and other questions for the shopper:

  • What are the differences among organic, local, fair-trade, free-range, naturally raised, and biodynamic foods?
  • How affordable is it to subscribe to a CSA farm—and what are the advantages?
  • Is it better to choose wild Alaskan salmon at $18.99, or the Chilean farmed fish at $11.99?
  • What cooking oils can be sustainably sourced?
  • How can a food co-op increase access to, and affordability of, healthier, Earth-friendly foods?
  • Where can you find sustainably produced sugar, and are there any local replacements for sweeteners from faraway lands?
  • What do the distinctions between shade-grown and trellised coffee mean?
  • Is shark okay to eat? How about mackerel?
  • Why is the war on plastic bags so important?

Sustainable eating just got easier.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Elise McDonough

Elise McDonough trained at New York City's Natural Gourmet Institute, but her informal training in counterculture cuisine began at the Cleveland Food Co-op, where she was initiated into the world of food politics, strange ingredients, and alternative diets. She lives in New York, where she volunteers at the Union Square Greenmarket, and is actively involved in many local farm and food issues.

AUTHOR VIDEOS

Elise McDonough Explains Sustainable Food from an NYC Farmers' Market

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Pawpaw

Pawpaw

By Andrew Moore

The largest edible fruit native to the United States tastes like a cross between a banana and a mango. It grows wild in twenty-six states, gracing Eastern forests each fall with sweet-smelling, tropical-flavored abundance. Historically, it fed and sustained Native Americans and European explorers, presidents, and enslaved African Americans, inspiring folk songs, poetry, and scores of place names from Georgia to Illinois. Its trees are an organic grower’s dream, requiring no pesticides or herbicides to thrive, and containing compounds that are among the most potent anticancer agents yet discovered.

So why have so few people heard of the pawpaw, much less tasted one?  

In Pawpaw—a 2016 James Beard Foundation Award nominee in the Writing & Literature category—author Andrew Moore explores the past, present, and future of this unique fruit, traveling from the Ozarks to Monticello; canoeing the lower Mississippi in search of wild fruit; drinking pawpaw beer in Durham, North Carolina; tracking down lost cultivars in Appalachian hollers; and helping out during harvest season in a Maryland orchard. Along the way, he gathers pawpaw lore and knowledge not only from the plant breeders and horticulturists working to bring pawpaws into the mainstream (including Neal Peterson, known in pawpaw circles as the fruit’s own “Johnny Pawpawseed”), but also regular folks who remember eating them in the woods as kids, but haven’t had one in over fifty years. 

As much as Pawpaw is a compendium of pawpaw knowledge, it also plumbs deeper questions about American foodways—how economic, biologic, and cultural forces combine, leading us to eat what we eat, and sometimes to ignore the incredible, delicious food growing all around us. If you haven’t yet eaten a pawpaw, this book won’t let you rest until you do.

Available in: Paperback

Read More

Pawpaw

Andrew Moore, Michael W. Twitty

Paperback $19.95

The New Bread Basket

The New Bread Basket

By Amy Halloran

For more than 10,000 years, grains have been the staples of Western civilization. The stored energy of grain allowed our ancestors to shift from nomadic hunting and gathering and build settled communities—even great cities. Though most bread now comes from factory bakeries, the symbolism of wheat and bread—amber waves of grain, the staff of life—still carries great meaning.

Today, bread and beer are once again building community as a new band of farmers, bakers, millers, and maltsters work to reinvent local grain systems. The New Bread Basket tells their stories and reveals the village that stands behind every loaf and every pint.

While eating locally grown crops like heirloom tomatoes has become almost a cliché, grains are late in arriving to local tables, because growing them requires a lot of land and equipment. Milling, malting, and marketing take both tools and cooperation. The New Bread Basket reveals the bones of that cooperation, profiling the seed breeders, agronomists, and grassroots food activists who are collaborating with farmers, millers, bakers, and other local producers. 

Take Andrea and Christian Stanley, a couple who taught themselves the craft of malting and opened the first malthouse in New England in one hundred years. Outside Ithaca, New York, bread from a farmer-miller-baker partnership has become an emblem in the battle against shale gas fracking. And in the Pacific Northwest, people are shifting grain markets from commodity exports to regional feed, food, and alcohol production. Such pioneering grain projects give consumers an alternative to industrial bread and beer, and return their production to a scale that respects people, local communities, and the health of the environment.

Many Americans today avoid gluten and carbohydrates. Yet, our shared history with grains—from the village baker to Wonder Bread—suggests that modern changes in farming and processing could be the real reason that grains have become suspect in popular nutrition. The people profiled in The New Bread Basket are returning to traditional methods like long sourdough fermentations that might address the dietary ills attributed to wheat. Their work and lives make our foundational crops visible, and vital, again.

Available in: Paperback

Read More

The New Bread Basket

Amy Halloran

Paperback $17.95

The Slow Food Dictionary to Italian Regional Cooking

The Slow Food Dictionary to Italian Regional Cooking

The handy and practical Slow Food Dictionary of Regional Italian Cooking by the editors at Slow Food International tells you everything you ever wanted to know about Italian regional cooking as prepared in homes, osterias, and restaurants. Packed with information about dishes and ingredients, tools and techniques, origins and trends, the book (which contains forty color illustrations) is aimed primarily at food lovers but will also be of interest to anyone curious to find out more about Italy in general, its people, its language, its history, and its culture.

Available in: Paperback

Read More

The Slow Food Dictionary to Italian Regional Cooking

Paola Gho, John Irving

Paperback $34.95

A Cafecito Story / El cuento del cafecito

A Cafecito Story / El cuento del cafecito

By Julia Alvarez and Bill Eichner and Belkis Ramirez

A Cafecito Story is a story of love, coffee, birds and hope. It is a beautifully written eco-fable by best-selling author Julia Alvarez. Based on her and her husband's experiences trying to reclaim a small coffee farm in her native Dominican Republic, A Cafecito Story shows how the return to the traditional methods of shade-grown coffee can rehabilitate and rejuvenate the landscape and human culture, while at the same time preserving vital winter habitat for threatened songbirds.

Not a political or environmental polemic, A Cafecito Story is instead a poetic, modern fable about human beings at their best. The challenge of producing coffee is a remarkable test of our ability to live more sustainably, caring for the land, growers, and consumers in an enlightened and just way. Written with Julia Alvarez's deft touch, this is a story that stimulates while it comforts, waking the mind and warming the soul like the first cup of morning coffee. Indeed, this story is best read with a strong cup of organic, shade-grown, fresh-brewed coffee.

Available in: Paperback

Read More

A Cafecito Story / El cuento del cafecito

Julia Alvarez, Bill Eichner, Belkis Ramirez, Daisy Cocco de Filippis

Paperback $12.95