Archive for August, 2012


Corn Moon Recipe: Calabacitas with Herbed Crema

Friday, August 31st, 2012

The intense drought this summer has wreaked havoc on the midwestern farming regions. Author and farmer Gene Logsdon’s neighbors lost most of their corn. And with biotech companies introducing the first GMO sweet corn to markets this summer, we’re thinking the Corn Moon is a bit of a mixed blessing this year. Between the crazy climate and insane corporations, there’s plenty of food for thought as the harvest season approaches — if not quite as much food for our bellies as we had hoped.

What better time to reconnect with a traditional understanding of the seasons? This recipe from Full Moon Feast ought to help.

The following recipe has been excerpted from Full Moon Feast: Food and the Hunger for Connection by Jessica Prentice.

The ancient Celts and many Native American peoples called the lunar phase that fell on the cusp of summer and fall—when the grains were ripe in the field and ready to be harvested—the Corn Moon.

Serves 3–4

Calabacitas

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, butter, or other fat
  • 2 large leeks or onions, diced
  • 5 medium summer squash such as crookneck, yellow zucchini, or zucchini, cut in half lengthwise and sliced on the diagonal
  • Leaves from 1 sprig fresh marjoram or oregano; or 2 sage leaves, minced
  • 3 ears corn, kernels cut off the cob
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth (page 299) or filtered water (or more as needed)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 medium heirloom tomatoes (or 1 large, or a few small), diced into small cubes
  1. Heat the olive oil (or other fat) in a heavy-bottomed shallow pan or skillet over medium heat. Add the leeks or onions and sauté until translucent but not brown.
  2. Add the squash and sauté until it just begins to brown.
  3. Add the minced marjoram, oregano, or sage to the pan, then immediately add the corn kernels. Stir for a minute.
  4. Add the broth or water and a generous pinch each of salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer. Add more liquid if it gets too dry.
  5. Simmer for 2 to 3 minutes, then add the tomatoes. Heat the tomatoes through, then taste and adjust the seasonings as necessary, and remove from the heat.

Herbed Crema

  • 3 scallions, a small bunch of chives, or the tender inner greens of leeks
  • 1/2 bunch cilantro
  • 1/2 cup créme fraîche, sour cream, or Mexican crema
  1. Slice the scallions, chives, or leek greens into small rounds.
  2. Cut the leaves off the cilantro.
  3. Mince the scallions (or chives or leek greens) and cilantro together on a cutting board, or process in a food processor.
  4. Stir the minced herbs into the créme fraîche (or sour cream, or crema).
  5. To serve, ladle the calabacitas into a shallow bowl and add a big dollop of herbed crema. Eat with tortillas or quesadillas, if desired. This is nice served with a salad topped with roast chicken (such as leftovers from Simplest Roast Chicken, page 226).

Last Chance: Enter to Win Eight Great Green Books!

Thursday, August 30th, 2012

In partnership with Mother Earth News, Chelsea Green is offering you the chance to win eight of our newest books on the politics and practice of sustainability!

The most popular and longest running sustainable-lifestyle magazine, Mother Earth News provides wide-ranging, expert editorial coverage of organic foods, country living, green transportation, renewable energy, natural health and green building. Lively, insightful and on the cutting edge, Mother Earth News is the definitive read for the growing number of Americans who choose wisely and live well.

Sign up soon. The giveaway closes August 31!

The eight books are…

The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from Around the World by Sandor Ellix Katz
Quite simply, the most comprehensive guide to do-it-yourself home fermentation ever published.
Sowing Seeds in the Desert: Natural Farming, Global Restoration, and Ultimate Food Security by Masanobu Fukuoka
This revolutionary book presents Fukuoka’s plan to rehabilitate the deserts of the world using natural farming, and provides a deep understanding of the relationship between human beings and nature.
The Holistic Orchard: Tree Fruits and Berries the Biological Way by Michael Phillips
Extensive profiles of how to grow raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, gooseberries, currants, and elderberries will have you savoring the prospects of your very own berry patch.
The Chinese Medicinal Herb Farm: A Cultivator’s Guide to Small-Scale Organic Herb Production by Peg Schafer
The first cultivation guide of its kind, presenting invaluable information for growers interested in producing high-quality efficacious herbs in all climates of the US.
Cheese and Culture: A History of Cheese and its place in Western Civilization by Paul Kindstedt
A comprehensive look at the 9,000-year history of cheese, the ways in which it has shaped civilization, and what it can tell us about the future of food.
A Sanctuary of Trees: Beechnuts, Birdsongs, Baseball Bats, and Benedictions by Gene Logsdon
As author Gene Logsdon puts it, “We are all tree huggers.” In this latest book he offers a loving tribute to the woods.
The Transition Companion: Making Your Community More Resilient in Uncertain Times by Rob Hopkins
What if the best responses to peak oil and climate change don’t come from government, but from you and me and the people around us?
Slow Gardening: A No-Stress Philosophy for All Senses and Seasons by Felder Rushing
Slow Gardening will inspire you slip into the rhythm of the seasons, take it easy, and get more enjoyment out of your garden, all at the same time.

Sign up here.

Van Jones: Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

“We are entering the tough terrain of an unforgiving new century. But there is a path forward,” says Jones in this excerpt from Greg Pahl’s book, Power from the People.

This book rests an optimistic message on a pessimistic premise.

The sobering underlying thesis is that human civilization is already in big trouble—both ecologically and economically. And things are set to get much worse. The hopeful underlying message is that we still have the capacity to pull good outcomes from even the most frightening scenarios.

The paradox is this: Only by recognizing how much worse things can get can we muster the energy and creativity to win a better future. In that regard, the book you hold in your hands is not just an action guide; it is a survival guide.

The Bad News Is Very Bad

At this late date, there is no point in mincing words about the impending series of calamities. The global production of oil will soon peak, ending forever the era of cheap crude. The resulting price spikes and fuel shortages could throw all of industrial society into an ugly death spiral. Worse still: We have seen only the earliest examples of the kind of biblical disasters—the super-storms, wildfires, floods, and droughts—that climate experts predict are in the pipeline, even if we cease all carbon emissions immediately.

The polar ice caps haven’t melted yet; if they do, they will send temperatures and sea levels soaring, forcing us to redraw every coastal map in the world. Even under the friendliest scenarios, we will likely see food systems disrupted, life-sustaining fuels priced beyond reach for many, and our health challenged as tropical super-bugs invade formerly temperate climes. On a hotter planet, we could face the choice between water rationing and water riots. As stressful as the present moment is, worse times are possible—and even likely.

At the same time, the majority of the world’s people now live in cities. And though cities cover only 2 percent of Earth’s surface, they already consume 75 percent of the planet’s natural resources. As more people continue crowding into cities, that figure will climb even higher, which means urban areas have become the main driver in the ecological crisis. Many cities are sinkholes of human suffering, especially for a marginalized population of low-income earners and people of color. And in the United States, the word urban has become synonymous with the word problem. Many urban neighborhoods are plagued by economic desperation, violence, pollution, and crumbling infrastructure.

Climate change and the economic and equity crises of our communities may appear to have little in common, but they share a key determining factor—namely, our near-complete dependence on coal, oil, and natural gas. The carbon dioxide produced by driving our vehicles, heating (and cooling) our homes, and lighting our cities with fossil fuels is the main culprit behind climate change. Meanwhile, that same dependence on fossil fuels sucks billions of dollars every year out of communities across America, with the poorest households often hit hardest.

But what if we found ways to power our homes, businesses, factories, and vehicles that didn’t warm the planet, that kept local dollars circulating in local economies, and that even created local jobs? What if we spread those climate-friendly, local-economy-boosting, job-creating ideas to every city and town across the country?

Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst

It is too late for us to avert all of the negative consequences of 150 years of ecological folly and resource wastefulness. Our challenge is to begin implementing real changes, rapidly and from the bottom up. Certain bills are coming due, and certain chickens are coming home to roost, no matter what we do. But there are steps we can take to cushion the blow.

We must prepare ourselves (and our communities) for the worst possible outcomes. In considering the most pessimistic scenarios, we must talk less about economic growth and more about economic resilience; less about abundance and more about sufficiency; less about sustainability and more about survivability. It may be wise to consciously deploy our forces in a three- pronged, “trident” formation: some of us fixing the system from the inside, some of us pressuring the system from the outside, and some of us exercising the “lifeboat” option, thinking up alternative strategies for survival.

Power from the People is rare, because it gives some guidance on all three around the most important component of that system: energy.

You’ll read about courageous local government leaders finding creative ways to invest in local renewable energy; citizen activists pushing for (and winning) smarter regulations for green power; and entire communities taking matters into their own hands to prepare for an energy-scarcer future. Throughout the stories here, from both urban and rural communities, you’ll find a common theme all too often missing from the sustainability conversation: local prosperity . Local renewable energy is the heart of the new energy economy because it is the most obvious starting point for creating green jobs and generating local wealth. Local renewable energy puts the power in local empowerment.

By itself, however, even the most advanced local energy initiative can do little about our energy and environmental crises. Local actions must be multiplied to the level of movements . . . and nations.

Can America summon the strength, courage, and resolve to avert disaster and usher in a new age of sustainable prosperity? Both the ideas and the constituencies exist to turn the corner. We need a hard-hat-and-lunch- bucket brand of environmentalism . . . a we-can-fix-it environmentalism . . . a muscular, can-do environmentalism. We need a pro-ecology movement with its sleeves rolled up and its tool belt strapped on. We need a social uplift environmentalism that can fight poverty and pollution at the same time—by creating green-collar jobs for low-income people and displaced workers.

The time has come to birth a positive, creative, and powerful environmentalism, one deeply rooted in the lives, values, and needs of millions of ordinary people who work every day (or desperately wish they could).

We need an environmental movement that can put millions of people back to work, giving them the tools and the technologies they need to retrofit, re-engineer, and reboot the nation’s energy, water, and waste systems. Green-collar jobs can restore hope and opportunity to America’s failing middle-class and low-income families while honoring and healing the Earth. Those new jobs could create a ladder up and out of poverty for jobless urban residents. Under even the most depressing of scenarios, there certainly will be economic opportunities and green-collar jobs—from building dikes and levees and reconstructing devastated structures to installing community-owned wind turbines and operating renewable biofuel factories using regional feedstocks. The United States can fight global warming, energy scarcity, and poverty in the same stroke.

With 4 percent of the world’s population, the United States now produces 25 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas pollution. It also locks up 25 percent of the world’s prisoners in its domestic incarceration industry. Those numbers document the notion that too many U.S. business and political lead- ers govern as if we have both a disposable planet and disposable people.

As the new green economy springs to life, will we live in eco-equity or eco-apartheid? Will clean and green business flourish only in the rich, white parts of town? Will our kids be left to deal with the toxic wastes of polluting industries, the life-threatening diseases that decimate polluted communities, and the crushing lack of economic opportunity as the old polluting economy goes bust? How we answer these questions will impact the fate of billions of people.

On this crowded planet, we have responsibilities that extend beyond our national borders. Therefore, it is good to be a global citizen. But we must never forget: The very best gift that we can give to the world is a better America. The peoples of the world want and need our country to set a global example for human and environmental rights while being a global partner for peace and progress.

We are entering the tough terrain of an unforgiving new century. But there is a path forward. It is narrow and treacherous, but it leads to the best possible outcome for the largest number of people. And it starts with developing local renewable energy.

Van Jones is the co-Founder and president of Rebuild the Dream. Van is also a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, and American Progress Action Fund. He is the author of the bestselling book, The Green Collar Economy.

This excerpt appeared on AlterNet on August 21, 2012.

Build Up Your Library – It’s Architecture Month!

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

Humans are builders. Ever since the first ape figured out it was nicer to sleep under a couple of branches than out in the rain, we’ve been tinkering with the stuff of the Earth to make our lives a little nicer.

Nowadays, armed with high-tech information and analysis, and inspired by the urgent need to use resources with care, builders are returning to ancient and natural building techniques. Chelsea Green has long been the go-to publisher for natural building titles to guide and inspire projects as small as backyard sheds and as large as dream homes.

Because August is Architecture Month we’re putting the following books on sustainable building methods on sale for 25% off until September 1.

Whether you’d like to learn more about timber framing, straw bale, cob, or passive solar principles, we’ve got the book for you!

The Natural Building Companion: A Comprehensive Guide to Integrative Design and Construction

Natural buildings not only bring satisfaction to their makers and joy to their occupants, they also leave the gentlest footprint on the environment. In this complete reference to natural building philosophy, design, and technique, Jacob Deva Racusin and Ace McArleton walk builders through planning and construction, offering step-by-step instructions on siting, choosing materials, planning for heat and moisture, developing an integrative design, creating the foundation, wall system, roof, floors … and more.

Passive Solar Architecture: Heating, Cooling, Ventilation, Daylighting, and More Using Natural Flows

In this comprehensive overview of passive solar design, two of America’s solar pioneers give homeowners, architects, designers, and builders the keys to successfully harnessing the sun and maximizing climate resources for heating, cooling, ventilation, and daylighting.

 

The Hand-Sculpted House: A Practical and Philosophical Guide to Building a Cob Cottage

The Hand-Sculpted House is theoretical and philosophical, but intensely practical as well. You will get all the how-to information to undertake a cob building project. As the modern world rediscovers the importance of living in sustainable harmony with the environment, this book is a bible of radical simplicity.

 

The Straw Bale House

Imagine building a house with superior seismic stability, fire resistance, and thermal insulation, using an annually renewable resource, for half the cost of a comparable conventional home. Welcome to the straw bale house! Whether you build an entire house or something more modest-a home office or studio, a retreat cabin or guest cottage-plastered straw bale construction is an exceptionally durable and inexpensive option. What’s more, it’s fun, because the technique is easy to learn and easy to do yourself. And the resulting living spaces are unusually quiet and comfortable.

Selected titles will be on sale for 25% off until September 1.

Pre-Release Special: Dreaming the Future

Monday, August 27th, 2012

When Kenny Ausubel, an award-winning social entrepreneur, author, journalist, and filmmaker, and his wife Nina Simons started the Bioneers Conference in 1990, they gathered a diverse group of people who shared a dream about changing human society to make it more harmonious with nature.

In the spirit of that same dream, Ausubel’s new book is filled with inspiring thoughts about what our lives could look like — if only we try a little harder to live like good Earthlings instead of like shortsighted resource hogs with nothing to lose. In fact we have a great deal to lose — perhaps everything. It is time, argues Ausubel, to reimagine our future and our connection to each other, and to nature.

Dreaming the Future is a collection of essays by Ausubel, about the big ideas, metatrends, and game-changing developments of our time.

Paul Hawken, author of Blessed Unrest and coauthor of Natural Capitalism, says:

“Without doubt, Kenny Ausubel has one of the most glorious minds on the planet. Herein he has crafted a dazzling treasury of essays on the destiny of humanity and its place on earth, a rosary of startling truths. His ability to describe the cataclysmic loss of living systems contrasted with the luminous and untold rise of human awakening is unique among living writers and speakers. Read this for its brilliance, but read it also to find joy in the intricate reimagination of what it means to be a human being at this parlous moment in civilization.”

To celebrate the arrival of this poetic and imaginative new book, we’re putting it on sale for 25% off this week.

Yestermorrow Live: Join a Workshop with the Authors of The Natural Building Companion

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012

Join the authors of The Natural Building Companion for a workshop — right here!

Ace McArleton and Jacob Deva Racusin are hosting a lecture entitled High Performance Natural Buildings for Cold Climates. You don’t have to trek all the way to Yestermorrow — you can watch a live stream of the workshop right here on chelseagreen.com

Here’s some more information about the workshop:

It is critical to identify the role social and community-responsive practices play in providing long-term solutions to the ecological problems and other pressing issues we face.  In this workshop, we will examine the role that natural building can play in supporting these practices.  We will explore a variety of different natural building technologies in a series of different applications, and evaluate how to develop an appropriate strategy for their implementation.  This presentation will feature case study, research, building science principles, and philosophical arguments to support the role for natural building as a solution for building efficiency and resiliency.

Ace McArleton and Jacob Deva Racusin co-founded New Frameworks Natural Building (NFNB) in 2006 to offer green remodeling and new construction services that utilize the best that both natural building materials and methods and conventional construction practices have to offer.   Ace and Jacob have conducted field research on moisture and thermal performance of straw bale wall systems, which is featured in their book The Natural Building Companion (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2012).

And here’s the video!

Leeks: An Excerpt with Recipes from Wild Flavors

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012

“Leeks are long, slim, and glamorous…Cut straight through a leek and you can see the layers of white and green rings, like concentric growth rings of a tiny sapling.” – From Wild Flavors

Something amazing happened as soon as chef Didi Emmons, met eccentric farmer Eva Sommaripa — whose garden of uncommon herbs, greens, and edible “weeds” feeds many a famous restaurant in the Northeast. Not only did Eva’s Garden become Didi’s refuge and herb-infused Shangri-La, the two women also forged a lasting friendship that has blossomed and endured over time.

Wild Flavors, a cookbook filled with unexpected ingredients and surprising delights, is the fruit of that friendship. From new twists on old favorites like dill and sage, to recipes using plants you probably pass by each day and disregard as weeds — like “invasive sorbet” made from tangy Japanesse knotweed — Wild Flavors will wake up your tastebuds and give you new inspiration for a tasty and sustainable locavore life.

More than just recipes, Wild Flavors includes profiles on each plant with information about growing them, stories from Eva’s Garden, and preparation tips.

Here’s a section about the lovely leek, perfect with potatoes and sumptuous in soups:

Leeks – Plant Profile and Recipes from Wild Flavors

Award-Winning Books on Sale

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

Chelsea Green publishes books that readers return to year after year as they seek to build a more sustainable way of living—from homebuilding to homesteading. We think our books are great, but we’re more than a bit biased. That’s why it’s great when one of our authors wins an award—especially from an organization with a mission similar to ours like Nautilus or the John Burroughs Association.

We’re proud to recognize the achievements that many of Chelsea Green’s authors have earned this year. In celebration, we are putting the following award—winning books on sale for 35% off until September 15th.

Since 1984, Chelsea Green has published award-winning books that help you better examine your food choices, fuel systemic change, dig in to the joys of gardening, and organize for resilience within your community.

Happy reading from the folks at Chelsea Green Publishing, who like the authors below, also took home an award this year. We were named the 2011 Independent Publisher of the Year by ForeWord Reviews. Awww, shucks.

The Holistic Orchard: Tree Fruits and Berries the Biological Way

The Art of Fermentation Cover Image
Retail Price: $39.95
Sale Price: $25.97

WINNER: American Horticultural Society Book Award.

Each year, the American Horticultural Society recognizes outstanding gardening books published in North America with its annual Book Award. The Holistic Orchard was one of this year’s winners!

From the AHS press release: “This richly illustrated, comprehensive guide is like spending a weekend with the guru of organic orcharding…No other author covers the subject so completely, understands it so well, and still manages to make it accessible.”

KEEP READING…

Killing the Cranes: A Reporter’s Journey Through Three Decades of War in Afghanistan

The Seed Underground Cover Image
Retail Price: $19.95
Sale Price: $12.97

FINALIST: HELEN BERNSTEIN BOOK AWARD.

Ed Girardet was one of five finalists for the 2012 Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism for his memoir, Killing the Cranes.

Girardet’s memoir reflects on his more than three decades of experience covering war-torn Afghanistan, and the impact this has had on Afghani people. Established in 1987, the Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism is given annually to a journalist whose work has brought public attention to important issues.

Killing the Cranes is now available in Paperback! 


Reinventing Fire: Bold Business Solutions for the New Energy Era

Home Baked Cover Image
Retail Price: $34.95
Sale Price: $22.72

FOREWORD BOOK OF THE YEAR: Business and Economics, Gold.

Grounded in thirty years’ practical experience, this ground-breaking, peer-reviewed analysis integrates market-based solutions across transportation, buildings, industry, and electricity. It maps pathways and competitive strategies for a 158%-bigger 2050 U.S. economy that needs no oil, no coal, no nuclear energy, one-third less natural gas, and no new inventions.

At a ceremony on June 23 at ALA’s Annual Conference in Anaheim, California, ForeWord Reviews named Reinventing Fire a Gold winner in the Business and Economics category.

  KEEP READING…

 


Wild Flavors: One Chef’s Transformative Year Cooking from Eva’s Farm

Masonry Heaters Cover Image
Retail Price: $34.95 
Sale Price: $22.72

NAUTILUS AWARD GOLD WINNER: Food/Cooking/Healthy Eating.

When Didi Emmons, a chef from Boston, met Eva Sommaripa—a near legendary farmer whose 200-plus uncommon herbs, greens, and edible “weeds” grace the menus of many famous restaurants in the Northeast—something amazing happened. Wild Flavors follows a year at Eva’s Garden through the seasons and showcases Emmons’s talent for using unique herbs and surprising wild foods.

The Nautilus Awards recognize Books that promote spiritual growth, conscious living and positive social change, while at the same time stimulating the imagination and offering the reader new possibilities for a better life and a better world.

 

  KEEP READING…

 


The Transition Companion: Making Your Community More Resilient in Uncertain Times

Roundwood Timber Framing Cover Image
Retail Price: $29.95 
Sale Price: $19.47

NAUTILUS AWARD GOLD WINNER: Social Change.

What if the best responses to peak oil and climate change don’t come from government, but from you and me and the people around us?

In 2008, the best-selling Transition Handbook suggested a model for a community-led response to peak oil and climate change. The Transition Companion picks up the story today, telling inspiring tales of communities working for a future where local economies are valued and nurtured; where lower energy use is seen as a benefit; and where enterprise, creativity, and the building of resilience have become cornerstones of a new economy.

 

Sex and the River Styx

The Hand-Sculpted House Cover Image
Retail Price: $27.50 Sale Price: $17.88

WINNER: John Burroughs Medal for Outstanding Environmental Writing.

For more than 50 years, Hoagland has been one of America’s most celebrated observers of both human nature and the natural world. In Sex and the River Styx, readers follow Hoagland as he travels to Kampala, Uganda, Tibet and into his own personal memories as he ruminates about aging, love, and sex.

Hoagland’s sharp eye and intense curiosity shine through in essays that span his childhood exploring the woods in his rural Connecticut, his days as a circus worker, and travels in his later years.

The John Burroughs Medal has been given annually since 1926 for books that combine scientific accuracy, firsthand fieldwork, and creative natural history writing. KEEP READING…

Alone and Invisible No More: How Grassroots Community Action and 21st Century Technologies Can Empower Elders to Stay in Their Homes and Lead Healthier, Happier Lives

The Straw Bale House Cover Image
Retail Price: $17.95
Sale Price: $11.67

NAUTILUS AWARD SILVER WINNER: Aging Gracefully.

In Alone and Invisible No More, physician Allan S. Teel, MD, describes how to overhaul our eldercare system. Based on his own efforts to create humane, affordable alternatives in Maine, Teel’s program harnesses both staff and volunteers to help people remain in their homes and communities. It offers assistance with everyday challenges, uses technology to keep older people connected to each other and their families, and stay safe. This approach works.

 

The Nautilus Awards highlight books that make the world a better place. KEEP READING…

Old Southern Apples: A Comprehensive History and Description of Varieties for Collectors, Growers, and Fruit Enthusiasts

When Disaster Strikes Cover Image
Retail Price: $75.00
Sale Price: $48.75

BOOKBUILDERS OF BOSTON BEST IN CATEGORY WINNER: Reference.

A book that became an instant classic when it first appeared in 1995, Old Southern Apples is an indispensable reference for fruit lovers everywhere, especially those in the southern United States. Out of print for several years, this newly revised and expanded edition now features beautiful color illustrations and descriptions of some 1,800 apple varieties that either originated in the South or were widely grown there before 1928.

Each year Bookbuilders of Boston hosts The New England Book Show, an annual juried show that recognizes the year’s most outstanding work by New England publishers, printers and graphic designers. Winning books are selected for their design, quality of materials, and workmanship. KEEP READING…

 

Passive Solar Architecture: Heating, Cooling, Ventilation, Daylighting, and More Using Natural Flows

Local Dollars Local Sense Cover Image
Retail Price: $85.00
Sale Price: $55.25

BOOKBUILDERS OF BOSTON BEST IN CATEGORY WINNER: Professional, Illustrated.

In this comprehensive overview of passive solar design, two of America’s solar pioneers give homeowners, architects, designers, and builders the keys to successfully harnessing the sun and maximizing climate resources for heating, cooling, ventilation, and daylighting.

Bainbridge and Haggard draw upon examples from more than three decades to offer both overarching principles as well as the details and formulas needed to successfully design a more comfortable, healthy, and secure place in which to live.

Judges Comments: “Beautiful cover. Inventive and untraditional illustration program…” KEEP READING…

 

 

More New and Noteworthy Titles On Sale

Chanterelle Dreams coverThe Resilient Gardener coverThe Chinese Medicinal Herb Farm coverMaking the Most of your Glorious Glut coverNOFA Guides Set cover
Resilient Gardener coverThe Holistic Orchard coverPeople and Permaculture coverWild Flavors coverPerennial Vegetables cover

 

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* Books on sale until September 15th*

Novelist Anne Rice: The Mystery of Metamorphosis is “A gem of a book”

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Earlier this month Frank Ryan’s latest book, The Mystery of Metamorphosis, got some much-deserved praise from a very interesting source: novelist Anne Rice!

Rice was so taken with Ryan’s story about the misunderstood scientist Don Williamson, and his research that questions our typical understanding of how animals like caterpillars end up as beautiful butterflies, that she posted this to her Facebook wall:

“In Ryan, I’ve found another brilliant science writer, like Nick Lane, who makes available to the scientifically challenged some insight into the magnificence and mysteries of biological life on this planet. This is just a wonderful book. If you have, as I do, a million questions about how caterpillars become butterflies, and no science vocabulary to study it, well, this may be the book for you. This is beautifully written. A gem of a book.

The Mystery of Metamorphosis (UK edition) also received a nice review this month from Cosmos magazine:

“In an equally entertaining and informing fashion, Ryan guides his readers through the lives and works of some of the key figures who explored the mystery of metamorphosis, its mechanisms and its evolution. He interweaves prose with scientific facts and paints a vivid picture of his characters as he describes their theories and experiments as well as their personal struggles and achievements.”

If your curiosity is plenty piqued, you might enjoy reading this excerpt from the book, entitled “The Beautiful Mystery.”

The Mystery of Metamorphosis Prologue

New Arrival: Home Baked!

Monday, August 20th, 2012

The growing movement of Nordic cuisine centers on its devotion to high-quality regional produce, the creativity of the chef, and a sound awareness of the workings of nature—a set of principles that guides author Hanne Risgaard in our newest book Home Baked.

With gorgeous photographs throughout, Home Baked offers recipes and techniques for baking artisan bread and pastry using organic, nutrient-rich grain and stone-milled flour. The book comes from Skærtoft Mølle, the Risgaards’ farm on an island in the southeast of Denmark. Both in their farming, and in their baking, the Risgaards believe in organic, small-scale-production of whole grains, traditional techniques for milling and for capturing wild yeast, and paying attention to terroir. The care taken by the Risgaards has earned them the attention of intentional chefs, bakers, and food writers everywhere. Copenhagen’s celebrated restaurant NOMA, recently accorded a “World’s Best Restaurant” award, uses Skærtoft Mølle products.

Peter Reinhart, author of Whole Grain Breads and Artisan Breads Everyday, says:

“Many books capture the romance of baking, while others convey the nuts and bolts—but rarely does one book hit both chords at the same time. With Home Baked, Hanne Risgaard has written a practical, beautiful, and, most importantly, inspiring bread book for the ages. Every page, every recipe, makes me want to gather the grain with my own hands and transform it into earthy, delicious, and gorgeous loaves of bread.”

But don’t take our word for it — see for yourself!

To celebrate the arrival of Home Baked we’d like to share a few of the delectable recipes from the book: one for a bread scented with lavender, and one for a special lemon pie.

Enjoy!

An Excerpt from Home Baked by Hanne Risgaard


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