Archive for November, 2012


Videos from The Natural Building Companion

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

The Natural Building Companion is a compendium of methods for earth-based construction ranging from straw bale to cob and applicable to a wide range of climates.

To put this encyclopedic book together, we partnered with Yestermorrow Design/Build School, fellow Vermonters from the Mad River valley. Authors Jacob Deva Racusin and Ace McArleton are frequent instructors at Yestermorrow, and also run New Frameworks Natural Building.

The book alone is packed with information on how to use traditional tools and low-technology materials to build energy-efficient and beautiful homes, but as an added bonus it also includes an instructional DVD that is cross-referenced with the text to help you learn from Racusin and McArleton’s examples as well.

Below you will find a handful of clips from the DVD to give you a sense of what it contains, and examples of the authors’ passion and skill at teaching these low-energy building techniques.

How to Evaluate Airtightness in a Natural Building Using a Blower Door Test – From Chapter 7

Timber Framing Techniques – From Chapter 13

 

How to Work with Straw Bales: Resizing, Reshaping, and Securing Bales – From Chapter 14

 

How to do a ‘Ribbon Test’ to Evaluate Site Soil for Natural Building – From Chapter 17

 

How to Make Paint from Milk Curds – From Chapter 20 

Power from the People – A Webinar with Greg Pahl

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

Renewable power is always better than fossil fuel power, but even solar and wind can stir up environmental concerns. Here in Vermont, where ridgeline construction is limited and restricted, residents are increasingly seeing their beloved landscapes interrupted by wind turbines. Meanwhile, activists in the southwest are seeing huge solar installations disrupt the delicate desert ecology.

But these sorts of massive-scale projects are not the only way to do renewables. Small-scale projects that are funded, planned, and supported by local communities are much more sustainable, and, in the wake of Superstorm Sandy may be more resilient to get back online in the event of knockout storms.

This Friday, November 16th, join Greg Pahl, author of Power From the People, for a webinar on the subject. The talk starts at 10 AM PT, 1 PM ET, 18 GMT.

Communities across the United States are taking power into their own hands by organizing, financing, and launching their own local renewable energy projects! In this webinar, energy expert Greg Pahl will describe the best practices and lessons learned from the community-owned wind, solar, and biofuel projects featured in his latest book, Power From the People (Chelsea Green, 2012). Pahl’s book is part of our Community Resilience Guide series we’re co-publishing with the folks at Post Carbon Institute.

In fact, check out the recent Grist article written by PCI’s Asher Miller about just how we can take the lead from Bill McKibben and divest from Big Oil by investing in our own backyards. Miller cites some of the many examples in Pahl’s books where communities are already doing this – to much success.

This event will comprise a 30 minute presentation followed by a live Q&A. Join by going here at the time of the presentation where you will be able to login and participate.

Playing Nuclear Roulette in Vermont

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

Vermont’s lone nuclear reactor — Entergy-owned Vermont Yankee — has been named one of the five worst reactors in the United States, according to the new book Nuclear Roulette: The Truth about the Most Dangerous Energy Source on Earth, published by Chelsea Green Publishing.

For much of the past Vermont Yankee has been the focus of ongoing state and federal regulatory investigations, legislative battles, and ongoing courtroom drama. It started running in 1972, and was recently given a 20-year operating extension by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

This coming weekend, and into next week, activists will renew their attention to the aging reactor in hopes they can finish the work of the Vermont Senate a few years ago — close down Vermont Yankee permanently.

In this new work — which we’re offering on sale this week — investigative journalist Gar Smith lists five nuclear facilities as the “worst reactors” in the United States. They were chosen because they are representative of the poor regulatory oversight that has endangered the public, and poisoned the environment. Many other nuclear power sites around the country have equally disturbing records of poor performance, emergency shutdowns, and close calls, which Smith details in ample supply in Nuclear Roulette.

“The consequences of poor regulatory oversight can be seen in the operating histories of the country’s nuclear reactors,” writes Smith in  Nuclear Roulette.

The other four reactors are: Entergy-owned Indian Point in New York; Davis-Besse in Ohio, and Diablo Canyon and San Onofre in California.

Here is the section devoted to Vermont Yankee, which also exemplifies what happens when the industry and its lapdog regulators team up against the wishes of a state’s citizens and elected officials:

Vermont Yankee: The Green Mountain State vs. the NRC

On March 10, 2011, the NRC unanimously approved a 20-year license extension for the troubled Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. Within hours of the decision, three similar General Electric Mark 1 reactors were knocked off-line by an earthquake in Japan—and all three overheated and exploded. Despite the devastation in Fukushima Prefecture, the NRC stood by its decision to allow the 40-year-old Vermont Yankee plant to continue operating through 2031. Given Vermont Yankee’s history of breakdowns and cover-ups—and the fact that a reactor accident here could put more than a million Americans at risk—the watchdog group Beyond Nuclear excoriated the NRC’s decision as both “audacious” and “reckless.”

Vermonters received another jolt when it was revealed that the NRC had voted to extend Vermont Yankee’s license even though its inspectors had discovered that critical electric cables powering the plant’s safety systems had been “submerged under water for extended periods of time.”

It was not the only maintenance failure of Entergy Corp., which had acquired the plant in 2002. The company has a reputation for “buying reactors cheap and running them into the ground.” In 2004, a poorly maintained electrical system set off a large fire in the plant’s turbine building that forced an emergency shutdown. In 2007, Vermont Yankee experienced a series of maintenance problems that included the dramatic collapse of a cooling tower. A waterfall of high-pressure water burst from a ruptured cooling pipe and tore a gaping hole in the plant’s wall. Entergy was able to hide the damage—but only until a concerned employee leaked a photo of the wreckage to the press. The huge gap in the side of the building was reminiscent of the hole in the side of the Pentagon following the 9/11 attacks.

Tritium + Entergy = Perjury

During state hearings in 2009, Entergy executives were asked if radioactive tritium detected in the soil and groundwater near the reactor could have leaked from the plant. Company officials repeatedly swore under oath that this was impossible since there were no underground pipes at the plant. It was not until January 2010, after a leak of radioactive tritium was traced to a series of subsurface pipes, that Entergy changed its story. While the plant didn’t have “underground pipes,” Entergy now explained, it did have “buried pipes.”

Attorney general William Sorrell began a 17-month investigation during which Entergy’s former executive vice president Curtis Hebert admitted that the company’s statements about the pipes “could have been more accurate.” The state ordered Entergy to remove more than 300,000 gallons of radioactive water fron the soil and ground water at the reactor site, and Vermont governor Peter Shumlin demanded the plant’s closure.

There’s another waste problem at the plant: a large and potentially lethal stockpile of used fuel rods. While Fukushima’s six reactors had between 360 and 500 tons of slowly dying fuel rods on-site, the nuclear graveyard at Vermont Yankee is filled with 690 tons of dangerously radioactive waste. And the storage pools for this spent fuel lack both backup cooling systems and backup generators.

Beyond Nuclear’s “Freeze Our Fukushimas” campaign, which aims to close all 23 Mark 1 reactors in the United States, hoped to score its first victory when Vermont Yankee’s 40-year operating license expired on March 21, 2012. The odds were improved by the fact that Vermont is the only state that gives lawmakers the authority to veto a nuclear power plant. In February 2010, a month after Entergy’s tritium scandal was exposed, the Vermont Senate voted 26–4 against issuing a new “certificate of public good” that would allow Vermont Yankee to continue operating.

Entergy Sues Vermont

In April 2011, Entergy’s lawyers responded by suing the governor and the state, claiming, “We have a right to continue operation.” On January 19, 2012, federal judge Garvan Murtha ruled that only the NRC could close a nuclear plant, and therefore Entergy was entitled to its new 20-year operating license. Murtha also made it clear that the Green Mountain State was not entitled to raise any questions regarding plant safety or the prices charged for nuclear power—under federal law, only the NRC could raise such matters.

The decision alarmed Beyond Nuclear and other critics who feared the nuclear industry and the federal government were working in concert “to pre-empt a state’s right to self determination for an energy future in the public good.” Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) quickly weighed in. “If Vermont wants to move to energy efficiency and sustainable energy,” Sanders told the Burlington Free Press, “no corporation should have the right to force our state to stay tethered to an aging, problem-ridden nuclear plant.”

Eight days after the judge’s decision, Entergy refused the state’s second request to investigate the source of a tritium leak that had poisoned a drinking well on the plant’s property. On July 25, 2011, Entergy further demonstrated its disregard for due process by announcing a $60 million refueling project—an investment that would pay off only if the power plant won its extension.

Entergy’s lawyers publicly confirmed their understanding that the company still needs the permission of Vermont’s Public Service Board (a quasi-official board that oversees Vermont’s utilities) if it is to continue operating its reactors. In a responding press release, however, the state’s Department of Public Service (which represents the interests of utility customers in cases brought before the Public Service Board) cautioned, “Past experience shows Entergy cannot be taken at its word.”

In a daunting struggle that pits 600,000 Vermonters against the US government, the nuclear industry, and the NRC, the state attorney general vowed to appeal Judge Murtha’s decision—all the way to the US Supreme Court, if necessary.

“People don’t trust the NRC,” Bob Audette, a reporter for the Brattleboro Reformer told a film crew from the Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR). “They think it’s the lapdog of the industry. They think it’s there basically to affirm everything the industry does. It’s too cozy with the industry.”

In another interview with the CIR, Anthony Roisman, a legal consultant for New York and Vermont, expressed his concerns with the NRC: “This regulatory agency does not regulate effectively. And until it does, there is no way that the public can have any confidence that plants, whether they are licensed or re-licensed, won’t have some catastrophic event. No one will benefit from a post-catastrophic-event hand-wringing that says, ‘Oh we should have done this and we’ll do better next time.’ The consequences are unimaginable.”

Piquant, Pungent, Puckery…Perfect! Celebrate National Pickle Day

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

November 14th is National Pickle Day, and to help you celebrate we’ve put a selection of books on sale full of pickling and preserving recipes that range from simple, dill-scented cucumber pickles to funky, lacto-fermented salsa, and much more.

Pickling is an ancient method of preserving fresh food — especially vegetables. Salts draw out moisture and encourage bacteria that turn things tangy instead of terrible.

Your growing season is probably over by now (except for you lucky warm-climate readers whom we here in Vermont have already started to envy, and will not stop until mud season dries up next May!) but if you put up some pickles this summer they’re probably perfect by now.

So pop open a mason jar of dilly beans or a can of corn relish and peruse our pick of pickling books! All of the books below will be on sale until November 20.

Reg. Price: $39.95

Sale Price: $25.97

The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from Around the World

Sandor Ellix Katz has been called many things, fermentation guru, “Sandorkraut”, cultural revivalist — and Prince of Pickles.

The Art of Fermentation, Sandor Katz’s encyclopedic and inspiring guide to all things tangy and alive, will teach you everything you need to know about pickles and other ferments.

If you live in Portland, Oregon, head down to Powell’s tomorrow to meet the prince in person! More information on this National Pickle Day event, here.

.

Preserving Food
Reg. Price: $25.00

Sale Price: $18.75

Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, and Lactic Fermentation

Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning offers more than 250 easy and enjoyable recipes featuring locally grown and minimally refined ingredients. It is an essential guide for those who seek healthy food for a healthy world.

Typical books about preserving garden produce nearly always assume that modern kitchen gardeners will boil or freeze their vegetables and fruits. Yet here is a book that goes back to the future—celebrating traditional but little-known French techniques for storing and preserving edibles in ways that maximize flavor and nutrition.

.

WF cover image
Reg. Price: $34.95

Sale Price: $22.72

Wild Flavors: One Chef’s Transformative Year Cooking from Eva’s Farm

Is the produce aisle seeming a little too tame lately? Mass-produced tomatoes with no flavor, kale greens tough from spending days in a truck, the same old broccoli again and again.

Wild Flavors delivers exactly what its title promises. Chef Didi Emmons spent a year visiting Eva Sommaripa’s farm, which provides fresh greens, herbs — and vegetables commonly known as weeds — to Boston restaurants. Calaminth, purslane, arugula flowers? Pure, yummy magic.

.

Glorious Glut cover image
Reg. Price: $24.95

Sale Price: $18.71

Making the Most of Your Glorious Glut: Cooking, Storing, Freezing, Drying & Preserving Your Garden Produce

Making the most of your Glorious Glut is the answer to the perennial problem of an over-abundance of wonderful fruit and vegetables.

From cucumbers to spinach, tomatoes to runner beans or blackcurrants to plums, most gardeners will recognize the sinking feeling that creeps over you when you realize you have had such a good harvest that you cannot actually face picking, cooking or eating any more. Even if you haven’t grown them yourself, it is easy to end up with too many fruits or vegetables after just one visit to the local pick-your-own center or a trip to a country hedgerow.

.

(Photo Credit: Steve Adams, via Julia Usher)

Coming Soon: Nuclear Roulette

Monday, November 12th, 2012

Energy is one of the biggest problems facing the industrialized human race. In recent years the world has seen a growth in the use of renewable power sources such as wind and solar, but it’s not enough to outpace the rising demand for electricity.

This conundrum has encouraged many to look to nuclear energy. Its proponents say it’s safe, clean, and creates no greenhouse gases — but Nuclear Roulette, a new book by the editor emeritus of Earth Island Journal, Gar Smith, says these claims are nonsense. The subtitle says it all, “The Truth about the Most Dangerous Energy Source on Earth.”

Nuclear Roulette is available for 25% off this week.

Booklist calls Nuclear Roulette a “thorough, insightful dissection of nuclear power’s weaknesses,” and Kirkus Reviews praises Smith for “lay[ing] out an impressively researched narrative, drawing on facts from a wide range of sources, and mak[ing] a strong case that will be hard for even nuclear-power advocates to dismiss out of hand.”

Nuclear Roulette is a great introduction to the failures of atomic energy, but don’t take our word for it! Listen to author Gar Smith make the argument himself, in a conversation with David Swanson here, and one with natural health advocate Gary Null here.

Last Chance: Enter to Win a Chelsea Green Starter Library

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

You’re a beekeeping, seedling starting, chick brooding, sauerkraut-making master, but there’s always another skill you could add to your homesteading repertoire.

Maybe you’ve always wanted to build a straw bale guest house, or a wattle-and-daub woodshed. Or you’ve been thinking about what it would take to grow your own grains as well as your own greens.

Well, homesteader, this is your lucky day! There’s still time to sign up for our latest giveaway to win a selection of books to teach you just what you need to know. We’ve teamed up with the folks at Mother Earth News to offer the following books to one fortunate winner this month.

Chelsea Green publishes standby favorites like Eliot Coleman to more recent “instant classics” like Sandor and Harvey’s books.

The contest ends in mid-November so don’t delay.

Sign up here for your chance to win.

Here are the books:

Up Tunket Road: The Education of a Modern Homesteader

By Philip Ackerman-Leist

The inspiring true story of a young couple who embraced the joys of simple living while also acknowledging its frustrations and complexities.

The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from Around the World

By Sandor Ellix Katz

Quite simply the most comprehensive guide to do-it-yourself home fermentation ever published.

The Resilient Gardener: Food Production and Self-Reliance in Uncertain Times

By Carol Deppe

Filled with detailed information about growing and using five key crops: potatoes, corn, beans, squash, and eggs.

When Technology Fails: A Manual for Self-Reliance, Sustainability, and Surviving the Long Emergency

By Mat Stein

A comprehensive primer on sustainable living skills—food, water, shelter, energy, first-aid, and more.

The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year-Round Vegetable Production Using Deep-Organic Techniques and Unheated Greenhouses

By Eliot Coleman

Grow produce of unparalleled freshness and quality in customized un- or minimally-heated greenhouses.

Small-Scale Grain Raising: An Organic Guide to Growing, Processing, and Using Nutritious Whole Grains for Home Gardeners and Local Farmers

By Gene Logsdon

Logsdon covers the basics of grain production—planting, dealing with pests, harvesting, processing, storing, and using whole grains.

Gaia’s Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture

By Toby Hemenway

Learn how to apply basic permaculture principles to make your garden more diverse, more natural, more productive, and more beautiful.

The Carbon-Free Home: 36 Remodeling Projects to Help Kick the Fossil-Fuel Habit

By Stephen and Rebekah Hren

Transform your home with projects both small and large, listed by skill, time, cost, and energy saved.

The Small-Scale Poultry Flock: An All-Natural Approach to Raising Chickens and Other Fowl for Home and Market Growers

By Harvey Ussery

The most comprehensive and definitive guide to date on raising all-natural poultry.

Top Bar Beekeeping: Organic Practices for Honeybee Health

By Les Crowder and Heather Harrell

Provides complete information on hive management and other aspects of using innovative and natural top-bar beehives.

Don’t forget to share the giveaway with your gardening, farming, and fermenting friends. Good luck, and happy homesteading!

‘Prince of Pickles’ to Preside Over Powell’s Pickle Day Party

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

Paula Crossfield, editor of Civil Eats, crowned Sandor Katz “Prince of Pickles” when she interviewed him earlier this year. He’s also been dubbed the “fermentation guru,” but that’s far less alliterative than what Katz often calls himself in interviews: A “fermentation fetishist.”

Katz’s passion for all things fermented makes his latest book, The Art of Fermentation, as zesty and exciting as a freshly opened crock of kim chi, not to mention a New York Times bestseller.

Do you have questions about sauerkraut, which Katz has dubbed his “gateway drug,” or are you curious to learn from Katz about new ferments you’ve never tried — like kefir, kvass and kombucha. Katz’s new book is the most comprehensive guide available, and will introduce you to fermented foods from cultures around the world. If your garden produced a patch of plump peas this summer, you can pickle that! Or you can pickle a peck of perfect peppers, Sandor Katz will show you how.

If you’re in the Portland area (the incredibly pickle-friendly Portland area), you will have the perfect opportunity to praise the Prince of Pickles in person. To celebrate National Pickle Day on November 14th, Powell’s City of Books is hosting Katz for a talk about The Art of Fermentation, and a book signing.

Though, unlike the Portlandia episode Katz will keep his pickling panache strictly to truly edible items — no unused jewel cases, broken heels, or band aids. However, if we do say so ourselves – Katz’s chops are far superior to that of Fred Armisen’s. Maybe worthy enough for a cameo on Portlandia?

Journalist Liz Crain is hosting Katz during his stay in Portland, and she’s also giving away a copy of the book (which you can get signed by Katz himself). Enter to win by leaving a comment on her post about your favorite ferment.

Just in time for the holidays, we have combined Katz’s two classic books on fermentation (The Art of Fermentation and Wild Fermentation) with a DVD of one of his popular workshops. Get all three in one reduced-price set here.

.

.

.

.

.

Ecological Inspirations for your Thanksgiving Menu

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

The holiday season is upon us, and soon your family and friends will gather for feasts to ward off the coming chill of winter.

Food brings us together, especially during the holidays. Too many of us have forgotten how to make things from scratch, or never experience the joy that comes with making a special meal with ecologically-grown or raised, local ingredients. To re-ignite your passion for food, this email contains recipes for corn bread, “roots” beer, blue cheese, as well as inspired locavore twists on classic recipes for turkey, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, and more.

Take a look at the menu we’ve put together with full recipes below:

~ Starters ~
Simmered Mushroom Trio with Garlic Crostini
Rindless Blue Cheese
Roots Beer
~ Main Dish ~
Turkey and Gravy
Walnut Sausage Stuffing
Mashed Potatoes for Twelve
~ Side Dishes ~
Little Lemon Rolls
Cornbread
Cranberry Sauce
Kale Salad with Apples, Feta and Walnuts
Roasted Root Vegetables
~ Dessert ~
Apple Pie

Happy reading from the folks at Chelsea Green Publishing!

P.S. Don’t forget to check out our full list of books on sale here: http://www.chelseagreen.com/bookstore/sale

.

~ Starters ~

Simmered Mushroom Trio with Garlic Crostini

Cooking Close to Home

From Cooking Close
to Home

From Cooking Close to Home: A Year of Seasonal Recipes

Start your Thanksgiving meal with a crispy, savory, vegetarian appetizer.

Wild mushrooms are simmered with garlic and onions in this simple, healthy recipe from Cooking Close to Home. 

“Mushrooms are low in calories, and rich in antioxidants. Local producers are now growing mushrooms throughout the year, so indulge in whatever varieties are available.”

Mushroom Crostini

Authors Diane Imrie and Richard Jarmusz are the chef/nutritionist team who have won awards for revolutionizing the food served at Vermont’s largest hospital. Lucky patients at Fletcher Allen are now served healthy, organic, local, and delicious meals.

The cookbook takes you through the seasons, and is the perfect accompaniment to a CSA membership, or a great gift for the locavore on your list.

Get the recipe here…

Rindless Blue Cheese

Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking

From Mastering
Artisan Cheesemaking

From Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking: The Ultimate Guide for Home-Scale and Market Producers

A cheese plate is an easy, crowd-pleasing appetizer. But what if you made one of the cheeses yourself?

If you started this blue cheese today, it might not quite be ready by Thanksgiving, but it’s a great example of the kind of valuable, in-depth, beyond-beginner-level information you can find in Gianaclis Caldwell’s new book. With Caldwell’s welcoming tone, excellent information, and the book’s beautiful design, Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking will help you make the cheeses you’ve always wanted to.


Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking is the one book that tells you everything you need to know to become an award-winning cheese maker. Caldwell’s practical and straightforward explanations make this entire book (along with its amusing anecdotes) a great pleasure to read. Among the recent bounty of books on cheese, this one is a must-have.” — Max McCalman, author of Mastering Cheese

Want to make your own blue cheese? Get the recipe here…


Roots Beer

The Art of Fermentation
From The Art of Fermentation

From The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from Around the World

Impress your family at the table this Thanksgiving when you share a bottle of homemade root beer, or “roots” beer, as Sandor Katz would put it.

“A traditional root beer is a sweetened and fermented decoction of flavorful plant roots. Contrary to the commonly known singular “root” beer, various roots have been and can be used. As a matter of fact, mixing together more than one type of root yields a better flavor than a single root alone.”

This easy recipe comes from Katz’s new book, The Art of Fermentation, a New York Times bestseller and the most comprehensive guide to fermentation ever published.

Make your own sweet, bubbly root beer. Get the recipe…

.

~ Main Dish ~

Turkey and Gravy: Straightforward, Simple and Delicious

Long Way on a Little
From
Long Way on a Little

From Long Way on a Little: An Earth Lover’s Companion for Enjoying Meat, Pinching Pennies and Living Deliciously

From farmer and author Shannon Hayes, author of Radical Homemakers, comes Long Way on a Little, or as we like to call it, “the only meat cookbook you’ll ever need.”

Hayes raises beef on her farm in upstate New York, and has been spreading the gospel of grassfed meat for years. Grassfed meats require a little extra care in cooking, but reward you with a depth of flavor, and more nutrients than grain-fed meat. In Hayes’s new book, she covers special lost skills such as how to render fat into lard, how to make broth from bones, as well as recipes for cooking pasture-raised beef, pork, poultry, and more.

This simple recipe for Turkey and Gravy will help you make the centerpiece of your Thanksgiving meal delicious.

Get the recipe… 


Walnut Sausage Stuffing

The Farmer and the Grill

From The Farmer
and the Grill

From The Farmer and the Grill: A Guide to Grilling, Barbecuing and Spit-Roasting Grassfed Meat…and for saving the planet one bite at a time

In The Farmer and the Grill, Shannon Hayes shares even more tips on preparing grassfed meats.

Complement Shannon’s turkey recipe from above with her rich Walnut Sausage Stuffing.

“Cook the stuffing separately. I know a lot of folks like to put the stuffing inside their holiday birds, and if Thanksgiving will be positively ruined if you break tradition, then stuff away. However, for a couple reasons, I recommend cooking your stuffing separately. First, everyone’s stuffing recipe is different. Therefore, the density will not be consistent, which means that cooking times will vary dramatically. I am unable to recommend a cooking time, since I cannot control what stuffing each person uses. Also, due to food safety concerns, I happen to think it is safer to cook the stuffing outside the bird.”

Get the recipe for Walnut Sausage Stuffing… 

Mashed Potatoes for Twelve

This Organic Life
From
This Organic Life

From This Organic Life: Confessions of a Suburban Homesteader

Joan Dye Gussow is one of the leaders of the organic food movement. She has taught nutrition for decades, but is perhaps better known for her garden on the fickle Hudson River. Sometimes the Hudson floods her potato patch, but still Joan gardens. In this brief excerpt from her book This Organic Life, Gussow realizes that she long ago crossed a threshold, “we had reached a point where we simply never bought a vegetable.”

She includes her easy recipe for Mashed Potatoes for Twelve (with enough left over for Mashed Potato Cakes) and we thought it was the perfect addition to our Earth-conscious Thanksgiving menu. Bonus points if you grew them yourself!

Get the recipe…

.

.

~ Side Dishes ~

Little Lemon Rolls

Home Baked

From Home Baked

From Home Baked: Nordic Recipes and Techniques for Organic Bread and Pastry

Serve these savory rolls, laced with lemon zest, alongside your turkey and gravy for a burst of flavor.

Home Baked is more than a bread cook book. The authors are reminiscent of the little red hen from the fable: they grow thegrain, harvest the grain, grind the grain and bake the bread, all on their beautiful island farm in Denmark.

The recipes are simple, but in the tradition of Nordic cuisine many incorporate fresh, wild ingredients such as nettles, elder flowers, and wild leeks.

Get the recipe 

Cornbread

The Resilient Gardener

From
The Resilient Gardener
 

From The Resilient Gardener: Food Production and Self-Reliance in Uncertain Times

Carol Deppe teaches gardeners how to do more than just grow lettuce and herbs. Her latest book, The Resilient Gardener, seeks to share her wisdom for growing all the food you need — even if you suffer from food allergies such as gluten intolerance.

With guides to growing, harvesting, preserving, and storing five key crops, The Resilient Gardener is an excellent sourcebook for those trying to feed themselves from their own land.

Corn is one of Deppe’s key crops, and she has carefully bred the perfect varieties for different uses like polenta and cornbread. This recipe, Carol’s Universal Skillet Bread, is versatile enough to be used for sandwiches as well as a tasty, gravy-absorbing side dish — and it uses no wheat or artificial binders.

Get the recipe…

Cranberry Sauce

Full Moon Feast

From Full Moon Feast

From Full Moon Feast: Food and the Hunger for Connection

Balance the unctuousness of your grassfed turkey with the bright acidic tang of cranberries. Either as a sweetened sauce, or a savory relish, these little American natives are a classic garnish for Thanksgiving meats.

Native Americans prized cranberries for their ability to remain edible and unspoiled for months, which made them an excellent food for traveling and a good source of nutrients over long, hard winters when fresh fruit and vegetables were scarce.

Jessica Prentice‘s recipe for cranberry sauce is simple and traditional. It uses maple syrup and honey instead of sugar, which are both sweeteners easy to make on the homestead scale.

Get the recipe…

Kale Salad with Apples, Feta, and Walnuts

Wild Flavors
From Wild Flavors

From Wild Flavors: One Chef’s Transformative Year Cooking from Eva’s Farm

Chef Didi Emmons is known for crafting delightful, fresh, and unique dishes, and her latest cookbook, Wild Flavors offers exactly what the title proclaims.

Kale Salad Video

Wild Flavors chronicles a year Emmons spent learning about new herbs and vegetables from organic farmer Eva Sommaripa. Eva’s passion for the earth, and her delicious produce, inspired Didi to take her cooking to new places.

Serve up Didi’s Sauteed Kale Salad with Apple, Walnuts, and Feta alongside your other dishes for a healthy, bright green dish.

Get the recipe…

Roasted Root Vegetables

Full Moon Feast
From Full Moon Feast

From Full Moon Feast: Food and the Hunger for Connection

In Full Moon Feast, accomplished chef and passionate food activist Jessica Prentice champions locally grown, humanely raised, nutrient-rich foods and traditional cooking methods. The book follows the thirteen lunar cycles of an agrarian year, from the midwinter Hunger Moon and the springtime sweetness of the Sap Moon to the bounty of the Moon When Salmon Return to Earth in autumn.

This recipe from is perfect for anyone tending a root cellar. Simply combine enough of your favorite roots to feed your guests. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, rutabagas, carrots, beets, parsnips and more all combine beautifully together for a simple and satisfying side dish.

Get the recipe…

.

.

 

~ Dessert ~

Lost Nation Cider Pie

The Apple Grower

From

The Apple Grower

From The Apple Grower: A Guide for the Organic Orchardist, Second Edition

Your classic apple pie gets an interesting spin from apple (and peach, and plum, and pear, and berry) expert Michael Phillips. Try his recipe for Lost Nation Cider Pie.

Phillips’s book The Apple Grower has long been the best resource for anyone interested in growing these ubiquitous fruits organically. Now aspiring orchardists can learn about other tree fruits, and berries, (and even more about apples) with Phillips’s new book The Holistic Orchard.

If there’s anything that will inspire you to start growing your own fruit trees, it’s a tangy, scrumptious pie. Enjoy!

Got pie? Get the recipe…

 

 

New and Noteworthy Book Sets on Sale:

Sandor Katz Fermentation SetEliot Coleman Set Preserving the Harvest Set

Weston A. Price Foundation Conference this Weekend

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012

Leading the vanguard for food freedom, especially for those who believe in the health benefits of raw, fermented foods, is the Weston A. Price Foundation. Named after a dentist who studied traditional foodways and discovered that processed foods and wheat and high-tech fats were not present in the healthiest, non-industrialized diets, the Weston A. Price Foundation has chapters around the country, and gathers them all together for a conference each year.

This year’s conference is in Santa Clara, California, and three Chelsea Green authors will be speaking.

Come hear the gospel of fermentation from Sandor Katz on Friday, November 9 from 10AM-Noon. Katz’s new book The Art of Fermentation is a New York Times Bestseller, and has been inspiring fermentos everywhere to try new recipes and discover frisky new beneficial microbes to befriend.

Learn about the blessings and challenges that come with the territory of running a small-scale dairy from Gianaclis Caldwell on Sunday, November 11, from 4:00-5:20PM. Caldwell is the owner and cheesemaker at Pholia Farm in Oregon, and her new book, Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking caused early reviewers who got it to respond primarily in exclamation points and smiley faces. Okay, not quite, but if you read the praise the book garnered from expert cheesemakers and ‘mongers you’ll see what we mean.

And finally, listen to a rallying keynote speech from anti-GMO crusader Jeffrey Smith on Sunday evening at 5:30 PM. Smith has been eloquently waging war against GMO foods for years, with his books and videos decrying the corruption and danger these high-tech, low-nutrition foods contain. This year, Smith has been campaigning in California to support Proposition 37 to label GMO foods in the state. By the time of the Weston Price conference we should know the fate of Prop 37, so it’s hard to say whether this keynote will be a victory yell or a call to regroup and start the fight anew.

Chelsea Green is a longtime supporter of food rights and ideas for healthy eating that follow traditional notions — not industrial era fads. We’ve collected our best food and health books in an easy-to-read catalog which you can download here.

Get all the conference information here, and stop by our booth if you’re around! Staffers Michael Weaver and Jennifer McCharen will be there to sell books and answer questions.

Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Lynn Margulis

Monday, November 5th, 2012

Lynn Margulis: The Life and Legacy of A Scientific Rebel is now available in our bookstore.

Publishers Weekly recently praised the collection, saying, “There are two kinds of great scientists, writes former American Society of Microbiology president Moselio Schaechter in this eclectic, sometimes electrifying, book about biologist Lynn Margulis. There are those making ‘impressive experiments’ and those making ‘groundbreaking theoretical syntheses.’ Margulis was the latter….This is a captivating read for anyone interested in what powers great scientists.”

Collated by Margulis’s son Dorion Sagan, the book includes contributions from many of Lynn’s colleagues and friends — all of them revolutionary thinkers of one kind or another. This unique anthology includes essays that cover her early collaboration with James Lovelock, her critique of neo-darwinism, her support of David Griffin’s critique of the official account of 9/11, her love of Emily Dickinson, her inspiration of young scientists, especially women, and much more.

Other recent reviews have also praised this collection of essays as a fitting tribute to a rebel who influenced, and inspired, many.

“Taken as a whole, Sagan’s collection is a fitting tribute to a woman whose life and legacy have touched so many others,” noted Foreword Reviews. “As [Sagan] notes, her indomitable spirit lives on through her children, grandchildren, colleagues, and students—and most of all, through the work that she championed so well.”

Don Mikulecky wrote this thoughtful and in-depth review of the book for DailyKos, saying, “If you know about Margulis’ work you still need to read this book because it is a multifaceted view of this magnificent person and her ideas and puts her wok into a context that enriches our understanding.”

Margulis was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1983, received the prestigious National Medal of Science in 1999, and her papers are permanently archived at the Library of Congress. Less than a month before her untimely death, Margulis was named one of the twenty most influential scientists alive— one of only two women on this list, which include such scientists as Stephen Hawking, James Watson, and Jane Goodall.


Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com