Chelsea Green News Archive


Save 35% off on our New Crop of Fall Books

Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

Finishing your preserving and gardening projects? Dreaming of what next year’s plans will bring?

Whether you are looking to tackle cider making; raising a family cow; tap into sugaring (spoiler alert: it’s not just for maple); or to learn from farmer Joel Salatin on building the next generation of farmers — you’ll find that and much more with our new fall releases.

For nearly thirty years, Chelsea Green has published books, written by experts that focus on being a resource for timeless skills that you will turn to again and again. Books that contain both a holistic approach, and detailed, how-to ways to expand your skills.

Don’t miss some of our favorite titles just released in paperback!

 

New Books: On Sale until November 22nd

 

From the Wood Fired Oven
Retail: $44.95
Sale: $29.22
Keeping a Family Cow
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
The New Cider Makers Handbook
Retail: $44.95
Sale: $29.22
The Sugarmaker's Companion
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
The Zero Waste Solution
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Out on a Limb
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Market Farming Success
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Flying Blind
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Marijuana is Safer
Retail: $14.95
Sale: $9.72
Fields of Farmers
Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25
The Organic Grain Grower
Retail: $45.00
Sale: $29.25
Retail: $49.95
Sale: $32.47
Pre-Order your copy!!

 

Sowing Seeds in the Desert
Retail: $15.95
Sale: $10.37
Reinventing Fire
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Wild Flavors
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Cooking Close to Home
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
The Log Book
Retail: $12.95
Sale: $8.42
No-Regrets Remodeling, Second Edition
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
The New Vegetable Growers Handbook
Retail: $27.95
Sale: $18.17
Letting in the Wild Edges
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Permaculture in Pots
Retail: $14.95
Sale: $9.72
Do it Yourself 12 Volt Solar Power
Retail: $14.95
Sale: $9.72
Moneyless Manifesto
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
The Woodland Way
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47

 


Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books
already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or
more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only)
per inceptos himenaeos.

Classic and Best Selling

Friday, October 18th, 2013

 

The Resilient Farm and Homestead
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00
The Art of Fermentation
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
The Organic Grain Grower
Retail: $45.00
Sale: $29.25
The New Cider Maker's Handbook
Retail: $44.95
Sale: $29.22
Edible Forest Gardens (2 volume set)
Retail: $150.00
Sale: $97.50
The Resilient Gardener
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Gaia's Garden, Second Edition
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
The Man Who Planted Trees
Retail: $22.50
Sale: $14.62
Out on a Limb
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
The Sugarmaker's Companion
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
Paradise Lot
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
From the Wood-Fired Oven
Retail: $44.95
Sale: $29.22
Four-Season Harvest
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning
Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25
Wild Fermentation
Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25
You Can Farm
Retail: $35.00
Sale: $22.75
The Organic Seed Grower
Retail: $49.95
Sale: $32.47
The Small-Scale Poultry Flock
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00
Natural Beekeeping, Revised and Expanded Edition
Retail: $34.95
Sale: $22.72
The New Organic Grower
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
The Bread Builders
Retail: $35.00
Sale: $22.75
Seed to Seed
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Sepp Holzer's Permaculture
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Rebuilding the Foodshed
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
https://www.chelseagreen.com/common/files/image/_tmb_product/162.jpg
Retail: $35.00
Sale: $22.25
The Holistic Orchard
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Limits to Growth
Retail: $22.50
Sale: $14.62
Thinking in Systems
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
When Technology Fails
Retail: $35.00
Sale: $22.75
Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money
Retail: $15.95
Sale: $10.37
The Chinese Medicinal Herb Farm
Retail: $34.95
Sale: $22.72
The Grafter's Handbook
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00
The New Horse-Powered Farm
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
Farms with a Future
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Desert or Paradise
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
The Straw Bale House
Retail: $34.95
Sale: $22.72
The Winter Harvest Handbook
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
The Natural House
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00

 


Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books
already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or
more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only)
per inceptos himenaeos.

Do you ‘Like’ us?

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

There’s been a lot of media attention recently to “the sharing economy” — a tech-enabled way for people to share rides, rent out rooms or houses, and much more.


For nearly 30 years, Chelsea Green Publishing has practiced an age-old form of the sharing economy — sharing recipes, DIY tips for your home, garden, farmkitchen, and community.


Books are the primary way we share information, but we use social media — Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Google+, as well as our twice-monthly newsletter— on a daily basis to share simple projects you can tackle in a weekend, special bargains, and more that you can then, in turn, share with friends, neighbors, and coworkers.

Join our growing online community:

If you haven’t already, consider joining the 18,000+ like-minded readers who already “like” us on Facebook, or the 21,000+ who follow us on Twitter, or the more than 50,000 people who receive our newsletter.


From your sharing friends Chelsea Green Publishing


P.S. All new subscribers to our newsletter receive a 25 percent discount on their next purchase when they buy direct from us.

 

 

 

The Book that Fermented a Cultural Revival

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

This month marks the 10th anniversary of the first printing of Sandor Ellix Katz’s Wild Fermentation, a book that helped launch a fermentation revival in this country.

Since its publication, Katz has traveled the globe teaching hands-on workshops and learning from others about the many foods and beverages made by the process of fermentation. His travel schedule – and his personal appeal– aptly earned him the title of “The Johnny Appleseed of Fermentation” from Michael Pollan. To see why Katz has earned this reputation, check out his workshop DVD (a clip is below).

The additional knowledge Katz has gained since the publication of Wild Fermentation is found in The Art of Fermentation, Katz’s award-winning book published last year. The book landed on The New York Times bestseller list, was featured on Fresh Air, and won a Beard Foundation Book Award in the reference category.

To celebrate Wild Fermentation’s 10th anniversary, we asked Senior Editor Ben Watson to recount meeting Katz for the first time, and bringing this important book to print.

I will never forget the day I first met Sandor Katz, though oddly I can’t remember exactly what year it was—either 2000 or 2001. He was traveling, staying with friends in Vermont, and had arranged to come into the Chelsea Green offices to meet with our editorial team: myself; Jim Schley, our longtime editor-in-chief; and Stephen Morris, the publisher and president of the company at the time. This was when Chelsea Green was in the old Gates-Briggs Building in the center of White River Junction, an historic edifice with a lot of what could generously be called “character.” The drop ceilings in the editorial office were just that—ceiling panels would work themselves loose and float down periodically, exposing wiring and pipes. The theater just down the hall was the scene of summer musical rehearsals, with kids belting out chestnuts like “Tomorrow” from Annie . . . all day long. And of course the whole building shook ever so slightly whenever the Amtrak train would pull into the little passenger station across the street. It was the furthest thing from a typical corporate setting one could imagine.

Jim and Stephen were already used to meeting authors and signing up books in interesting places and circumstances. They had previously signed the contract for The Sauna in Rob Roy’s round, cordwood masonry sauna, trying hard not to drip sweat on it from their naked bodies. And there was even talk about arranging a meeting with Canadian author Robert Henderson in a hall in Newport Line, Vermont, which had entrances in both Canada and the U.S. (Robert’s wife, for reasons I never quite understood, was considered persona non grata in this country, and Quebec—on the other side of the building—was as close as we could get her to White River.)

Sandor arrived, looking very flamboyant in what I remember as a multicolor ring-striped sweater and corduroy pants that were very soft and velour-like in texture, and golden-mustard yellow in color. Clearly neither he nor we were going for the corporate image. He entered, carrying a jar of his homemade “kraut-chi” and a small, saddle-stitched pamphlet—the original, self-published version of Wild Fermentation. As the meeting progressed, and we passed around the jar, scooping out delicious fermented vegetables with our fingers, we became more and more impressed and fond of this bright, articulate, and passionate young man, who was part social activist, part cultural preservationist—and clearly obsessed with all things fermentable. It wasn’t a hard decision to sign up his book.

Time passed, and most of the staff turned over during a major reorganization at Chelsea Green. Our offices changed as well, moving a few hundred feet up the street to the Tip Top Building, a big open space inside what was once a production bakery and that had been converted into artists’ studios and other uses. The new, expanded edition of Wild Fermentation was one of the first titles Chelsea Green issued under our “new” Publisher, Margo Baldwin, who with her husband Ian had founded the company in 1984 and had run it for many years before taking a well-deserved break.

I remember when we opened the box containing the advance copies of Wild Fermentation. There was a stunned silence, then a mixture of bemusement and outrage. We had struggled over the cover design for a long time (“Should we have microscopic photos of bacteria on the front?”), but had opted in the end for a funky type-heavy cover. The color in the printer proofs we’d seen had been a dark forest green. Imagine our surprise then when we saw, on the front cover, a shockingly lighter, almost bilious pea green color, and a neon-pink, childrens’ chewable vitamins color in the title and on the back cover. Our first reaction was to reach for the light switch and see if the damn thing would glow in the dark.

We had no clue how this garish-looking, flamboyantly fabulous book that we were sending off into the world would sell. Fortunately, we had an equally flamboyant and fabulous author to promote it. Sandor carried this book to the four corners of the earth, tirelessly spreading the word and talking to everyone who cared to listen about the wonders of fermentation. And over the course of time, this book has grown to become a classic.

Like many of the books we have published at Chelsea Green, Wild Fermentation was way ahead of its time. Today fermentation is a “hot topic,” with everyone from self-reliant anti-government bunker dwellers to tragically urban hipsters from Brooklyn to San Francisco jumping on the bandwagon and eagerly discovering (or rediscovering) the traditional skills for transforming and preserving a wide range of foods. And with the 2012 publication of The Art of Fermentation—Sandor’s best-selling magnum opus—even more readers are now discovering Wild Fermentation, his first book. It’s the one that made it all possible, the original “culture” that started a great and growing ferment.

Chelsea Green Across the Globe

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

Here at Chelsea Green we love seeing how publishers from other parts of the world adapt our book covers for readers in their respective countries.

There are more than 150 foreign editions of Chelsea Green books in eighteen different languages, and each book has its own unique look and appeal. Each year we see more books being translated, thanks to an in-house team that travels to Frankfurt and London to meet with overseas publishers, as well as our helpful distributors in Canada, the United Kingdom, the European Union, Australia and New Zealand, and South Africa.

We’ve created a slide show containing a number of our favorite foreign covers and have two simple questions for you:

Can you recognize the U.S. edition by its foreign cover? What do you think of their interpretation?

Take a look at the photostream below OR chime in on our Facebook Page and let us know what you think.

Renewable Energy for Resilient Communities

Thursday, September 5th, 2013

How can we successfully bring our neighbors together and relocalize our food, energy, and financial systems?

To glean some of the best ideas percolating throughout the United States, and the world, sign up for the Community Resilience Chats—a webinar series that delves into details essential for communities that are ready to take the necessary steps to reclaim their future. These online discussions stem from The Community Resilience Guides co-published by Post Carbon Institute and Chelsea Green.

These online chats are co-produced by Chelsea Green, Transition US, and Post Carbon Institute.

In the next chat — Power from the People — community clean power visionaries, Lynn Benander of Co-op Power and Lyle Estill of Piedmont Biofuels will share their experiences in moving away from big energy. Join the conversation:

Community Resilience Chat: Power from the People – Webinar
September 10, 2013 at 2:00pm (EST)

The webinar is free, but space is limited so don’t wait to sign up. Participants will receive an exclusive 35% discount on Greg Pahl’s Power from the People. There will be a presentation and time for Q&A, but send in your burning questions on community clean power in advance to help shape the conversation.

If you missed the first Community Resilience Chat: Rebuilding the Foodshed with Philip Ackerman-Leist, you can watch it here:

 Next up on Community Resilience Chats: Local Dollars, Local Sense. Michael Shuman’s perspective sheds light on rebooting the economy to meet the needs of investors and entrepreneurs for a healthy and secure local economy.

Want to learn more about these books and how to make your community more self-reliant? Chelsea Green is offering  The Community Resilience Guides series as a special book set to make sure you and your neighbors have the tools and strategies you need to become more resilient.

One Million Strong for Marijuana Is Safer

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

Quick: What do one million Facebook fans and the U.S. Department of Justice have in common?

Apparently, they agree that it’s a waste of time to crack down on individual marijuana smokers. So, will the feds move toward legalization next? If they follow the leads of voters in states like Colorado and Washington, then perhaps we can end the prohibition era mentality when it comes to smoking pot.

In celebration of the Marijuana is Safer Facebook page gaining the support of more than one million fans, and the federal government’s announcement that it’s easing off it’s crackdown on individual smokers, we are offering a special discount on the updated and expanded edition of Marijuana is Safer: So Why Are We Driving People to Drink? – just use discount code MIS35 at checkout to take 35% off!

The position that marijuana is a safer alternative to alcohol is sparking a conversation in communities and legislatures across the country—forcing the media, policy makers and citizens to pay attention to this issue.

Renowned brain surgeon and CNN medical correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta recently defended and endorsed the use of marijuana in medicinal applications (and was rewarded with his very own aptly-named strand of the drug). Gupta also exposed hypocrisy of the U.S. government, and in the documentary Weed, examined the benefits and relative safety of marijuana. Between this level of exposure and growing interest in the debate, a policy shift is on the horizon.

Marijuana is Safer debunks many marijuana myths and provides research and evidence supporting the relative safety of the substance. This new edition includes the same message, but with even more research and facts, explains the Colorado victory, and lays out the talking points that can help enable change in your state and community.

Whether you’re in support or have yet to be convinced, Marijuana is Safer will educate you, open your mind, and empower you to take action.

Don’t forget to visit the Marijuana is Safer Facebook page and add your support to the one million (and counting) fans. And get Marijuana is Safer for 35% off with discount code MIS35 at checkout.

Get to know the issue. Learn about the facts. Share it with someone else. Make a difference.

We’re Hiring! Join the Team as our Online Marketing Intern

Sunday, September 1st, 2013

Chelsea Green – an employee-owned, mission-driven book publisher — is looking for a creative, book-loving, savvy Online Marketing Intern to join our growing marketing and publicity team in the company’s Burlington, VT office.

If you’re interested, please send resume and cover letter to Online Marketing Manager, Gretchen Kruesi: [email protected] No phone calls, please.

General Description

Online Marketing Intern is responsible for assisting the Online Marketing Manager in updating our consumer and media websites, working on consumer email and analytics program, and other administrative tasks as needed.

Responsibilities

• Support Online Marketing Manager including, but not limited to tasks listed below. Position will have opportunity to improve and expand skills and knowledge in website and online management.
• Assist in updating our ecommerce site (ChelseaGreen.com), keeping book data up to date and highlighting major media hits.
• Surveying website for problems and assist Online Marketing Manager to resolve quickly.
• Assist in updating media site for sales/media (Media.ChelseaGreen.com), updating book data and marketing information as needed.
• Conduct research on new authors to provide publicity background information on Media.ChelseaGreen.com.
• Update other Chelsea Green content on other platforms as needed, such as: Scribd, YouTube, affiliate sales program, etc.
• Assist Online Marketing Manager with researching potential online outlets for targeted promotion campaigns.
• Potential for other online marketing opportunities, such as: limited graphic design, video editing, etc.

Position Details: 15- 20 hrs/week for 4 months with possible extension, paid $10/hour, based in Burlington, Vermont.

Reports to: Online Marketing Manager

Qualifications: This is a position for someone with a demonstrated interest in website management and marketing. Experience with Adobe Creative Suite and basic HTML and is required. The qualified candidate will be able to work within a team environment as well as work independently. Comfort with other multimedia experience and using Google Analytics and other online tracking software is helpful, but not required. Detailed oriented, reliable, strong computer skills and proficiency in Excel is essential. Successful applicant will have an opportunity to learn new skills and expand knowledge base.

About Us: For almost 30 years, Chelsea Green has been the go-to publisher for people seeking foundational books on the politics and practice of sustainable living, including organic gardening and agriculture, renewable energy, green building, eco-cuisine, and ethical business. In 2012, we decided to practice what we publish and became employee-owned. We are a founding member of the Green Press Initiative and have been printing books on recycled paper since 1985, when our first list of books went on sale. We print our books on paper that consists of a minimum of 30 percent post-consumer waste and aim for 100 percent whenever possible. We also don’t print our books overseas, but rather use domestic printers to keep our shipping costs (and impact on the environment) at a minimum.

Recipe: The Honey Wine of Legend

Monday, August 26th, 2013

Mead, or fermented honey, may be the oldest alcoholic beverage out there. The collection of honey predates agricultural practices and appears across most cultures in some form.

Take it from your ancestors – this sweet libation, often used in ceremony or celebration, is a gift from the gods.

The following recipe is from Full Moon Feast: Food and the Hunger for Connection by Jessica Prentice.

At the height of summer, when the days are long and the Earth is in bloom, we enter the lunar cycle known in sixteenth-century England as the Mead Moon. The beehives are heavy with honey made from the pollen of spring and summer flowers, and honey was the crucial ingredient for making mead—the honey wine of legend, myth, and human history brewed from the precious produce of industrious bees.

Mellow Mead

Makes 2 quarts

This lacto-fermented mead has very little alcohol but showcases the flavor of honey, and is delicious. Mead was traditionally drunk on the summer solstice.

  • 2/3 cup raw, unfiltered honey
  • 1 1/2 cups filtered water, very warm (about 110°F)
  • 6 cups filtered water
  • 1/2 cup kefir grains—rinsed grains from making milk kefir, or water kefir grains
  1. Pour the honey into a clean, 2-quart mason jar.
  2. Pour the hot water over the honey and stir to dissolve.
  3. Pour the rest of the filtered water into the jar.
  4. Add the kefir grains.
  5. Cover the jar and put it in a warm place for 1 week.
  6. Strain into two glass bottles with screw tops. I use the bottles from the mineral water Gerolsteiner. Put an even amount into both bottles. If they are 1-quart bottles, they should be full; if they are 1-liter bottles, add enough water to fill to the top. Screw the lids on tightly, label and date the bottles, and return to the warm place for another week.
  7. Transfer to the fridge. Once they are cold you can enjoy them anytime! When you are ready to drink the mead, open the bottles carefully because they may have built up a lot of carbonation. Open them outside or over a sink. Turn the lid very slowly to see if the drink begins to release foam. If so, then allow it to release some of the carbon dioxide by not opening the bottle all the way and letting out some of the pressure, then opening it more and more, bit by bit. This way you won’t lose your drink to its carbonation.

Hurricane Irene: The Road to Resiliency

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

Two years ago Hurricane Irene ravaged Vermont—displaced families, isolated communities, and washed away homes, roads and bridges.

Many communities and families are still rebuilding from the devastation caused by this powerful storm—a storm that hit Vermont harder than almost any other state.

Could much of the damage caused by Hurricane Irene—and similar storms—be prevented by implementing some basic permaculture principles on open land? Below, Ben Falk convincingly argues that point using video from his research farm taken during Hurricane Irene to show how swales can productively retain water on farmland.

Hurricane Irene and Swales at the WSRF from Ben Falk on Vimeo.

Nothing defines the nature of a place more than water. The quantity, qualities, forms, distribution, and intensity of its entry into a landscape determine nearly everything else that happens ecologically in a place,” Falk writes in his recent book The Resilient Farm and Homestead. “Though there are many physical aspects of a place, including the type of bedrock, soils, and climate, it is the play of water that most directly determines an ecosystem’s behavior and capacity for production or regeneration. Thus, the most optimal design within which to fit human activities in a place start and end with water.”

As we continue to rebuild and look for ways to become more resilient in the wake of these powerful, and unpredictable, storms, Falk urges us to consider how we can slow, spread and sink our water according to the condition, climate and needs of the landscape.

Though we cannot always accurately predict the weather, we can prepare to endure anomalies with care and consideration in our design.

August 29, 2013: Farm and Homestead Resiliency Strategies with Ben Falk
As part of their Summer Workshop Series, NOFA-VT and Ben Falk host a tour and report on the Whole Systems Design Research Farm. Register for the workshop and start preparing your pressing permaculture questions!


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