Archive for September, 2012


Pre-Release Special: Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking!

Sunday, September 30th, 2012

“I am truly knocked out by this wonderful book,” says Steven Jenkins, author of Cheese Primer. He goes on to say,

Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking is simply superb, and well-nigh flawless. Caldwell’s voice comes through so clear, friendly, and free of clinicality. I have learned so much that I didn’t realize I didn’t know. In fact, the book is so good I’m a little embarrassed that I didn’t even know how badly I needed it, and feel I am a vastly improved master cheesemonger for having been blessed with reading it.”

Gianaclis Caldwell’s new book has been praised for both its content and its gorgeous design. From Booklist’s review:

“The first point to make is that this oversize book is stunningly presented, with easy-on-the-eye text, helpfully broken up by subject headings, several on a page. And the photographic illustrations are in rich color and with clear detailing that makes the close-up shots comfortable on the eye as well. This handbook is for readers serious in their interest in and pursuit of home cheesemaking. With authority and clarity, the author delves deeply into the subject, explaining all the scientific aspects of the processes involved (in her words, ‘the beautiful interplay of science and art that goes into creating truly great cheeses’), including measuring acid development, aging cheese, adding flavors to cheese, and thinking about various ideas for equipment and work space.”

But you don’t have to take anyone else’s word for it. Take a look at the excerpt below, and learn a little about washed rind, surface-ripened cheeses.

Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking will be on sale for 25% off until October 7.

Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking: Washed Rind Surface-Ripened Cheeses

Blood Moon Recipe from Full Moon Feast: Swedish Meatballs

Friday, September 28th, 2012

The following recipe was adapted for the Web from Full Moon Feast: Food and the Hunger for Connection by Jessica Prentice.

In midautumn, when the air is growing colder and the nights longer, comes the Blood Moon. Also called the Hunter’s Moon by indigenous peoples in the eastern woodlands, it was a time when northern dwellers of many cultures would work to ensure that their store of meat would last the winter. They did this by hunting wild game or slaughtering farm animals. It was a time of year when blood was shed.

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Swedish Meatballs
Serves 3–4

Swedish meatballs are traditionally served with boiled potatoes and lingonberry jam. I often eat them with mashed potatoes, and a dollop of sauerkraut, and a fresh green vegetable. Lingonberry or another tart jam goes beautifully as well. I add liver for increased nutrition.

  • 1 pound ground grass-fed beef or other red meat
  • 3-ounce liver from grass-fed ruminant animal
  • 1/2 onion, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 1 handful parsley leaves—or substitute celery leaves or a lesser quantity of lovage leaves
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2–5 tablespoons sourdough bread crumbs, sprouted flour (or cereal), or stiff raw sourdough, as needed
  • 1 teaspoon Celtic sea salt, or other high-quality salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried herbs such as thyme, sage, marjoram, oregano, or rosemary (optional)
  • 1–3 tablespoons tallow, lard, or other fat
  • 1 cup beef (or other) broth, brought to a simmer (covered) in a small pan with a few parsley stems, slices of onion, and a bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon kuzu or arrowroot dissolved in 1/4 cup cold milk or broth
  • 1/4 cup créme fraîche
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  1. Put the ground beef into a bowl.
  2. In a food processor, place the liver, onion, and parsley leaves, and process by pulsing into a coarse texture.
  3. Add the egg yolk and 2 tablespoons of the bread crumbs, flour, or sourdough to the food processor. Also add the salt, pepper, and dried herbs, then pulse until well mixed.
  4. Add the contents of the food processor to the ground beef and mix thoroughly. If the mixture is too wet, add more bread crumbs or flour until you can form balls with your hands.
  5. Form the meat into balls about 1 1/2 inches in diameter.
  6. Heat the tallow or other fat in a skillet over medium-high heat. When the fat is hot, add the meatballs in a single layer without crowding. (You will probably need to cook them in two batches.)
  7. After the bottoms of the meatballs are cooked, gently turn them so that they can cook on another side. Continue until they are cooked on all sides and all the way through. Keep warm on a plate.
  8. Strain the beef broth into the skillet and scrape up all the browned bits into the broth as it cooks. Simmer for a few minutes to reduce.
  9. Add the kuzu or arrowroot mixture to the pan and whisk until thick. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Whisk in the créme fraîche.
  10. If the meatballs are too cool, you can return them to the gravy to warm up. Otherwise, pour the gravy over the meatballs.

New Arrival: Top-Bar Beekeeping!

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

Top-Bar Beekeeping is here!

Bees are vitally important to the health of our food systems, and this new book on a natural method of raising them comes at the perfect time to help small-scale beekeepers do their part to help keep the bees themselves healthy.

A recent review in Publishers Weekly praised the book:

“Crowder and his wife, Harrell, leave no comb unharvested as they take the top-bar aspirant from bee basics (stings, smoke, and hive transfers) through hive management (comb removal and feeding) to beneficial, and profitable, byproducts like beeswax. For those a bit lukewarm to the swarm, the book gives a fascinating insight into bees’ elaborate organizational and geometry skills, and it may even make one reconsider buying mass-marketed, chemical-laced honey.”

Listen to what the authors have to say about their journey with top-bar hives. In this interview with Bee Mentor, you’ll get an inside look at the life experiences that led Les Crowder to switch from Langstroth to top bar bee hives, how wax moths can be beneficial to honeybee colonies, the pros and cons of top bar beekeeping, and how Les single-handedly chased a bear off his apiary.

And lastly, take a peek into the book itself. Read Chapter One – Top-Bar Hives, below:
Top-Bar Hives – An Excerpt from Top-Bar Beekeeping by Les Crowder and Heather Harrell

Join the Revolution: The Seed Underground

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012

“Our seeds are disappearing. When seed varieties vanish from the marketplace they evaporate not only from collective memory, but also from the evolutionary story of the Earth.” So says author Janisse Ray, in the book trailer for her latest work of nonfiction, The Seed Underground.

Ray has been called the Rachel Carson of the South, loved for her eloquent and passionate essays and books about the natural environment.

Her latest book, The Seed Underground, takes her on a journey across the country to witness a small but growing revolution: people growing cherished, unique food plants, saving their seeds, sharing them, and helping to preserve the rich diversity of our food heritage along the way.

Recently The Atlanta Journal Constitution said,

“If a rally could be contained in the pages of a book, The Seed Underground is one, its language by turns incantatory, pleading, rabble-rousing, a challenge to rise to the occasion, to ‘man up or lie there and bleed.’

From the stirring call to reclaim our seeds — ‘developed by our ancestors, grown by them and by us, and collected for use by our citizenry’ — to their irresistible names, like Little White Lady pea, Speckled Cut Short Cornfield bean, Purple Blossom Brown-Striped Half-runner bean and Blue Java pea, Ray boldly seduces us into joining this critical and much-needed revolution.”

Janisse was featured on American Public Media’s radio show Marketplace, discussing the science and business of seeds. Listen here.

Catch a glimpse of the author’s home farm in her charming, brief book trailer for The Seed Underground:

“Eating is an Agricultural Act.”

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Every meal you choose can affect the world around you. From the carbon footprint of what’s in your sandwich to the way you cook your pasta.

Here at Chelsea Green we believe that food is one of the best ways to start thinking about sustainability. Food connects us to the Earth, and to all the other beings we depend upon. So thinking about food can lead a person to care for those beings, make choices that heal instead of harm, and consider the deep meanings associated with this simplest of needs.

September is Food Education Month, but we’re always learning about food! We explore the tiniest creatures that make our sauerkraut and yogurt tangy, the leafy greens and perennial fruits that fill our gardens, and the big guys, chickens and cattle, that help keep pastures lush and stews hearty.

To help you continue your food education, we’ve put a selection of books on sale until October 2. Enjoy!

The Art of Fermentation cover image
Reg. Price: $39.95

Sale Price: $25.97

The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from Around the World

In his new book, Katz expertly contextualizes fermentation in terms of biological and cultural evolution, health and nutrition, and even economics — but this is primarily a compendium of practical information. In it you will learn how the processes work; parameters for safety; techniques for effective preservation; troubleshooting; and more.

Sandor Katz featured in the New York Times Dining section!

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Cheese and Culture cover image
Reg. Price: $24.95

Sale Price: $18.71

Cheese and Culture: A History of Cheese and its place in Western Civilization

Cheese isn’t just the most delicious food group in the pyramid — wait, you say cheese isn’t a food group? Huh… Well let’s not argue over piddly details. Let’s take a look at the history of this unctuous, pungent, beautiful food! Paul Kindstedt’s new book Cheese and Culture shows that western civilization is closely associated with cheese — and has been for thousands of years.

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Reg. Price: $21.95

Sale Price: $16.46

The Farmer and the Grill: A Guide to Grilling, Barbecuing and Spit-Roasting Grassfed Meat…and for saving the planet one bite at a time

It’s been said that a vegan diet can save the planet. But if you’re not willing or able to give up the pleasures of steak, chicken, pork, and other meats, another great option is to go grass-fed. The key to getting the most out of pasture-raised meats, though, is understanding how to cook them properly. In The Farmer and the Grill, Hayes offers useful tips on grilling, barbecuing, and spit-roasting all cuts of pasture-raised meats: beef, lamb, pork, and poultry.

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Reg. Price: $24.95

Sale Price: $18.71

Meat: A Benign Extravagance

To further the small-scale, grass-fed, organic-or-beyond-meat agenda, we present Simon Fairlie’s fairly encyclopedic tome, Meat. Fairlie’s research argues for permaculture — not a vegan diet. He says that, while we in the west currently eat far too much meat to be sustainable, there is a way to include meat in a planet-friendly diet. If you’re expecting to get into a heated discussion with your vegetarian sister over Thanksgiving, it’d be great to have this book’s valuable info under your belt!

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Reg. Price: $40.00

Sale Price: $26.00

Whole Foods Companion: A Guide for Adventurous Cooks, Curious Shoppers, and Lovers of Natural Foods

If you’re the kind of cook who loves to know all about her ingredients, this is the book for you. With entries on more than 400 foods, you will discover nutritional value, general information, buying tips, culinary uses, and, when appropriate, health benefits, lore and legend, by-products, and descriptions of the more popular varieties. Whole Foods Companion is a detailed and invaluable guide for all curious cooks.

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Waste, An Excerpt from The Carbon-Free Home.

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Ever wonder why we humans insist on wasting our human waste? Well, no. Probably not. But I have. And so have Stephen and Rebekah Hren, authors of our new release The Carbon-Free Home: 36 Remodeling Projects to Help Kick the Fossil-Fuel Habit.

The following excerpted chapter makes clear that—given the right technologies—we can put our own waste to good use as fertilizer, compost, and even as a source of electricity. That’s right: power your home with your own bowel byproducts! The chapter below has directions and schematics that show you how to build your own biogas digester.

But there’s more to reusing waste than just dookie. The Hrens have created a great system for capturing and reusing laundry water, dish water, and shower water.

Reduce your carbon footprint, save money, and make plenty of poop jokes.

Be sure to check out the Hren’s newest book, A Solar Buyer’s Guide for the Home and Office!

And for a chance to win this and nine other books on sustainable living, sign up for our Homesteading Month Giveaway, in partnership with Mother Earth News!

Come on Down to the Fair!

Friday, September 21st, 2012

We’ll see you there!

The Mother Earth News Fair starts today in Seven Springs, Pennsylvania, and it’s sure to be a jam-packed weekend full of homesteader advice, from canning and pickling, to green building and cheesemaking!

Nine Chelsea Green authors will be giving talks or presentations, including Jacob Deva Racusin and Ace McArleton (The Natural Building Companion), Philip Ackerman-Leist (Up Tunket Road), Sandor Katz (The Art of Fermentation), David Gumpert (The Raw Milk Revolution), Janisse Ray (The Seed Underground), Mat Stein (When Disaster Strikes), Gianaclis Caldwell (Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking), and Joel Salatin (The Sheer Ecstasy of Being a Lunatic Farmer). Whew!

Plus, Chelsea Green staffers (and owners) Michael Weaver, Jennifer McCharen, and Darrell Koerner will be staffing our booth, selling books, and answering questions. Our authors will be hanging out at the booth when they’re not giving talks or signing books, so if you’re at the fair please drop by and say hello.

At the last Mother Earth News Fair in Puyallup, Washington, our booth was a happening place. Gianaclis Caldwell, author of the much-anticipated book Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking, brought three of her delicious, aged raw goat’s milk cheeses and fans lined up to taste them. They also had plenty of questions about their own experiments with sustainable dairy, and Gianaclis was happy to offer advice.

Mat Stein was there to shake hands and answer questions (he’s in the photo to the right, behind Gianaclis and an excited cheese-fan), and Peg Schafer showed off a gorgeous spread of her organically-raised herbs for Traditional Chinese Medicine.

September is Homesteading Month, and the fair promises to be a celebration of down-to-earth skills, and a convergence of planet-friendly, resilience-minded folks. We hope to see you there!

If you can’t make it, you can still be part of the fun. We’re running a special Homesteading Month giveaway with Mother Earth News, and you could be the winner of a starter library of eight essential books to add to your shelf. For more information on how to enter, click here!

Pre-Release Special: Top-Bar Beekeeping!

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Beekeeping is all the buzz these days. Honey loving people are setting up hives in backyards, on rooftops, and empty lots. Even our first lady, Michele Obama, has bees in the White House kitchen garden!

Most of the hives you see are the boxy industrial sort, and these are usually fitted with plastic sheets that guide the bees’ comb-making into straightforward, rational, flat, and easy-to use shapes. They’re perfect for the commercial production of honey, but bees aren’t made to build that way. Left to their own devices they’ll build combs in rounded, fractal shapes — and a new movement in beekeeping says that’s the healthiest way they can do it, and may help thwart colony collapse disorder.

Our new book, Top-Bar Beekeeping: Organic Practices for Honeybee Health, explains the why and how of this innovative hive design, and to celebrate it’s arrival we’ve put it on sale for 25% off until September 27.

“This is an excellent guide for hobby beekeepers who wish to keep bees using top-bar hives. Drawing on his more than 30 years of beekeeping experience in New Mexico, author Les Crowder describes in detail the special comb management techniques that this low-cost, but relatively intensive, form of beekeeping requires. Top-Bar Beekeeping also provides an eloquent appeal for beekeepers to make, care, respect, and revere the foundation of their relationships with the bees.”  —Thomas D. Seeley, Cornell University; author of Honeybee Democracy and The Wisdom of the Hive

With full-color photos throughout, plus charts to explain key concepts, Top-Bar Beekeeping will take you from building your first hive, to caring for your swarm, harvesting honey, and putting that extra beeswax to good use.

Get a copy this week, and save 25%!

Hot Off the Press: Our Latest Releases are on Sale!

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

Not only is it harvest season for many gardeners and farmers, it’s also time for us to bring to market our fall crop of new books!

From artisan cheese making and Nordic baking, to top-bar beekeeping and growing organic seeds to empowering your community through local energy or slow democracy, we have the books that will guide you on your path toward greater self-reliance and sustainability.

We strive to publish the kinds of books that you and your neighbors will turn to again and again. Our books are written by experts in their respective fields; people who care deeply about the planet and its people. The end result are books that contain both a holistic understanding of natural systems, and detailed, how-to ways to fine tune your personal skills.

Happy reading from the folks at Chelsea Green Publishing! 

P.S. Don’t forget to check out our full list of books on sale here: http://www.chelseagreen.com/bookstore/sale

Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking: The Ultimate Guide for Home-Scale and Market Producers

Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking Cover Image
Retail Price: $40.00
Sale Price: $26.00

The key to becoming a successful artisan cheesemaker is to develop the intuition essential for problem solving, and creating unique styles of cheeses.

There are an increasing number of books on the market about making cheese, but none approach the intricacies of cheesemaking science alongside considerations for preparing each type of cheese variety in as much detail as Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking.

Let Gianaclis Caldwell be your mentor, guide, and cheering section as you follow the pathway to a mastery of cheesemaking. For the avid home hobbyist, to the serious commercial artisan, Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking is an irreplaceable resource.

Read an excerpt on Washed Rind Surface-Ripened Cheeses…

Top-Bar Beekeeping: Organic Practices for Honeybee Health

Top-Bar Beekeeping Cover Image
Retail Price: $24.95 
Sale Price: $16.22

More and more beekeepers are now using top-bar hives, which resemble a hollow log. Long-lasting and completely biodegradable, a top-bar hive made of untreated wood allows bees to build comb naturally rather than simply filling prefabricated foundation frames in a typical box hive with added supers.

Top-Bar Beekeeping provides complete information on hive management and other aspects of using these innovative hives. Home and hobbyist beekeepers who have the time and interest in keeping bees should consider the natural, low-stress methods outlined in this book. It will also appeal to home orchardists, gardeners, and permaculture practitioners who look to bees for pollination as well as honey or beeswax.

 

Read an excerpt: Chapter One…

Home Baked: Nordic Recipes and Techniques for Organic Bread and Pastry

Home Baked Cover Image
Retail Price: $39.95
Sale Price: $25.97

The growing movement of Nordic cuisine centers on its devotion to high-quality regional produce, the creativity of the chef, and a sound awareness of the workings of nature—a set of principles that guides author Hanne Risgaard in Home Baked.

With enticing, full-color photographs throughout, Home Baked offers recipes and techniques for baking artisan bread and pastry using organic, nutrient-rich grain and stone-milled flour.

Read an excerpt and see some sample recipes…

 

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Power from the People: How to Organize, Finance, and Launch Local Energy Projects

Power from the People Cover Image
Retail Price: $19.95
Sale Price: $12.97

More than ninety percent of the electricity we use to light our communities, and nearly all the energy we use to run our cars, heat our homes, and power our factories, comes from large, centralized, highly polluting, nonrenewable sources of energy.

It doesn’t have to be that way. In Power from the People, energy expert Greg Pahl explains how American communities can plan, finance, and produce their own local, renewable energy that is reliable, safe, and clean.

Read an excerpt: Energy and our Communities…

 

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Dreaming the Future: Reimagining Civilization in the Age of Nature

Dreaming the Future Cover Image
Retail Price: $17.95 
Sale Price: $11.67

The world is entering a period of great change. The environment is collapsing. Social disruption abounds. All around, it seems, societies are experiencing breakdown—even collapse.

Out of this chaos, however, comes the opportunity to avoid a complete breakdown and instead foster a breakthrough. It is time, argues award-winning social entrepreneur, author, journalist, and filmmaker Kenny Ausubel, to reimagine our future and our connection to each other, and to nature.

In Dreaming the Future, Ausubel tracks the big ideas, metatrends, and game-changing developments of our time being led by some of the world’s greatest thinkers.

Read an excerpt: Honey, We Shrunk the Planet

 

Slow Democracy: Rediscovering Community, Bringing Decision Making Back Home

Slow Democracy Cover Image
Retail Price: $19.95

Sale Price: $12.97

Available: 10/15/12

Community leader Susan Clark and democracy scholar Woden Teachout document the range of ways that citizens around the country are breathing new life into participatory democracy in their communities.

Large institutions and centralized governments, with top-down, expert-driven thinking, are no longer society’s drivers. In fact, they are often responsible for tearing communities apart. New decision-making techniques now pair with cutting-edge communication tools to make local communities—and the citizens who live there—uniquely suited to meet today’s challenges.

Along with real-life examples of slow democracy in action, Slow Democracy also provides twenty simple guidelines for communities, and citizens, to use as ways to reinvigorate their local democratic process.

BROWSE THE ENTIRE BOOK…

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Nuclear Roulette: The Truth about the Most Dangerous Energy Source on Earth

Nuclear Roulette Cover Image
Retail Price: $29.95
Sale Price: $19.47

Available: 11/1/12

Nuclear power is not clean, cheap, or safe. With Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima, the nuclear industry’s record of catastrophic failures now averages one major disaster every decade. After three US-designed plants exploded in Japan, many countries moved to abandon reactors for renewables. In the United States, however, powerful corporations and a compliant government still defend nuclear power—while promising billion-dollar bailouts to operators.

 

Nuclear Roulette dismantles the core arguments behind the nuclear-industrial complex’s “Nuclear Renaissance.” While some critiques are familiar—nuclear power is too costly, too dangerous, and too unstable—others are surprising. Nuclear Roulette exposes historic links to nuclear weapons, impacts on Indigenous lands and lives, and how the Nuclear Regulatory Commission takes its lead from industry, rewriting rules to keep failing plants in compliance.

Read the Foreword and Introduction…

Lynn Margulis: The Life and Legacy of a Scientific Rebel

Lynn Margulis Cover Image
Retail Price: $27.95

Sale Price: $18.17

Available: 10/23/12

Tireless, controversial, and hugely inspirational to those who knew her or encountered her work, Lynn Margulis was a scientist whose intellectual energy and interests knew no bounds. Best known for her work on the origins of eukaryotic cells, the Gaia hypothesis, and symbiogenesis as a driving force in evolution, her work has forever changed the way we understand life on Earth.

When Margulis passed away in 2011, she left behind a groundbreaking scientific legacy that spanned decades. In this collection, Dorion Sagan, Margulis’s son and longtime collaborator, gathers together the voices of friends and colleagues to remark on her life and legacy.

Read “On Lynn” from friend and colleague James Lovelock…

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Taste, Memory: Forgotten Foods, Lost Flavors, and Why They Matter

Taste Memory Cover Image
Retail Price: $17.95
Sale Price: $11.67

Available: 11/5/12

Taste, Memory traces the experiences of modern-day explorers who rediscover culturally rich forgotten foods and return them to our tables for all to experience and savor.

Author David Buchanan shares stories of slightly obsessive urban gardeners, preservationists, environmentalists, farmers, and passionate cooks, and weaves anecdotes of his personal journey with profiles of leaders in the movement to defend agricultural biodiversity.

Taste, Memory begins and ends with a simple premise: that a healthy food system depends on matching diverse plants and animals to the demands of land and climate. In this sense of place lies the true meaning of local food.

Read Chapter One: Seeds of an Idea… 

 

More New and Noteworthy Titles On Sale

How to Grow Perennial Vegetables coverPeople and Permaculture coverConvergence with Nature coverWeeders Digest coverLong way on a Little cover
Build Your Own Barrel Oven coverThe Seed Underground coverFuture Money coverFruit Tree Handbook coverSustainable Food cover

 

Sandor Katz Featured in the New York Times

Monday, September 17th, 2012

The Art of Fermentation, the latest book from fermentation revivalist Sandor Katz, has been a huge hit with fermentos and foodies alike. Earlier this summer the book’s popularity landed it a coveted spot on the New York Times Bestseller list. On Wednesday Katz and his art will lead the front page of the New York Times Dining section.

But, you can read the article now online because the Times is hosting a Q&A with Katz, who is fielding all kinds of fermentation queries. Here’s a sample:

“Say this about Sandor Ellix Katz: the man knows how to get you revved up to eat bacteria.

‘Oh, this is nice kimchi,’ he said on a summer afternoon at Momofuku Noodle Bar, using chopsticks to pull crimson-coated knuckles of Napa cabbage from a jar. ‘I like the texture of the sauce. It’s kind of thick.’

Kimchi, like sauerkraut, is one of the world’s great fermented foods, and Mr. Katz, a resident of Tennessee, was curious to see what David Chang’s team of cooks in the East Village would do with it. Lately Mr. Katz has become for fermentation what Timothy Leary was for psychedelic drugs: a charismatic, consciousness-raising thinker and advocate who wants people to see the world in a new way.”

Katz and Times reporter Jeff Gordinier chat about the microbial revolution that has been sweeping the food world — with Katz as key instigator, cheerleader, and teacher. Then they grab lunch at the renowned restaurant Momofuku Noodle Bar, and explore Chef David Chang’s own bubbly, funky, ferments.

“Naturally, a seeker like Sandor Katz couldn’t resist an invitation to visit Momofuku’s laboratory of fermentation, so after lunch he took a short stroll to an unmarked sliver of office space in the East Village, where he met Dan Felder, the 28-year-old head of R&D for Mr. Chang’s network of restaurants.

There, in the Momofuku test kitchen, Mr. Felder gave Mr. Katz a glimpse of a brilliantly demented-fermented future: Erlenmeyer flasks full of new iterations of soy sauce, jars of vinegar conjured up from ingredients like strawberries and cherries, little mounds of paste that represented the next wave in miso.”

Read the entire article here, and if you find yourself dying to know more, you’re in luck! You can also check out the online Q&A with Sandor here on the Times’ Dining blog. Got a burning question about your kimchi or sourdough? The master is in, and he’s happy to help!


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