On Creating an Intellectual Community Hub (Or, Why We Are So Money)

Categories: Chelsea Green News
Posted on Sunday, August 30th, 2009 at 4:34 pm by dpacheco

We must be doing something right, I guess.

You know how we hate to toot our own horn. I mean, sure, we’ve become something of a social media sustainability juggernaut, blazing a trail across the blogosphere (and the Twitterverse, and the Facebook…um, galaxy) with nothing but a staff of three dedicated team members, a couple of laptops, a coffee maker, and a ceaseless flow of “that’s what she said” jokes (mostly from our resident “she,” Makenna Goodman), but we don’t let it go to our heads.

Really, we owe it all to our readers and the wonderful green community, linking hands across cyberspace. Take it away, Gabriel!

It’s rare to find a content-producer that produces content in heaps of different topics, and yet, through them all, carries a theme that appeals to me. Take, for example, Your Favorite Band (which is undoubtedly cooler than My Favorite Band). My guess is that they have a common theme, something you really jive onto, that runs throughout their music. That theme is what makes even the duds tolerable.

This theme, of having an overall “good”-ness, is why I’ve been digging publisher Chelsea Green. I began exploring their books a while ago, and wrote a blog post on The Gort Cloud. As I dug deeper, I realized that this publisher, whose tagline is “The Politics and Practice of Sustainable Living,” is like My Favorite Band: a miss here and there, but by and large, an amazing repository of community engagement around sustainable living. I’ve short-listed below a couple “must-read” books I’ve really enjoyed.

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money: Investing as if Food, Farms, and Fertility Mattered - My bible, by a guy who knows better, Woody Tasch. This book, written by the former chairman of Investors’ Circle, addresses a “fiduciary responsibility that is not stuck in the industrial concepts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but which reflects the new economic, social and environmental realities of the 21st century.” Needless to say, with the problems being experienced across the economy the last year plus, these ideas could not come at a better time. Some of the ideas explored in the book include the notion of localized investments (something I’ve also explored in past posts, including on CSAs and community-supported businesses), and an investment fund with a much broader understanding of its desired return on investment (for example, adding “soil quality” into the mix). I am saddened that I shall miss the first national congress of Slow Money, taking place in September (if you go – let me know how it was!).

Read the whole article here.

 

Related Articles:

Digg!
Share

Leave a Reply


Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com