- Chelsea Green - http://www.chelseagreen.com/content -

Animal ID System May Cripple Small Farmers While Rewarding Factory Farms

Posted By dpacheco On March 11, 2009 @ 2:53 pm In Food & Health,Garden & Agriculture | No Comments

The New York Times yesterday featured an op-ed [1] by author Shannon Hayes [2] (The Farmer and the Grill: A Guide to Grilling, Barbecuing and Spit-Roasting Grassfed Meat…and for saving the planet one bite at a time [3]) on a proposed “National Animal Identification System [4].” Under this system, every animal would need to be tagged with an electronic chip, making it easier to pinpoint the source of an outbreak of disease. It’s meant to alleviate people’s fears of a mad cow outbreak.

The reality is that making such a system mandatory would end up, in effect, rewarding the factory farms that are the sources of such disease and crippling very small family farms. The equipment is prohibitively expensive, and in practice would be a logistical nightmare (not to mention dangerous—just try getting between a sow and her piglets).

Shades of Mad Sheep, anyone?

AT first glance, the plan by the federal Department of Agriculture to battle disease among farm animals is a technological marvel: we farmers tag every head of livestock in the country with ID chips and the department electronically tracks the animals’ whereabouts. If disease breaks out, the department can identify within 48 hours which animals are ill, where they are, and what other animals have been exposed.

At a time when diseases like mad cow and bird flu have made consumers worried about food safety, being able to quickly track down the cause of an outbreak seems like a good idea. Unfortunately, the plan, which is called the National Animal Identification System and is the subject of a House subcommittee hearing today, would end up rewarding the factory farms whose practices encourage disease while crippling small farms and the local food movement.

For factory farms, the costs of following the procedures for the system would be negligible. These operations already use computer technology, and under the system, swine and poultry that move through a production chain at the same time could be given a single number. On small, traditional farms like my family’s, each animal would require its own number. That means the cost of tracking 1,000 animals moving together through a factory system would be roughly equal to the expense that a small farmer would incur for tracking one animal.

These ID chips are estimated to cost $1.50 to $3 each, depending on the quantity purchased. A rudimentary machine to read the tags may be $100 to $200. It is expected that most reporting would have to be done online (requiring monthly Internet fees), then there would be the fee for the database subscription; together that would cost about $500 to $1,000 (conservatively) per year per premise. I estimate the combined cost for our farm at $10,000 annually — that’s 10 percent of our gross receipts.

Imagine the reporting nightmare we would face each May, when 100 ewes give birth to 200 lambs out on pasture, and then six weeks later, when those pastures are grazed off and the entire flock must be herded a mile up the road to a second farm that we rent.

Add to that the arrival every three weeks of 300 chicks, the three 500-pound sows that will each give birth to about 10 piglets out in the pastures twice per year (and that will attack anyone who comes near their babies more fiercely than a junkyard pit bull), then a batch of 100 baby turkeys, and the free-roaming laying hens. Additional tagging and record-keeping would be required for the geese and guinea fowl that nest somewhere behind the barn and in the hedgerows, occasionally visiting the neighbors’ farms, hatching broods of goslings and keets that run wild all summer long.

Read the whole article here. [1]


Article printed from Chelsea Green: http://www.chelseagreen.com/content

URL to article: http://www.chelseagreen.com/content/animal-id-system-may-cripple-small-farms-while-rewarding-factory-farms/

URLs in this post:

[1] an op-ed: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/11/opinion/11hayes.html?_r=2

[2] Shannon Hayes: http://www.chelseagreen.com/authors/shannon_hayes

[3] The Farmer and the Grill: A Guide to Grilling, Barbecuing and Spit-Roasting Grassfed Meat…and for saving the planet one bite at a time: http://www.chelseagreen.com/index/bookstore/item/the_farmer_and_the_grill/

[4] National Animal Identification System: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Animal_Identification_System#cite_note-10

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