Chelsea Green News Archive


Raids, Crackdowns, and Armed Seizures: What Consumers Confront to Access Real Food

Monday, June 17th, 2013

Here’s the scenario: You decide to start selling the goods from your farm so that your community can enjoy fresh, unprocessed food from a local source. Somehow, the government finds out. How do they respond? Do they…

A)  Applaud you for your entrepreneurial spirit?
B)  Ask you to help them spread the word about other cow shares and co-ops in the area?
C)  Tell you that you could face jail time for privately selling food to local consumers?
D)  Take you away in handcuffs?

If you guessed A or B, wrong! If you’re Rawesome Foods, your answer is D. If you’re Alvin Shlangen or Amish dairy farmer Vernon Hershberger, then the government handed you C (in the form of a lawsuit).

Think you control the right to choose what you eat? Think again. “In the name of food safety…the U.S. government has declared war on people who would dare to exercise their most fundamental human right to choose their food,” writes Joel Salatin in the Foreword to Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Food Rights by journalist David E. Gumpert.

Salatin continues, “The fact that neither the Declaration of Independence nor the U.S. Constitution ever mentions the word food indicates that it was such a ubiquitous and common part of human experience that the framers of our country couldn’t imagine its restriction. Like air for breathing or sunshine for growing plants.”

This unprecedented government regulation and control has spurred activists and eaters across the country to cry out against such crackdowns and demand the right to choose what they put in their bodies.

Why are hard-working normally law-abiding farmers aligning with urban and suburban consumers to flaunt well-established food safety regulations and statutes? Why are parents, who want only the best for their children, seeking out food that regulators say could be dangerous? And, why are regulators and prosecutors feeling so threatened by this trend?

This erosion in the confidence of the food system carries serious implications. It financially threatens large corporations if long-established food brands come under prolonged and severe public questioning. It threatens economic performance if foods deemed “safe” become scarcer, and thus more expensive. And it is potentially explosive politically if too many people lose confidence in the professionalism of the food regulators who are supposed to be protecting us from tainted food, and encourages folks to exit the public food system for private solutions like the consumers in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Maine, and elsewhere. Just look at the vituperative corporate response to recent consumer-led campaigns to label foods with genetically-modified ingredients.

As more consumers become intent on making the final decisions on what foods they are going to feed themselves and their families, and regulators become just as intent on asserting what they see as their authority over inspecting and licensing all food, ugly scenarios of agitated citizens battling government authorities over access to food staples seem likely to proliferate. It’s a recipe for a new kind of rights movement centered on the most basic acts—what we choose to eat.

“With incredible clarity and masterful storytelling, David Gumpert leads us on a journey into the trenches of America’s battle over food rights,” writes Ben Hewitt, author of The Town That Food Saved: How One Community Found Vitality in Local Food. “No one knows this terrain and understands the implications as thoroughly as Gumpert, and the result is a book that will by turns enrage and inspire you. The battle for the right to nourish our bodies with real food must be won, and this book is an essential part of making that happen.”

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Food Rights: The Escalating Battle Over Who Decides What We Eat is available now and on sale for 35% off.

Read the Introduction below.

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Food Rights: Introduction by Chelsea Green Publishing

Compost This Book! A Q&A with Gary Paul Nabhan on Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land

Wednesday, June 12th, 2013

In his new book, Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land, author Gary Paul Nabhan draws on the knowledge and expertise of traditional and visionary desert farmers, compiling stories of resilience and adaptation that urge readers to plan for uncertainty, acquire knowledge, and take action.

The following exchange between Nabhan and Chelsea Green Senior Editor Ben Watson—who worked with Nabhan on Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land —covers a variety of topics, including how this book is for farmers and gardeners of all sizes and regions, and why there’s hope in a time when it would seem all too easy to succumb to despair.

Ben Watson: What does global climate change have to do with America’s failure to produce more food than its people consume for the third straight year?

Gary Nabhan: For starters, we had more than 2,200 counties declared national drought disaster areas in 2012, four times more than in 2011. Farmers applied for $13 billion dollars of federal insurance due to crop failures and reduced yields, more than twice the running average per year. Increasingly unprecedented climatic disruption is affecting farmers, ranchers, foragers and fishers more than ever before, and yet big agriculture’s lobbyists like the American Farm Bureau Federation deny that we’re entering a “new normal.” Sadly, that disadvantages its own rank and file members by not developing programs that prevent crop failure, as if crop insurance for more failed farms will be sufficient.

BW: Can farmers and food producers really do anything significant to combat or even lessen the effects of climate change?

GN: Absolutely. More than any other human activity that both contributes to and is negatively impacted by climate change, farming has tremendous capacity to both reduce its carbon footprint and adapt to changing conditions. Farmers can do so by using a wider range of crop and livestock diversity to buffer themselves from uncertainty, and by adapting and ramping up strategies for reducing the impacts of heat and drought that traditional desert food producers have employed for centuries, if not millennia.

BW: In writing this book, you’ve drawn upon the traditional knowledge of native and immigrant farmers from around the world — people who have learned how to deal with climate uncertainty. How did you find them?

GN: Since 1978 or so, I have been fortunate enough to occasionally travel on work to nearly every other desert in the world, where I tried to pay keen attention to what indigenous and immigrant farmers were doing to deal with drought, heat, salinization and scarcity of fresh water for irrigation.  When I saw what looked to be an oasis-like mirage in the desert, I sought it out and found remarkably resilient, intelligent farmers there.  Thirty-five years later, I’m humbled by how much they have tried to teach me that perhaps all of us now need to know.

BW: Is this book primarily for farmers or gardeners? In other words, at what scale are these strategies applicable?

GN: I’d hate to see these strategies relegated only to a backyard garden in some desert region.  I’d like to see farmers and gardeners everywhere—not just in historically arid regions—take stock of these remarkably diverse adaptations to climate uncertainty. They may need to scale them up and adapt them to their own peculiar conditions, but as far as I can see, there will be no silver bullet like a climate-friendly GMO that is going to save us. We need to diversify our strategies and scales for agricultural production if we are to regain some modicum of food security.

BW:  In your opinion, what is driving climate change more: on-farm carbon “foodprints” or the carbon foodprint of our global supply and distribution system?

GN: The latter—on-farming fossil fuel accounts for less than one-fifth of all energy expenditure in our entire food system, but it’s an expenditure of energy that we can dramatically reduce through creative solutions that will improve rather than harm farmer’s bottom line. And consumers at large should help farmers transition to more energy- and water-efficient practices, as well as dealing with similar problems in the ways they store, process and consume food at home.

BW: Do you have cause for either hope or despair as we pass beyond the carbon level of 400 parts per million in Earth’s atmosphere?

GN: As the saying goes, I’m an intellectual pessimist but a glandular optimist. Every time I get my hands dirty outside and try to solve the problems in my own orchard and garden, I find hope lurking in the emerging greenery. If we simply sit on our butts all day in an office and wring our hands, not much will get done. So read my book quickly, then compost it, and with what you’ve learned, plant something fresh in it!

Gary Paul Nabhan will be speaking at Shelburne Farms Thursday, June 27. Register here.

Save 35% on Our Recent Spring Releases

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

Resilience, Regeneration, and Rights — these are the three “Rs” covered by several recent releases.

Whether you want to read an in-depth guide to personal preparedness and homestead resiliency; how to grow food in hotter, drier climates; save money (and the environment) with a green home makeover; or learn more about the emerging battle over food sovereignty in the U.S., we have the right book for you.

Since 1984, Chelsea Green has published books at the vanguard of sustainable living and our latest offerings keep that tradition alive and thriving. Aside from the three most recent releases featured below, check out additional sale titles from our Spring list to inspire you in your backyard or your community.

Happy reading from the folks at Chelsea Green Publishing!

P.S. In case you missed it, The New York Times profiled The New Horse-Powered Farm and its author Stephen Leslie in a feature about draft power as a re-emerging trend in farming. You can see Leslie at work in the fields with his Fjord’s in this special Times slideshow

The Resilient Farm and Homestead: An Innovative Permaculture and Whole Systems Design Approach

The Resilient Farm and Homestead Cover
Retail: $40.00
Discount: $26.00

The Resilient Farm and Homestead will be essential reading for the serious prepper as well as for everyone interested in creating a more resilient lifestyle or landscape.”—Carol Deppe, author of The Resilient Gardener

“This intelligent, challenging book, rooted somewhere between back-to-the-land idealism and radical survivalism, sees resilience as both planting and building for the use of future generations …. ”—Publisher’s Weekly, Starred Review

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Food Rights: The Escalating Battle Over Who Decides What We Eat

ife, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Food Rights Cover
Retail: $19.95
Discount: $
12.97

Foreword by Joel Salatin

“With incredible clarity and masterful storytelling, David Gumpert leads us on a journey into the trenches of America’s battle over food rights … the result is a book that will by turns enrage and inspire you. The battle for the right to nourish our bodies with real food must be won, and this book is an essential part of making that happen.” —Ben Hewitt, author of The Town That Food Saved

 

Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land: Lessons from Desert Farmers on Adapting to Climate Uncertainty

Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land Cover
Retail: $29.95
Discount: $19.47

Foreword by Bill McKibben

“Gary Nabhan’s latest book is indispensable. Everyone who grows food—make that, everyone who eats food—should be grateful he wrote it. An homage to old wisdom and to the latter-day soil magicians who are Nabhan’s living muses, it is a rich herbarium of delicious, hardy sustenance and a manual for our future.”—Alan Weisman, author, The World Without Us 

New Books: 35% Off Until June 19th

The Greened House Effect Cover

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Cows Save the Planet Cover

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Good Morning, Beautiful Business Cover

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The New Horse-Powered Farm Cover

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Perennial Vegetable Gardening DVD Cover

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Holistic Orcharding DVD Cover

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The Grafter's Handbook Cover

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The Organic Seed Grower Cover

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Slow Wine Cover

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Cheese and Culture Cover

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Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on  sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied.

Calling all Preppers, Permies, and Perennial Homesteaders

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

Want to grow rice in your backyard? How about warming up in your very own compost-heated hot tub?

Imagine if where you lived was not simply a passive landscape, but a living, growing habitat. That’s the reality for Ben Falk and his team at Whole Systems Research Farm in Vermont’s Mad River Valley.

Falk is a land designer and site developer at Whole Systems Design, LLC where, by imitating natural systems and utilizing regenerative techniques, his land can adapt to the challenges presented by climate change.

Inspired by a decade of experience, Falk has written a handbook invaluable for anyone who wishes to create working systems that allow them to live in harmony with their land and the natural environment, while preparing for the inevitable climate uncertainty of the future.

Permaculture Activist’s Peter Bane writes, “This book is tightly argued and rich with information…The discussion of living well on the edge of a shaky economy ranges across a vast terrain from the weight of firewood to detailing of buildings that last to making medicine from plants and fungi in the garden.”

The Resilient Farm and Homestead: An Innovative Permaculture and Whole Systems Design Approach offers working, tested results and practical information on a variety of topics, including:

• Landshaping;
• Water security;
• Perennial crops;
• Soil fertility;
• Nutrient-dense foods, and more.

“The Resilient Farm and Homestead weaves together permaculture theory as modified by actual practice on a ten-acre Vermont farm with a thorough preparedness guide for times of climate change and greater uncertainties of all kinds and sizes,” writes Carol Deppe, author of The Resilient Gardener: Food Production and Self-Reliance in Uncertain Times. “This book will be essential reading for the serious prepper as well as for everyone interested in creating a more resilient lifestyle or landscape.”

The Resilient Farm and Homestead is available now, and on sale for 35% off. Read Chapter 1 below.

Chapter 1: Creating a Positive Legacy while Adapting to Rapid Change

How to Survive the Apocalypse: Growing Food in a Changing Climate

Wednesday, May 29th, 2013

Growing food in the hottest, driest corners of America is no longer confined to small regions of North America. What to do?

More than half of all counties in the United States are now on the USDA’s list of natural disaster areas, according to one recent Grist article, and that list is expected to expand this year. “As global warming unfolds, knowledge of dryland agriculture will become increasingly valuable,” writes Brie Mazurek.

Drawing on the knowledge and expertise of traditional and visionary desert farmers is exactly what author and local food pioneer Gary Paul Nabhan has done in his latest book, Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land. Nabhan has compiled stories of resilience and adaptation that urge readers to plan for uncertainty, acquire knowledge, and take action.

As environmentalist Bill McKibben mentions in the book’s foreword, drought, paired with rising global temperatures, is having devastating effects on the wellbeing of crops and livestock.

“We’ve raised the planet’s temperature a degree so far, but that’s just the start,” writes McKibben. “Unless we get off coal and gas and oil…the temperature will rise…past the point where agronomists think we can support the kind of civilizations we now enjoy.”

Even if we can’t escape climate change, we can do our best to adapt to it, argues Nabhan. Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land: Lessons from Desert Farmers on Adapting to Climate Uncertainty includes tips on how to:

• Build greater moisture-holding capacity and nutrients in soils;
• Protect fields from damaging winds, drought, and floods;
• Reduce heat stress on crops and livestock;
• Harvest water from uplands to use in rain gardens and terraces filled with perennial crops;
• Select fruits, nuts, succulents, and herbaceous perennials that are best suited to warmer, drier climates; and,
• Keep pollinators in pace and in place with arid-adapted crop plants.

If there was ever a moment for this book, now is it,” McKibben writes. “We’ve thought ourselves wise for several generations now, but in fact that wisdom has been a simplifying kind. Now we’re going to need exactly the kind of complex, place-based wisdom that Nabhan outlines here. We’re going to have to wise up, in a hurry. And the biggest part of that wisdom will involve realizing that we depend on others.”

The rain may indeed be dying, as a Sonoran Desert farmer once told Nabhan, but there is hope. If a piece of desert land can be healed and restored to a food-producing oasis, perhaps hope for a food-secure future can be restored as well.

Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land is available now and on sale for 35% off. Read the Introduction below.What are you doing to adapt to a changing climate? Share your stories with us on Facebook and Twitter.

Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land: Introduction

Seeds, Cheese, Slow Money, and More! Join us at the Mother Earth News Fair.

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013

The Internet is great. We can share tips and tricks, and trade secrets without even leaving our homes. But there’s no replacement for good, old-fashioned camaraderie, and nobody knows that better than Mother Earth News.

If you’re a homesteader, small-farmer, or gardener, you need to check out the Mother Earth News Fair near you. From speakers and workshops to vendors and livestock breeders, the Mother Earth News Fairs draw thousands of sustainability-minded, curious, self-reliant folks.

And of course, a full slate of Chelsea Green authors will be among their ranks!

Join us at the first Mother Earth News Fair of the season in Puyallup, WA on June 1 & 2. Communications Director Shay Totten will be there to answer questions, and the following authors will be leading workshops and giving keynote speeches:

  • Gary Paul Nabhan: Keynote – Adapting Food Production to Climate Change
  • Woody Tasch: Keynote – Slow Money: Investing as if food, farms and fertility matter
  • Gianaclis Caldwell: Workshops – Living the Dream: Building a small cheese dairy; Quick and Simple Cheeses; Yogurt: Marvels and making
  • John Navazio
  • Joel Salatin: Keynote – Don’t be Scared, Be Strange; plus a Live Poultry Processing Demo

See you at the Fair!

The New Horse-Powered Farm Featured in The New York Times

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

Across the nation, farmers are returning to an age-old technology that’s at the cutting edge of sustainable agriculture: horse-power.

Why? Simple. It’s better for the land, and better for the soul.

Author of The New Horse-Powered Farm Stephen Leslie, says it best in his The New York Times profile: “From an ecological standpoint, it’s just so clean, versus burning fossil fuel, and the compaction you get with a tractor,” he said. “But on that other level, there is just this unending learning curve that keeps you engaged. It’s a window into an instinctual world that is also entirely present. When I’m with the horses they are entirely present to me and to the task at hand. ‘Here we are, this is it, this is what we’re doing.’ And if I’m not grounded, things go off in the wrong direction.”

Last month, while Leslie was just getting started with spring chores, Anne Raver of The New York Times paid him a visit. Make sure to see Leslie and his Fjord’s in action in the NYT’s slideshow.

~~~~~~~~

Farm Equipment That Runs on Oats

By ANNE RAVER
Photo Credit: Stacey Cramp for The New York Times

HARTLAND, Vt. — It was a perfect day for plowing, a little overcast with a cool breeze. You could hear the sound of the birds, the chink-chink-chink of the harness.

Stephen Leslie, an artist and former Benedictine monk, guided two Norwegian Fjords down the field. The walking moldboard plow, a 300-pound curving steel blade, cut through the soil and sent it curling over itself in dark, crumbly waves. He stepped quickly, leaning back into the lines he kept looped around his shoulders so his hands were free to guide the plow.

“Stay haw, stay haw,” Mr. Leslie said in a low, calm voice, reminding the dun-colored horses to bear right as they neared the end of the field. Full grown at 14 hands high and 950 pounds, these powerful animals can be dangerous if they are startled. But compared with Clydesdales or Percherons, which are twice as big and can weigh as much as 2,500 pounds, they look like big, muscular ponies.

“Gee now, gee,” he said, urging them left as they stepped onto the unplowed grass at the edge of the field. “Easy now, easy.”

Farming with horses is a complicated dance in which timing is all. But Cassima, 19, and Tristan, 14, have been with Mr. Leslie for most of their lives (Fjords can live as long as three decades), so years of trust bind them. And theirs is a breed that wants to work.

“These guys are really easygoing compared to a thoroughbred, or even a Morgan horse,” he said. “But they’re lively, and they can be willful.”

Mr. Leslie, 52, and his wife, Kerry Gawalt, 38, use a tractor to haul manure and do other heavy jobs here on Cedar Mountain Farm. But when it comes to working the land, they use four Norwegian Fjords. Their farm is one of some 400,000 operations in North American that use draft horses in some capacity, estimates Lynn Miller, the editor of the Small Farmer’s Journal, in Sisters, Ore., who has farmed with horses for more than 40 years.

After World War II, when farmers traded in tens of millions of horses for tractors — “There was no place for the horses except the glue factory,” Mr. Miller said — the use of draft horses plummeted. By the 1970s, some of the breeds that had been the most popular were down to the thousands.

But “since then, the number of work horses and draft mules has steadily climbed,” said Mr. Miller, who has written more than a dozen books on the subject. “People are attracted to the way of working with animals, of being back in touch with nature, of regaining a kind of rhythmic elegance to our lives.”

Keep reading…

The Most Revolutionary Agricultural System You’ve Never Heard Of: Permaculture Titles 35% Off

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

Want a great garden? Take a page out of Nature’s book and you’ll find growing food is easier than you ever imagined.

Permaculture is a system of ecological design that you can apply to gardens, farms, and even entire homesteads. By teaching you how to mimic natural processes, recycle nutrients, use animals wisely, and use energy efficiently, permaculture paves the way for you to live lightly on the earth, in harmony with the plants and creatures that feed you.

Learn more about this simple but revolutionary system with these groundbreaking books—35% off for a limited time. 

Happy reading from the folks at Chelsea Green Publishing!

Desert or Paradise: Restoring Endangered Landscapes Using Water Management, Including Lake and Pond Construction

Desert or Paradise Cover
Retail: $29.95
Discount: $19.47

Rebel farmer Sepp Holzer explains his revolutionary methods of water landscaping in Desert or Paradise. Drawn from his work around the world, Desert or Paradise shows the dramatic restoration of arid lands using little more than careful planning and simple earth dams to store water in the soil.

 

 

Paradise Lot: Two Plant Geeks, One-Tenth of an Acre, and the Making of an Edible Garden Oasis in the City

Paradise Lot Cover
Retail: $19.95
Discount: $12.97

 

Paradise Lot  tells the story of how two permaculture geeks transformed a barren urban lot—and found love along the way. Eric Toensmeier’s story will inspire you to see the potential in any neglected place, and show you what’s possible if you listen to nature and never give up.

 

 

 

Gaia’s Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture

Gaia's Garden Cover
Retail: $29.95
Discount: $19.47

 

Gaia’s Garden  was the first book to bring permaculture to the home-garden scale, and has become a trusted gardening classic. Learn how to design an ecological garden for your yard, with information on plant guilds, herb spirals, interplanting, composting and more.

 

 

The Resilient Farm and Homestead: An Innovative Permaculture and Whole Systems Design Approach

Gaia's Garden Cover

Available May 31stRetail: $40.00Discount: $26.00

With practical information on landshaping, water security, perennial crops, soil fertility, nutrient-dense food, and more, The Resilient Farm and Homestead is a manual for developing durable, beautiful, and highly functional human habitat systems fit to handle an age of rapid transition.

‘The mix of resources, practical advice, and land design offered here is a strong starting point for anyone interested in regenerative agriculture and modern homesteading.’—ForeWord Reviews

 

Permaculture Sale: 35% Off

Edible Forest Gardens Set Cover

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A Forest Garden Year DVD Cover

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Getting Started in Permaculture Cover

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Earth Care Manual Cover

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Books on Sale until May 22nd. Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on

sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after

the discount is applied.

The Art of Fermentation: James Beard Award Winner!

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

Congratulations are in order to Sandor Ellix Katz, aka Sandorkraut. His groundbreaking book The Art of Fermentation has just won a James Beard Foundation Book Award!

Covering all aspects of the industry—from chefs and restaurateurs to cookbook authors and food journalists to restaurant designers and architects and more—the Beard Awards are the highest honor for food and beverage professionals working in North America. Think of them as the Oscars of the food world.

The Art of Fermentation won in the Reference and Scholarship category, making it Chelsea Green’s first ever James Beard award winner. We’ve had only one prior nominee, which was The Bread Builders in 2000.

The beautiful book reflects Katz’s years of research, teaching, and passionate proselytizing of the wonders of homemade ferments, and welcomes both new and seasoned fermentos alike into the simple magic of this ancient food processing technique.

The Art of Fermentation spent two weeks on the New York Times Bestseller list when it was first published, and we are close to printing our 50,000th copy—remarkable for a 500-plus page hardcover book about fermentation. In addition, Sandor’s work is featured prominently in Michael Pollan’s new best-selling book Cooked.

We’re proud to be Sandor Katz’s publisher, and to help spread the word about the joys of microbial coexistence. Ferment on, everyone!

We’re Hiring! Join the Team as Our Next Web Editor

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

Chelsea Green – an employee-owned, mission-driven book publisher — is looking for a creative, book-loving, savvy Web Editor to join our growing marketing and publicity team in the company’s Burlington, VT office.

If you’re interested, please send resume and cover letter to Communications Director Shay Totten: [email protected] No phone calls, please.

General Description

The Web Editor is responsible for ensuring that our consumer and media websites are up to date, and is responsible for drafting and then implementing the creative content for our social media channels, as well as our consumer email program.

Responsibilities

Manage our ecommerce site (ChelseaGreen.com), keeping book data up to date and highlighting major media hits.

Plan and compose postings for the ChelseaGreen.com front page.

  • Report website problems promptly, assist Online Marketing Manager and developers to resolve quickly
  • Manage special media site for sales (Media.ChelseaGreen.com), updating book data and marketing information as needed.
  • Conduct research on new authors to provide publicity background information on Media.ChelseaGreen.com.

Manage postings and interaction on Chelsea Green’s social media platforms.

  • Track and respond to social media statistics to ensure high quality, and high levels of interaction on all platforms.
  • Provide monthly reports to key staff and managers.
  • Manage Chelsea Green content on other platforms as needed, such as Scribd.

Draft Chelsea Green’s consumer and specialty email newsletters under direction of Communications Director and Online Marketing Manager.

  • Draft the list of books to promote, collect links and image URLs, as needed.
  • Re-code email html as needed to convert for ChelseaGreen.com web posting.
  • Draft promotional test subject lines, and marketing copy, for each consumer and specialty email.
  • Complete simple graphic design in support of social media marketing and publicity efforts, including press releases, staff business cards, and consumer ads.
  • Assist Online Marketing Manager with maintaining a list of potential online outlets for targeted promotion campaigns along with management of the ShareSale program.

Research and draft content topics posted to the company’s blog, social media, and multimedia channels for maximum SEO, reach, branding, and effectiveness.

Monitor emerging, and existing, trends and best practices in SEO, social media and other online marketing strategies.

Work with the Online Marketing Manager to develop strategies to grow our online marketing outreach through our direct email program, website, social media, and more.

Position Details: Full-time salaried position, based in Burlington, Vermont. Spends one day a week in the White River Junction, Vermont office.

Reports to: Communications Director

Qualifications: This is a position for someone with a demonstrated interest in online publishing and marketing and an interest in our company mission. The qualified candidate will be able to work within a team environment as well as work independently, and be responsible for tracking and monitoring their goals and objectives. One to two years experience multimedia publishing helpful. Must have: strong communication, writing, and interpersonal skills; ability to work in fast-paced, deadline-driven environment; Bachelor’s degree; strong computer skills and proficiency in Word and Excel; comfort with using Google Analytics and other online tracking software; proficiency in social media, and comfortable with administrative tasks. HTML and other multimedia experience is helpful, as is being familiar with Adobe Creative Suite – PhotoShop Dreamweaver, InDesign and Acrobat.

About Us: For almost 30 years, Chelsea Green has been the go-to publisher for people seeking foundational books on the politics and practice of sustainable living, including organic gardening and agriculture, renewable energy, green building, eco-cuisine, and ethical business. In 2012, we decided to practice what we publish and became employee-owned. We are a founding member of the Green Press Initiative and have been printing books on recycled paper since 1985, when our first list of books went on sale. We print our books on paper that consists of a minimum of 30 percent post-consumer waste and aim for 100 percent whenever possible. We also don’t print our books overseas, but rather use domestic printers to keep our shipping costs (and impact on the environment) at a minimum.


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