Archive for June, 2013


Watch Live: The Necessary (r)Evolution for Sustainable Food Systems Conference

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

Want to know how to create a climate-resilient foodshed? Interested in all things fermented? How about exploring the links between farmers and consumers?

Join Chelsea Green authors Sandor Katz, author of the New York Times Bestseller and Beard Foundation Book Award winner The Art of Fermentation and Gary Paul Nabhan, author of the recently-released Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land, and many more food revolutionaries.

Live streaming begins: Thursday, June 27 at 1:00pm (EST)

Live video for mobile from Ustream

Un-Coop your Poop: Everything you Need to Know about Chicken Tractors

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

If you’re keeping your laying hens in a stationary coop, you’re missing out on their incredible soil building talents. Un-coop that chicken poop by putting your flock in a mobile shelter! Not only will a mobile shelter — or chicken tractor — allow you to effortlessly spread valuable manure, the hens themselves will till it in for you with their strong claws. Plus they’ll eat up all the pests they can find, and keep your grass mowed.

To put your ladies to work and give them a movable feast the whole barnyard will envy, you need to build the perfect chicken tractor: one that’s secure enough to keep hens safe from predators, but easy enough to move that you’ll be happy to do it every day.

Harvey Ussery explains the ins and outs of mobile shelters in this excerpt from his new classic The Small-Scale Poultry Flock.

Un-Coop Your Poop: Build a Chicken Tractor by Chelsea Green Publishing

Sustainable, Socially Responsible Start-Ups: Your Guide to Creating a Successful Food-Based Business

Monday, June 24th, 2013

It’s not uncommon for desk-chained daydreamers to spend hours thinking of quitting their jobs and pursuing their real dreams—whether those dreams involve starting a small family farm, opening a bakery, or something else entirely. But to do this you need—among other things—money. Lack of access to start-up capital deters many would-be entrepreneurs from doing the things they really want to do.

It shouldn’t be so hard for socially responsible, sustainable businesses to get their work off the ground, but unfortunately that’s often the case. Small businesses face a significant economic disadvantage in the marketplace. “Put another way, our capital markets are like a Mob-run casino,” writes Michael Shuman in the Foreword, “with the dice loaded to provide a huge edge to global business and undercut community-based businesses.”

Enter Elizabeth U. In Raising Dough, U, a social finance expert and founder of Finance for Food, lays out what you need to start a successful, socially responsible, food-based business.

“Elizabeth U has created a formidable one-stop guide to the brass tacks of building a successful sustainable food business,” writes Anna Lappe, founder of Real Food Media Projects and author of Diet for a Hot Planet. “For everyone who’s ever wanted to turn their passion for sustainable food into a thriving business, this book is for you.”

Through case studies and personal expertise, U outlines the necessary tools and options every socially responsible entrepreneur needs to be aware of before starting a business, including:

  • Different types of crowd-funding;
  • Fundraising laws;
  • Grants and other available capital options;
  • What to look for in a business partner;
  • How to choose an appropriate model; and more.

“Chances are good that you’re reading this book because you’re a farmer or local food entrepreneur looking for money,” Shuman writes in the Foreword. “Or you might be an investor looking to place your money in a local food business. Or perhaps you’re just interested in learning about how to start a food business. Or maybe you’ve just heard that this is a tremendous resource for anyone interested in local investing. Whatever your mission, prepare for a feast ahead.”

Raising Dough: The Complete Guide to Financing a Socially Responsible Food Business is available now and on sale for 35% off.

Read the Introduction below.

 

Raising Dough Introduction by Chelsea Green Publishing

Leading the Necessary (r)Evolution for Sustainable Food Systems

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Want to know how to create a climate-resilient foodshed? Interested in all things fermented? How about exploring the links between farmers and consumers?

Join Chelsea Green authors Sandor Katz, author of the New York Times Bestseller and Beard Foundation Book Award winner The Art of Fermentation and Gary Paul Nabhan, author of the recently-released Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land, and many more food revolutionaries, including Tanya Fields.

Chelsea Green is proud to be one of the partners of this important summit, in an effort to foster the exchange of ideas, inspire each other into collective action, and create positive change.

You can check out an interview with Tanya Fields here, along with an interview with Gary Paul Nabhan here.

The University of Vermont is hosting a Food Systems Summit next week, and Chelsea Green will host a live stream viewing party of the conference on our website. We hope you’ll join us online, or if you’re near UVM – come by in person.

Here are the full summit details:

Public Conference Thursday, June 27, 2013

Time: 1:00pm-6:00pm

Influential thinkers and positive change makers will exchange their best ideas to inspire, focus, and strengthen individual and collective action for a sustainable food system.

This one-day event will shine a spotlight on and amplify the most important ideas, initiatives, and voices for the necessary food systems revolution. The power of this day and the hundreds gathered together will awaken some, re-energize others, help advance a shared vision for the future of food we desire, fortify the movement, and make clear specific ways each person can help transform the system.

Event Details
The event will bring together influential and innovative voices from the sustainable food movement for this day of inspiration and call to action. The goal is to connect people across disciplines around the urgent issue of our broken food system and inspire people to take their place in the necessary revolution.

You can sit back and listen to the event’s internationally renowned speakers, and participate in conversation using the #UVMsummit hashtag. (Post your comments and questions – and they will be answered on the event’s blog after the conference).

What: Speakers will take the stage, give their 10-15 minute talk and then sit back down. The next speaker will immediately follow. There is not space for questions or comments or breakout sessions. There will be two breaks during the talks and a reception at the end, which are times to connect with fellow attendees and the speakers.

Speakers: Read the list of confirmed speakers here.

 You can follow the UVM Sustainable Food Systems blog here. Or find them on Facebook and Twitter.

Find instructions for watching the conference online here.

Green Your Home with our Building Books: 35% Off

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

Hammer? Check. Nails? Check. Straw bale? Cob? Natural paints? Passive solar? Deep Energy Retrofit? Increasingly, homeowners are integrating homes into the natural landscape, building with natural materials or boosting the energy efficiency of an older house as a way to tread lightly on the environment and live more comfortably.

Books for Green Builders: On Sale for 35% Off Until July 3rd

Before you put hammer to nail, we’ve put a selection of our keystone books on sale to inspire you to think about natural building methods for your next green building project.

Happy reading (and building) from the folks at Chelsea Green Publishing!

The Greened House Effect: Renovating Your Home with a Deep Energy Retrofit

 

The Greened House Effect Cover
Retail: $29.95
Discount: $19.47

The Greened House Effect is inspiring, empowering, informative, and entertaining. Jeff Wilson puts a human face on a technical undertaking by relating his family’s Deep Energy Retrofit (DER) story as an adventure drama—with defining moments, ‘learning experiences,’ and palpable joys—interspersed with solid advice about how to carry out one’s own DER. At the same time, Wilson views a single DER in the context of a growing movement that can positively impact our economy, environmental pollution, and national security. The Greened House Effect means a better life, for one family and for the world.”—Carol Venolia, architect, Come Home to Nature, and co-author, Natural Remodeling for the Not-So-Green Housed

Read Ch 1: Why A Deep Energy Retrofit? HERE…. 

The Natural Building Companion: A Comprehensive Guide to Integrative Design and Construction

 

The Natural Building Companion Cover
Includes instructional DVD!
Retail: $59.95
Discount: $38.97

 

The Natural Building Companion is a joy to read. The approach is holistic, the style is generous, and the authors gracefully balance technical details, beautiful spaces, and big ecological questions. This book empowers the reader to make choices that matter—for their own home and for the health of our planet.”—Paul Lacinski, coauthor of Serious Straw Bale 

Learn how to make paint from milk curds —  watch the video HERE…

 

Passive Solar Architecture: Heating, Cooling, Ventilation, Daylighting, and More Using Natural Flows

 

 

Passive Solar Architecture Cover
Retail: $85.00
Discount: $55.25

“If you read just one book on sustainable building, choose Passive Solar Architecture. In this single-volume handbook, authors David A. Bainbridge and Ken Haggard use warmth and wit to give readers a thorough understanding of passive heating and cooling. In an overheated world, where buildings gobble up the biggest share of energy, this book should be required reading for contractors, architects, homeowners and anyone who cares about housing.” —Nicolette Toussaint, architectural designer

 

 

Natural Building Classics and Bestsellers

 

 

The Hand-Sculpted House Cover

Retail: $35.00
Sale: $22.75

Read More The Hand-Sculpted House

Build Your Own Earth Oven Cover

Retail: $17.95
Sale: $11.67

Read More Build Your Own Earth Oven

The Straw Bale House Cover

Retail: $34.95
Sale: $22.72

Read More The Straw Bale House

Natural Building Books: 35% Off Until July 3rd

 

 

A Handmade Life Cover

 Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25

Read More A Handmade Life

The Earth-Sheltered House Cover

Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47

Read More The Passive Solar House

The Woodland House Cover

Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
The Natural House Lot

The Solar House Cover

Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47

Read More The Solar House

The Passive Solar House Cover

Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00

Read More The Passive Solar House

The Natural House Cover

Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00

The Natural House Lot

 

 

Masonry Heaters Cover

Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97

Read More Masonry Heaters

The Book of Masonry Stoves Cover 

Retail: $35.00
Sale: $22.75

Read More What Then Must We Do?

Roundwood Timber Framing Cover

Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97

Read More Roundwood Timber Framing

 

 

Serious Straw Bale Cover

Retail: $34.95
Sale: $
22.72

Read More Serious Straw Bale

Cob Builders Handbook Cover

Retail: $23.95
Sale: $15.57

Read More Cob Builders Handbook

The Complete Yurt Handbook Cover

Retail: $21.95
Sale: $
14.27

Read The Complete Yurt Handbook

Stone House Cover

Retail: $34.95
Sale: $22.72

Read More Stone House

The Slate Roof Bible Cover

Retail: $34.95
Sale: $22.72

Read More The Slate Roof Bible

Adobe Homes for All Climates Cover

Retail: $34.95
Sale: $22.72

Read More Adobe Homes for All Climates

Independent Builder Cover

Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00

Read More Independent Builder

Living Homes Cover

Retail: $30.00
Sale: $19.50

Read More Living Homes

Energy Free Cover

Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25

Read More Farms with a Future

 

Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example.
Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied.

 

Raids, Crackdowns, and Armed Seizures: What Consumers Confront to Access Real Food

Monday, June 17th, 2013

Here’s the scenario: You decide to start selling the goods from your farm so that your community can enjoy fresh, unprocessed food from a local source. Somehow, the government finds out. How do they respond? Do they…

A)  Applaud you for your entrepreneurial spirit?
B)  Ask you to help them spread the word about other cow shares and co-ops in the area?
C)  Tell you that you could face jail time for privately selling food to local consumers?
D)  Take you away in handcuffs?

If you guessed A or B, wrong! If you’re Rawesome Foods, your answer is D. If you’re Alvin Shlangen or Amish dairy farmer Vernon Hershberger, then the government handed you C (in the form of a lawsuit).

Think you control the right to choose what you eat? Think again. “In the name of food safety…the U.S. government has declared war on people who would dare to exercise their most fundamental human right to choose their food,” writes Joel Salatin in the Foreword to Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Food Rights by journalist David E. Gumpert.

Salatin continues, “The fact that neither the Declaration of Independence nor the U.S. Constitution ever mentions the word food indicates that it was such a ubiquitous and common part of human experience that the framers of our country couldn’t imagine its restriction. Like air for breathing or sunshine for growing plants.”

This unprecedented government regulation and control has spurred activists and eaters across the country to cry out against such crackdowns and demand the right to choose what they put in their bodies.

Why are hard-working normally law-abiding farmers aligning with urban and suburban consumers to flaunt well-established food safety regulations and statutes? Why are parents, who want only the best for their children, seeking out food that regulators say could be dangerous? And, why are regulators and prosecutors feeling so threatened by this trend?

This erosion in the confidence of the food system carries serious implications. It financially threatens large corporations if long-established food brands come under prolonged and severe public questioning. It threatens economic performance if foods deemed “safe” become scarcer, and thus more expensive. And it is potentially explosive politically if too many people lose confidence in the professionalism of the food regulators who are supposed to be protecting us from tainted food, and encourages folks to exit the public food system for private solutions like the consumers in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Maine, and elsewhere. Just look at the vituperative corporate response to recent consumer-led campaigns to label foods with genetically-modified ingredients.

As more consumers become intent on making the final decisions on what foods they are going to feed themselves and their families, and regulators become just as intent on asserting what they see as their authority over inspecting and licensing all food, ugly scenarios of agitated citizens battling government authorities over access to food staples seem likely to proliferate. It’s a recipe for a new kind of rights movement centered on the most basic acts—what we choose to eat.

“With incredible clarity and masterful storytelling, David Gumpert leads us on a journey into the trenches of America’s battle over food rights,” writes Ben Hewitt, author of The Town That Food Saved: How One Community Found Vitality in Local Food. “No one knows this terrain and understands the implications as thoroughly as Gumpert, and the result is a book that will by turns enrage and inspire you. The battle for the right to nourish our bodies with real food must be won, and this book is an essential part of making that happen.”

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Food Rights: The Escalating Battle Over Who Decides What We Eat is available now and on sale for 35% off.

Read the Introduction below.

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Food Rights: Introduction by Chelsea Green Publishing

Compost This Book! A Q&A with Gary Paul Nabhan on Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land

Wednesday, June 12th, 2013

In his new book, Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land, author Gary Paul Nabhan draws on the knowledge and expertise of traditional and visionary desert farmers, compiling stories of resilience and adaptation that urge readers to plan for uncertainty, acquire knowledge, and take action.

The following exchange between Nabhan and Chelsea Green Senior Editor Ben Watson—who worked with Nabhan on Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land —covers a variety of topics, including how this book is for farmers and gardeners of all sizes and regions, and why there’s hope in a time when it would seem all too easy to succumb to despair.

Ben Watson: What does global climate change have to do with America’s failure to produce more food than its people consume for the third straight year?

Gary Nabhan: For starters, we had more than 2,200 counties declared national drought disaster areas in 2012, four times more than in 2011. Farmers applied for $13 billion dollars of federal insurance due to crop failures and reduced yields, more than twice the running average per year. Increasingly unprecedented climatic disruption is affecting farmers, ranchers, foragers and fishers more than ever before, and yet big agriculture’s lobbyists like the American Farm Bureau Federation deny that we’re entering a “new normal.” Sadly, that disadvantages its own rank and file members by not developing programs that prevent crop failure, as if crop insurance for more failed farms will be sufficient.

BW: Can farmers and food producers really do anything significant to combat or even lessen the effects of climate change?

GN: Absolutely. More than any other human activity that both contributes to and is negatively impacted by climate change, farming has tremendous capacity to both reduce its carbon footprint and adapt to changing conditions. Farmers can do so by using a wider range of crop and livestock diversity to buffer themselves from uncertainty, and by adapting and ramping up strategies for reducing the impacts of heat and drought that traditional desert food producers have employed for centuries, if not millennia.

BW: In writing this book, you’ve drawn upon the traditional knowledge of native and immigrant farmers from around the world — people who have learned how to deal with climate uncertainty. How did you find them?

GN: Since 1978 or so, I have been fortunate enough to occasionally travel on work to nearly every other desert in the world, where I tried to pay keen attention to what indigenous and immigrant farmers were doing to deal with drought, heat, salinization and scarcity of fresh water for irrigation.  When I saw what looked to be an oasis-like mirage in the desert, I sought it out and found remarkably resilient, intelligent farmers there.  Thirty-five years later, I’m humbled by how much they have tried to teach me that perhaps all of us now need to know.

BW: Is this book primarily for farmers or gardeners? In other words, at what scale are these strategies applicable?

GN: I’d hate to see these strategies relegated only to a backyard garden in some desert region.  I’d like to see farmers and gardeners everywhere—not just in historically arid regions—take stock of these remarkably diverse adaptations to climate uncertainty. They may need to scale them up and adapt them to their own peculiar conditions, but as far as I can see, there will be no silver bullet like a climate-friendly GMO that is going to save us. We need to diversify our strategies and scales for agricultural production if we are to regain some modicum of food security.

BW:  In your opinion, what is driving climate change more: on-farm carbon “foodprints” or the carbon foodprint of our global supply and distribution system?

GN: The latter—on-farming fossil fuel accounts for less than one-fifth of all energy expenditure in our entire food system, but it’s an expenditure of energy that we can dramatically reduce through creative solutions that will improve rather than harm farmer’s bottom line. And consumers at large should help farmers transition to more energy- and water-efficient practices, as well as dealing with similar problems in the ways they store, process and consume food at home.

BW: Do you have cause for either hope or despair as we pass beyond the carbon level of 400 parts per million in Earth’s atmosphere?

GN: As the saying goes, I’m an intellectual pessimist but a glandular optimist. Every time I get my hands dirty outside and try to solve the problems in my own orchard and garden, I find hope lurking in the emerging greenery. If we simply sit on our butts all day in an office and wring our hands, not much will get done. So read my book quickly, then compost it, and with what you’ve learned, plant something fresh in it!

Gary Paul Nabhan will be speaking at Shelburne Farms Thursday, June 27. Register here.

The Green Home Renovation Revolution: Save Money, Save the Environment

Monday, June 10th, 2013

High energy bills got you down? Worried about the future of planet Earth? Fear not! Green building expert Jeff Wilson is here to help you save money and the environment this Father’s Day, and beyond.

“Weatherization on steroids” is how Wilson describes the deep energy retrofits (DERs) outlined in his book, The Greened House Effect. Drawing on 25 years of construction experience and the DER of his family’s own 1942 home, Wilson goes beyond the low-hanging fruit such as recycling and changing light bulbs, and instead presents a green renovation plan for homeowners that is both extensive and practical.

“Pay for your deep energy retrofit improvements with the money you’ll save on energy bills and get paid to generate your own energy right at home,” writes Wilson in the book’s introduction. “This grassroots, people-powered solution captures the energy we ‘drop on the ground’ every day to ensure and improve our comfort, health, prosperity, environment, and security in the new energy economy.”

In a readable and engaging narrative, The Greened House Effect offers information on energy-saving techniques, including:

• Superinsulation;
• Air sealing;
• Energy miser appliances;
• Financing your DER;
• Renewable energy generation; and more.

Soon enough, those high energy bills you once worried about will be a thing of the past. And you can feel good about doing something nice for your home, your wallet, and the planet.

“Jeff Wilson has provided an extraordinary service to all of us who are struggling to make our homes more energy-efficient,” writes Sarah Susanka, architect and author of The Not So Big House series. “I know of no other book that takes the reader on such a thoroughly entertaining but equally fact-filled tour of all the options and challenges in making an older home equal to, or better than, new. For anyone who is serious about making their existing home a better custodian of our planet’s resources, The Greened House Effect is a must read.”

The Greened House Effect: Renovating Your Home with a Deep Energy Retrofit is available now and on sale for 35% off.

Read Chapter 1: Why A Deep Energy Retrofit? below.

Chapter 1: Why A Deep Energy Retrofit?

Save 35% on Our Recent Spring Releases

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

Resilience, Regeneration, and Rights — these are the three “Rs” covered by several recent releases.

Whether you want to read an in-depth guide to personal preparedness and homestead resiliency; how to grow food in hotter, drier climates; save money (and the environment) with a green home makeover; or learn more about the emerging battle over food sovereignty in the U.S., we have the right book for you.

Since 1984, Chelsea Green has published books at the vanguard of sustainable living and our latest offerings keep that tradition alive and thriving. Aside from the three most recent releases featured below, check out additional sale titles from our Spring list to inspire you in your backyard or your community.

Happy reading from the folks at Chelsea Green Publishing!

P.S. In case you missed it, The New York Times profiled The New Horse-Powered Farm and its author Stephen Leslie in a feature about draft power as a re-emerging trend in farming. You can see Leslie at work in the fields with his Fjord’s in this special Times slideshow

The Resilient Farm and Homestead: An Innovative Permaculture and Whole Systems Design Approach

The Resilient Farm and Homestead Cover
Retail: $40.00
Discount: $26.00

The Resilient Farm and Homestead will be essential reading for the serious prepper as well as for everyone interested in creating a more resilient lifestyle or landscape.”—Carol Deppe, author of The Resilient Gardener

“This intelligent, challenging book, rooted somewhere between back-to-the-land idealism and radical survivalism, sees resilience as both planting and building for the use of future generations …. ”—Publisher’s Weekly, Starred Review

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Food Rights: The Escalating Battle Over Who Decides What We Eat

ife, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Food Rights Cover
Retail: $19.95
Discount: $
12.97

Foreword by Joel Salatin

“With incredible clarity and masterful storytelling, David Gumpert leads us on a journey into the trenches of America’s battle over food rights … the result is a book that will by turns enrage and inspire you. The battle for the right to nourish our bodies with real food must be won, and this book is an essential part of making that happen.” —Ben Hewitt, author of The Town That Food Saved

 

Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land: Lessons from Desert Farmers on Adapting to Climate Uncertainty

Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land Cover
Retail: $29.95
Discount: $19.47

Foreword by Bill McKibben

“Gary Nabhan’s latest book is indispensable. Everyone who grows food—make that, everyone who eats food—should be grateful he wrote it. An homage to old wisdom and to the latter-day soil magicians who are Nabhan’s living muses, it is a rich herbarium of delicious, hardy sustenance and a manual for our future.”—Alan Weisman, author, The World Without Us 

New Books: 35% Off Until June 19th

The Greened House Effect Cover

Retail: $29.95

Sale: $19.47

Read More The Greened House Effect

Cows Save the Planet Cover

Retail: $17.95

Sale: $11.67

Read More ows Save the Planet

Paradise Lot Cover

Retail: $19.95

Sale: $12.97

Read More Paradise Lot

Good Morning, Beautiful Business Cover

Retail: $17.95

Sale: $11.67

Read More Good Morning, Beautiful Business

What Then Must We Do? Cover

Retail: $17.95

Sale: $11.67

Read More What Then Must We Do?

Rebuilding the Foodshed Cover

Retail: $19.95

Sale: $12.97

Read More Rebuilding the Foodshed

The New Horse-Powered Farm Cover

Retail: $39.95

Sale: $25.97

Read More The New Horse-Powered Farm

Natural Beekeeping Cover

Retail: $34.95

Sale: $22.72

Read More Natural Beekeeping

Natural Beekeeping (DVD) Cover

Retail: $24.95

Sale: $16.22

Read More Natural Beekeeping DVD

Top Bar Beekeeping DVD Cover

Retail: $14.95

Sale: $9.72

Read More From Asparagus to Zucchini

Perennial Vegetable Gardening DVD Cover

Retail: $29.95

Sale: $19.47

Read More perennial Vegetable Gardening DVD

Holistic Orcharding DVD Cover

Retail: $49.95

Sale: $32.47

Read More Holistic Orcharding DVD

The Grafter's Handbook Cover

Retail: $40.00

Sale: $26.00

Read More The Grafter's Handbook

The Organic Seed Grower Cover

Retail: $49.95

Sale: $32.47

Read More The Organic Seed Grower

Farms with a Future Cover

Retail: $29.95

Sale: $19.47

Read More Farms with a Future

Desert or Paradise Cover

Retail: $29.95

Sale: $19.47

Read More Desert or Paradise

Slow Wine Cover

Retail: $25.00

Sale: $16.25

Read More Slow Wine 2013

Cheese and Culture Cover

Retail: $17.95

Sale: $11.67

Read More Cheese and Culture


Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on  sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied.

Calling all Preppers, Permies, and Perennial Homesteaders

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

Want to grow rice in your backyard? How about warming up in your very own compost-heated hot tub?

Imagine if where you lived was not simply a passive landscape, but a living, growing habitat. That’s the reality for Ben Falk and his team at Whole Systems Research Farm in Vermont’s Mad River Valley.

Falk is a land designer and site developer at Whole Systems Design, LLC where, by imitating natural systems and utilizing regenerative techniques, his land can adapt to the challenges presented by climate change.

Inspired by a decade of experience, Falk has written a handbook invaluable for anyone who wishes to create working systems that allow them to live in harmony with their land and the natural environment, while preparing for the inevitable climate uncertainty of the future.

Permaculture Activist’s Peter Bane writes, “This book is tightly argued and rich with information…The discussion of living well on the edge of a shaky economy ranges across a vast terrain from the weight of firewood to detailing of buildings that last to making medicine from plants and fungi in the garden.”

The Resilient Farm and Homestead: An Innovative Permaculture and Whole Systems Design Approach offers working, tested results and practical information on a variety of topics, including:

• Landshaping;
• Water security;
• Perennial crops;
• Soil fertility;
• Nutrient-dense foods, and more.

“The Resilient Farm and Homestead weaves together permaculture theory as modified by actual practice on a ten-acre Vermont farm with a thorough preparedness guide for times of climate change and greater uncertainties of all kinds and sizes,” writes Carol Deppe, author of The Resilient Gardener: Food Production and Self-Reliance in Uncertain Times. “This book will be essential reading for the serious prepper as well as for everyone interested in creating a more resilient lifestyle or landscape.”

The Resilient Farm and Homestead is available now, and on sale for 35% off. Read Chapter 1 below.

Chapter 1: Creating a Positive Legacy while Adapting to Rapid Change


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