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Chelsea Green - Page 3 of 409 - The Politics and Practice of Sustainable Living. : Chelsea Green

Build a Wood-Fired Oven in Your Backyard

June 12th, 2014 by admin

Ever dreamed of building a wood-fired oven and baking crispy pizzas, flatbreads, pastries, or even braising meats in your own backyard? Dream no longer, as you’re sure to find inspiration in Richard Miscovich’s book, From the Wood-Fired Oven: New and Traditional Techniques for Cooking and Baking with Fire.

Miscovich, a bread expert and instructor, offers a wide range of useful recipes for home and artisan bakers as well as oven designs, live-fire roasting techniques, and methods that maximize the oven’s complete heat cycle, from the initial firing to its final cooling. In the excerpt below you’ll find a few general masonry design recommendations to get you thinking about how to turn your dream wood-fired oven into a reality.

For an in-depth bread baking tutorial from Miscovich, check out his online class, Handmade Sourdough: From Starter to Baked Loaf, at Craftsy.com.

General Masonry Oven Design Tips by Chelsea Green Publishing

Save 35% on our New Crop of Spring Books

June 11th, 2014 by admin

We are thrilled to announce the release of our new Spring titles!

Whether you are looking to tackle cheesemaking; take the next leap in permaculture; for the guide to whole-animal butchery or to just give your kitchen (or garden) a permaculture twist — you’ll find that and much more!

For thirty years, Chelsea Green has published books, that you will turn to again and again. We don’t cater to fads or trends, but focus on being a resource for a timeless and holistic approach.

Let our new Spring Releases inspire you with ideas and practical skills!

Happy reading from your friends at Chelsea Green Publishing.

Don’t forget, we offer FREE shipping on orders of $100 or more.


Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only). International orders can be placed by phone (802-295-6300) or email.

New Spring Releases 35% Off Until July 3rd
Grass, Soil, Hope
Hemp Bound
Extracted
Snake Oil
The New Net Zero
The Small-Scale Cheese Business
The Small-Scale Dairy
The Gourmet Butcher's Guide to Meat
The Permaculture Kitchen
Let The Water Do The Work
Gene Everlasting
Edible Perennial Gardening
Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist

Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only). International orders can be placed by phone (802-295-6300) or email.

Tap Into Vermont’s Craft Beer Scene

June 10th, 2014 by admin

Vermont brewers are emerging as some of the most innovative and entrepreneurial crafters on the American beer scene, if not the world. Discover what the Green Mountain state has to offer with this recently released guidebook, FarmPlate Vermont Beer: Behind the Scenes with Vermont Craft Brewers, published by FarmPlate and distributed in partnership with Chelsea Green.

Back in the mid-1980s, Vermont microbreweries were just starting out. “Craft beer was a fringe thing—it was a missionary like movement brought to be by a few renegades who had traveled abroad and discovered that beer could be different, very different from what we’d all grown up with. It was a revelation,” writes Phil Markowski, brewmaster for Two Roads Brewing Co., in the book’s introduction.

Since then, microbreweries and craft beers have become increasingly popular and are now considered part of the American mainstream. “Today, Vermont is home to some of the most sought-after craft beers in the country, many of which seem to unknowingly break new ground. So good … if you can get them!” writes Markowski. “A few are deliciously rare and hard to find (literally take the dirt road to the right and then turn left at the tractor), only adding to their mystique.”

With FarmPlate’s guidebook in hand, you won’t miss a single hidden gem. Tour Vermont’s 32 breweries and get to know the creative minds behind the brews via exclusive interviews with these inspired visionaries. Each profile includes a Q&A with either the founder or head brewer of the microbrewery, providing insight into what inspires them as brewmasters and what the future holds for their brewery and craft brewing in general.

Inside you’ll also find:

  • A curated guide to the top 100+ beer-focused restaurants and markets in Vermont.
  • Easy-reference maps charting the featured
 craft breweries, restaurants and markets.
  • A calendar of not-to-be-missed annual beer 
events.
  • A preview of On Tap Soon breweries set to open in 2014.
  • Local sources of homebrewing supplies and hops + grains if you’re inspired to brew your own.

For the full introduction and selected excerpts from FarmPlate Vermont Beer check out this feature in Vermont Magazine.

Cheers!

New Books from our Publishing Partners

June 9th, 2014 by admin

Changing the world is no light undertaking. It takes a village to spread the word about sustainable living, and at Chelsea Green Publishing we partner with like-minded publishers and writers around the world to bring their books to a wider readership in the United States.

One of our strongest partnerships is with Permanent Publications, a forward thinking publisher in the UK that produces the best of permaculture media and publishes the influential Permaculture magazine.

Here’s an update on our latest selection of books available from Permanent Publications:

 

Permaculture Kitchen- This is a cookbook for gardeners who love to eat their own produce, and for people who enjoy a weekly veggies box, or supporting their local farmers’ market. It’s the ultimate introduction to economical, seasonal, and delicious cooking.

Edible Perennial Gardening- If you long for a forest garden but simply don’t have the space for tree crops, or want to grow a low-maintenance edible polyculture, this book will explain everything you need to know to get started on a new gardening adventure that will provide you with beauty and food for your household and save you money.

Earth User’s Guide to Permaculture- This completely revised and updated edition is a straight-forward manual of practical permaculture. This book will be most beneficial if you apply it to the space where you live and work. Earth User’s Guide to Permaculture is suitable for beginners as well as experienced permaculture practitioners looking for new ideas in moving towards greater self-reliance and sustainable living.

Earth Users Guide to Teaching Permaculture- This fully revised and updated edition contains a wealth of technical information for teaching permaculture design and includes new findings in emerging disciplines such as regenerative agriculture. The Earth’s Guide to Teaching Permaculture is of key relevance to teachers and students of architecture, landscape design, ecology, and other disciplines like geography, regenerative agriculture, agro-ecology, and agroforestry, as well as permaculture design. With advice on teaching aids, topics for class discussion, extensive reading lists, and tips on teaching adults, this book is bound to be an invaluable friend to the experienced and novice teacher alike.

And from one of our other long-time partners, Slow Food Editore, check out Slow Wine 2014.

For the third year running, Slow Food International offers an English-language edition of their guide to Italian wines whose qualities extend well beyond the palate. Slow Wine 2014 doesn’t simply select and review Italy’s finest bottles. It describes what’s in the glass, but it also tells you what’s behind it: namely the work, the aims, and the passion of producers; their bond with the land; and their choice of cultivation and cellar techniques—favoring the ones who implement ecologically sustainable winegrowing and winemaking practices.

 

Low Maintenance Perennials for Your Garden

June 5th, 2014 by admin

It’s Perennial Gardening Month, so what better time to be introduced to low maintenance perennials suited for gardeners of all interests and abilities. Perennials are remarkable plants that, once established, can be harvested for years, some even decades, with little effort on your part.

In his book, Perennial Vegetables, permaculture and plants expert Eric Toensmeier profiles more than 100 of the best veggies you can plant to help turn your landscape into an edible Eden. In the excerpt below, Toensmeier provides an overview of a couple key plants to consider growing in your backyard.

Meet the tender perennial goldenberry and the self-seeding annual ground cherry. Their unique flavor is sweet, slightly nutty, reminiscent of a tomato, and a bit musky—the perfect addition to any gardener’s table.

Happy perennial planting!

Ground Cherry and Goldenberry by Chelsea Green Publishing

Lies, Damned Lies, and Fracking

June 4th, 2014 by admin

Peak oil? Bah! Fracking will save us and keep us energy independent for centuries – right? Wrong.

In Snake Oil: How Fracking’s False Promise of Plenty Imperils Our Future — now available through Chelsea Green — Post Carbon Institute’s senior fellow Richard Heinberg explains in detail how and why the oil and gas industry – aided and abetted by allies in the government and on Wall Street – are selling us a pack of lies when it comes to the promise of fracking.

Heinberg systematically debunks the snake oil sales pitches to provide readers, and anti-fracking activists, the real information they need – along with critical arguments to combat industry lies.

Stitching together proprietary industry data and years of his own research, Snake Oil tells the story about shale gas wells that cost more to drill than their gas is worth at current prices; Wall Street investment banks driving independent oil and gas companies to produce uneconomic resources just so brokers can collect fees; and official agencies that have overestimated oil production and underestimated prices consistently for the past decade.

Heinberg also relates stories gathered from people who live close to the nation’s thousands of fracked oil and gas wells—a tale of how drinking water, air, soil, livestock, and wildlife are poisoned or degraded; how companies fail to pay agreed lease fees; how property values actually decline; and how neighbor turned against neighbor.

In Snake Oil, you’ll find out why:

  • The oil and gas industry’s recent unexpected successes will prove to be short-lived, far shorter than we’ve been led to believe.
  • Their actual, long-term significance has been overstated because they are often double counting, or counting reserves that are too expensive to access given current technology.
  • New unconventional sources of oil and gas production come with hidden costs (both monetary and environmental) that society cannot support in the long-term, and maybe not the short-term.

Heinberg’s chief conclusion and observation is that the oil and gas industry’s exaggerations of future supply have been motivated by short-term financial self-interest, and, to the extent that they influence national energy policy, they are a disaster for America and for future generations.

Previously, Chelsea Green Publishing and Post Carbon Institute combined forces to produce the Community Resilience Guide series — three books that examined how to relocalize food, monetary, and energy systems. Despite the stranglehold that multinational corporations have on these three resources, there are local solutions that you, and your community, can use to become more sustainable and resilient for years to come.

 

Permaculture Q&A: Month in Review

June 3rd, 2014 by admin

Throughout May, in honor of Permaculture Month, our authors were on call to answer permaculture related questions submitted by our readers. Thanks to everyone who participated!

Here’s a recap of all of our author responses. We hope this information and advice inspires you to get your hands dirty and use the principles of permaculture design in your own backyard.

Permaculture Q&A Series

 


Ben Falk, author of The Resilient Farm and Homestead, talks about the importance of harvesting and cycling nutrients. Read more …


Toby Hemenway, author of Gaia’s Garden, talks about soil structure and explains how permaculture is based on the replication of patterns found in nature. Read more …


Eric Toensmeier, author of Paradise LotPerennial Vegetables and co-author of Edible Forest Gardens, discusses how to handle invasive grasses and the best plants for shady spots. Read more …


Toby Hemenway(Gaia’s Garden) and Eric Toensmeier (Paradise LotPerennial Vegetables) discuss the business side of permaculture. Read more …


Michael Judd,author of Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist, reveals his special recipe for blueberry soil mix that imitates the plant’s natural forest edge habitat. Read more …


Wayne Weiseman, co-author of Integrated Forest Gardening, explains what swales are and what questions to ask to determine if they are right for your landscape. Read more …


Daniel Halsey and Bryce Ruddock, co-authors of Integrated Forest Gardening, discuss the research they and others have done on plant guilds and how to implement these guilds based on differing water requirements. Read more …

 

Get Hip to Hemp: It’s Hemp History Week

June 2nd, 2014 by admin

It’s that time of year again — Hemp History Week. A time when we hemp enthusiasts celebrate this versatile crop that has been kept from being planted in U.S. farm fields due to an outdated and misguided Federal policy – created in the 1930s.

Ah, but change is in the air this 5th annual Hemp History Week. The federal Farm Bill signed into law earlier this year will allow hemp crops to be planted for the first time in more than a half century. Well, sort of. The crops must be for research only, not commercial, and the federal Drug Enforcement Agency has to allow seeds to be imported.

One step forward …

Here at Chelsea Green Publishing – now in our 30th year as a book publisher – we are proud to be a supporter of this year’s Hemp History Week. We published our first book about hemp in 1997 (Nutiva founder John Roulac’s book, Hemp Horizons).

We returned to the promise of hemp — environmentally, agriculturally, and economically — with investigative journalist and goat farmer Doug Fine and the publication of Hemp Bound: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Next Agricultural Revolution. In this book, Fine introduces readers to a variety of innovative hemp applications from riding in a hemp-powered limo to testing hemp-based building insulation.

Join Hemp History Week

To learn more about Doug’s book and just how hemp could be the next billion-dollar plant that’s going to change our diet, restore our soil and wean us from petroleum, check out this post. And, test your hemp history knowledge with this Hemp Quiz. To find a Hemp History Week event near you, check out Hemp History Week’s event page.

Fine kicked off Hemp History Week with a Q&A as part of the Firedoglake Book Salon, and we’re hosting a Hemp History Week Book Club on Wednesday. RSVP here and get a discounted copy of Fine’s book and join the hemp revolution.

Hemp History Week (June 2-8, 2014) is an industry-wide education initiative of the Hemp Industries Association (HIA) and Vote Hemp designed to amplify support for hemp farming in the U.S.

Check out this video – “It’s Time to Grow” — from our friends at Hemp History Week.

 

Permaculture Q&A: Plant Guild Research and Development

May 29th, 2014 by admin

As Permaculture Month comes to an end, we wanted to share some final questions posed to our permaculture authors from our readers. Today, Daniel Halsey and Bryce Ruddock, authors of Integrated Forest Gardening, discuss the research they and others have done on plant guilds and how to implement these guilds based on differing water requirements.

For answers to questions about soil preparation, design patterns, swales and more, browse these previous posts from the “Permaculture Q&A” series:
Are Swales Right For You?
Michael Judd’s Blueberry Soil Mix
Permaculture: An Economic Perspective
Eric Toensmeier on Aggressive Grass and Partial Shade
Toby Hemenway on Soil and Natural Patterns
Ben Falk Talks Nutrient Cycling

Michelle from IL asks:
How much formal research, if any, has been done on guilds to understand how they work and why they work?

DANIEL HALSEY: Formal research about plant guilds requires a literature review of many studies that in aggregate contribute to the knowledge of how plants interact with each other and support or deter each other’s growth. We must also define what a plant guild is. That and the assembly of guilds has been the focus of our book, Integrated Forest Gardening.

A plant, like insects, animals, and fish has a number of guilds. An insect for example has a predator guild including all the other insects that eat it. The plant will have a herbivore guild consisting of the group of insects or animals that eat it.

When we talk about an apple tree guild, we are referring to all the plants we use in the guild to support the apple tree. When we assemble these apple tree guilds, we can choose from many plants, but the needs of the apple tree ecology is what we are trying to fulfill. Thus we surround the apple tree with nitrogen fixtures, nutrient accumulators, aromatic pest confusers, soil builders, and hopefully beneficial insects and organisms. Each group of ecological functions and services provided by plants are also guilds, because they supply the same service. So you choose from a nitrogen fixing guild, a beneficial habitat guild, and soil cultivator guild. The word in front of “guild” describes what kind of guild it is.

As far as the efficacy of plant guilds, the research has been done by numerous and well-known individuals focusing on a specific ecological function or service. Much of the strategy has come from years of observation, study, and written in books by Robert Hart, Bill Mollison, Patrick Whitefield, and Dave Jacke. You can also read books by Dr. Elaine Ingham to find out about soil life and the interactions and importance of soil organisms to plants, among many other researchers.

On the other hand, some of the research articles can also be quite specific, but applicable, such as with Dr. Nicholas Jordan (University of Minnesota) who has researched canadian wild rye and its facilitation in restoring soil organism populations in agricultural fields and entomologist Dr. George Heimpel.

Many times when you are looking to find a definitive answer to a question, the pieces to the puzzle come from many different boxes. We tried to assemble those pieces in our book Integrated Forest Gardening: The Complete Guide to Polycultures and Plant Guilds in Permaculture Systems.

Anna from New Mexico asks:
Dry climate in high altitude. There are some areas where I can collect more run off in my yard than others. For my food forest, would it be a good idea to plant low water together and those [plants] that need more [water] in the places I can collect more gentle rain run off? Or would it be better to mix them so something grows and then add the more needy plantings into an already existing planting? … I am having difficulty figuring out the guild things. Does it matter what I put together just as long as they complement in space/time and need?

BRYCE RUDDOCK: Setting up plant guilds based upon differing water requirements can allow you to use the micro niches on your property, the places where slight differences in soil type and drainage present the most challenges. These are of course the edges between areas where you have been collecting and infiltrating water, building a humus layer in the soil, and those places with stony and drier soils nearby.

Mixing the species together may work so long as more drought resilient plants are kept from getting soggy feet, which is probably not too likely in the high desert. Each guild should fade into the next so that rather than separate pockets of plant species, an uninterrupted progression of plants of different needs and yields will result. Of course, if the sites are widely separated, then the edge areas of interaction between the guilds are larger.

As a canopy species fills in with a crown of leaves and gains mature height it will result in more shade naturally, and some modifications to the design will occur either naturally, or by design. Many of the understory plants can thrive in varying regimes of light levels, from full sun to partial shade. Many of them will benefit from some shade during the hottest times of the year, during the afternoon hours when the heat is intense. A few species such as strawberries have cultivars and subspecies specific to different sunlight levels.

A major consideration in selecting plant guild species is how appropriate they are for the site. For dry land guilds, there are many species adapted over millenia by indigenous peoples that can fill the list of plants that will survive and are useful for human and animal needs. Too often a guild can be set up with species that are marginal for a site.  By working on building organic matter in the soil and enabling the growth of beneficial fungal, you can expand the choices of species that will work well in a guild. In the end, only you can decide which guild components are best for you. Follow the guidelines from permaculture and be ready to improvise according to your needs.

Integrated Forest Gardening and all of our permaculture titles are on sale for 35% off. Act now! Sale ends June 1.

Permaculture Special: Last Chance!

May 28th, 2014 by admin

This is it. Your last chance to reap the savings on all of our permaculture books. But hurry – sale ends June 1st.

By adding a permaculture twist to your garden design you can spend less effort, improve the health of your soil, and enjoy a bountiful harvest.

Chelsea Green has been the go-to publisher for key home-scale permaculture books for thirty years. Learn more about this simple but revolutionary system with these groundbreaking books—on sale for a limited time.

Happy reading from your friends at Chelsea Green Publishing.

P.S. In case you missed it for the month of May we put our pioneering permaculture authors at your disposal. Take a peek at the last Q&A posts here: Are Swales Right for You; Michael Judd’s Blueberry Soil Mix; and Eric Toensmeier on Aggressive Grass and Partial Shade.


Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books
already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or
more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only)
Permaculture Sale: until June 1st

 

The Resilient Farm and Homestead
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00
Edible Perennial Gardening
Retail: $22.95
Sale: $14.92
Integrated Forest Gardening
Retail: $45.00
Sale: $29.25
Edible Forest Gardens (2 volume set)
Retail: $150.00
Sale: $97.50
Gaia's Garden, 2nd Edition
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Paradise Lot
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
The Permaculture Kitchen
Retail: $22.95
Sale: $14.92
Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Sepp Holzer's Permaculture
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Grass, Soil, Hope
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
Perennial Vegetables Set
Retail: $35.00
Sale: $22.75
Edible Cities
Retail: $22.95
Sale: $14.92
Food Not Lawns
Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25
The Small-Scale Poultry Flock
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
The Holistic Orchard
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
Top-Bar Beekeeping
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Natural Beekeeping, Revised and Expanded
Retail: $34.95
Sale: $22.72
Permaculture in Pots
Retail: $14.95
Sale: $9.72
Letting in the Wild Edges
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Earth User's Guide to Teaching Permaculture
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Sowing Seeds in the Desert
Retail: $15.95
Sale: $10.37
Outdoor Classrooms
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
The Earth User's Guide to Permaculture
Retail: $37.95
Sale: $24.67
People & Permaculture
Retail: $34.95
Sale: $22.72
The Basics of Permaculture Design
Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25
Desert or Paradise
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
The Woodland Way
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond Vol. 1
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond Vol. 2
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
Permaculture
Retail: $30.00
Sale: $19.50
Permaculture Pioneers
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
The Permaculture Way
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
The Earth Care Manual
Retail: $75.00
Sale: $48.75
The Permaculture Garden
Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25
The Uses of Wild Plants
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
How to Make a Forest Garden
Retail: $30.00
Sale: $19.50
Permaculture Plants
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Permaculture Design
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Permaculture in a Nutshell
Retail: $12.95
Sale: $8.42
Getting Started in Permaculture
Retail: $14.95
Sale: $9.72
Designing and Maintaining Your Edible Landscape Naturally
Retail: $49.95
Sale: $32.47
Holistic Orchard with Michael Phillips
Retail: $49.95
Sale: $32.47
Perennial Vegetable Gardening with Eric Toensmeier
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Natural Beekeeping with Ross Conrad
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Top-Bar Beekeeping with Les Crowder and Heather Harrell
Retail: $14.95
Sale: $9.72

Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books
already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or
more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only)

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