Archive for April, 2012


Amory Lovins: Cars need to go on a diet (video)

Monday, April 16th, 2012

Kids say the darnedest things. One of my favorite stories from childhood is a time my little brother made a shocking comment to our neighbor. She had sprained her ankle, and was talking about how it wasn’t healing rapidly enough. She was worried. She didn’t know what to do.

Little Andrew, being of the ultra-logical mindset, and eager to help, had a suggestion for her, “Why don’t you lose some weight?”

My mom’s face turned beet red, and she spluttered an apology to the neighbor, while Andrew smiled innocently, proud of his engineering assessment.

“Well, you’re probably right Andrew. Maybe that would help.” she said finally, a little crestfallen perhaps but not acutely offended.

My cheeky little brother isn’t the only one who thinks the world would be a better place if we had less weight to haul around. Turns out Amory Lovins thinks so too! Except he’s talking about manufacturing lighter automobiles to improve fuel efficiency. The video below goes into detail about this important step toward a fossil-fuel-free economy.

From CNET‘s SmartPlanet:

“We Americans aren’t the only ones who have gained weight. Over the past 25 years, our cars have gotten heavier too, says Amory Lovins.

Lovins, chief scientist of the Rocky Mountain Institute, says he believes that ultralight materials like carbon fiber composites can make cars simpler and cheaper to build. At the Cleantech Forum in San Francisco this week, Lovins talked about strategies to make oil-free automobiles.”

This video originally appeared on SmartPlanet with the headline “Amory Lovins: Carbon fiber cars would cut oil dependency.”

The Many Roles of a Tree – An Excerpt from Gaia’s Garden

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

The following is an excerpt from Gaia’s Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture by Toby Hemenway. It has been adapted for the Web.

As I’ve said, when we look at a plant, we often see it as doing one thing. Take the hypothetical white oak I referred to above. Some home owner placed that tree in the backyard to create a shady spot. But even this single tree, isolated in a lawn, is giving a rich performance, not simply acting as a leafy umbrella. Let’s watch this oak tree to see what it’s doing.

It’s dawn. The first rays of sunlight strike the canopy of the oak, but most of the energy in these beams is consumed in evaporating dew on the leaves. Only after the leaves are dry does the sunlight warm the air within the tree. Above the oak, however, the air has begun to heat, and a cloud of just-awakened insects swirls here. Below the canopy, it’s still too chilly for the bugs to venture out. They roil in a narrow band within the thin layer of warm air above the tree. Together the sun and the oak have created insect habitat, and with it, a place for birds, who quickly swoop to feast on the swarm of bugs.

In the cool shade of this tree, snow remains late into the spring, long after unprotected snow has melted. Soil near the tree stays moist, watering both the oak and nearby plantings and helping to keep a nearby creek flowing. (Early miners in the West frequently reported creeks disappearing once they’d cut nearby forests for mine timbers.)

Soon the sun warms the humid, night-chilled air within the tree. The entrapped air dries, its moisture escaping to the sky to help form clouds. This lost moisture is quickly replaced by the transpiring leaves, which pull water up from roots and exhale it through puffy-lipped pores in the leaves, called stomata. Groundwater, whether polluted or clean, is filtered by the tree and exits through the leaves as pure water. So trees are excellent water purifiers, and active ones. A full-grown tree can transpire 2,000 gallons of water on a hot, dry day. But this moisture doesn’t just go away—it soon returns as rain. Up to half of the rainfall over forested land comes from the trees themselves. (The rest arrives as evaporation from bodies of water.) Cut the trees, and downwind rain disappears.

Sun striking the leaves ignites the engines of photosynthesis, and from these green factories oxygen streams into the air. But more benefits exist. To build sugars and the other carbon-based molecules that provide fuel and structure for the tree, the leaves remove carbon dioxide from the air. This is how trees help reduce the level of greenhouse gases.

As the leaves absorb sunlight and warm the air within the tree, this hot, moist air rises and mixes with the drier, cool air above. Convection currents begin to churn, and morning breezes begin. So trees help create cooling winds above them.

Closer to the ground, trees block the wind and make excellent windbreaks. Wind streaming past a warm building can carry off a lot of heat, so one or more trees on a house’s windward side will substantially reduce heating bills.

The oak’s upper branches toss in the morning breeze, while down below the air is still. The tree has captured the energetic movement of the air and converted it into its own motion. Where does this energy go? Some scientists think that captured wind energy is converted into the woody tissue of the tree, helping to build tough but flexible cells.

The morning breeze carries dust from the plowed fields of nearby farmland, which collects on the oak leaves. A single tree may have ten to thirty acres of leaf surface, all able to draw dust and pollutants from the air. Air passing through the tree is thus purified—and humidified as well. As air passes through the tree, it picks up moisture exhaled from the leaves, a light burden of pollen grains, a fine mist of small molecules produced by the tree, some bacteria, and fungal spores.

Some of those spores have landed below the tree, spawning several species of fungus that grow symbiotically amid the roots, secreting nutrients and antibiotics that feed and protect the tree. A vole has tunneled into the soft earth beneath the tree in search of some of this fungus. Later this vole will leave manure pellets near other oaks, inoculating them with the beneficial fungus—that is, if the owl who regularly frequents this oak doesn’t snatch up the vole first.

This tree’s ancestors provided Native Americans with flour made from acorns, though most contemporary people wouldn’t consider this use. Now, blue jays and squirrels frolic in the oak, snatching acorns and hiding them around this and neighboring yards. Some of these acorns, forgotten, will sprout and grow into new trees. Meanwhile, the animals’ diggings and droppings improve the soil. Birds probe the bark for insects, and yet other birds and insects depend on the inconspicuous flowers for food.

Later in the day, clouds (half of them created by trees, remember) begin to build. Rain droplets readily form around the bacteria, pollen, and other microscopic debris lofted from the oak. These small particles provide the nucleation sites that raindrops need to form. Thus, trees act as cloud seeders to bring rain.

As the rain falls, the droplets smack against the oak leaves and spread out into a fine film, coating the entire tree (all ten to thirty acres of leaves, plus the branches and trunk) before much rain strikes the ground. This thin film begins to evaporate even as the rain falls, further delaying any through-fall. Mosses and lichens on this old oak soak up even more of the rain. We’ve all seen dry patches beneath trees after a rain: A mature tree can absorb over a quarter inch of rain before any reaches the earth, even more if the air is dry and the rain is light.

The leaves and branches act as a funnel, channeling much of the rain to the trunk and toward the root zone of the tree. Soil close to the trunk can receive two to ten times as much rain as that in open ground. And the tree’s shade slows evaporation, preserving this moisture.

As the rain continues, droplets leak off the leaves and splatter on the ground. Because this tree-drip has lost most of the energy it gathered during its fall from the clouds, little soil erodes beneath the tree. Leaf litter and roots also help hold the soil in place. Trees are supreme erosion-control systems.

The water falling from the leaves is very different from what fell from the sky. Its passage through the tree transmutes it into a rich soup, laden with the pollen, dust, bird and insect droppings, bacteria and fungi collected by the leaves, and many chemicals and nutrients secreted by the tree. This nutritious broth both nourishes the soil beneath the tree and inoculates the leaf litter and earth with soil-decomposing organisms. In this way, the tree collects and prepares its own fertilizer solution.

The rain eases toward sundown, and the sky clears. The upper leaves of the tree begin to chill as night falls, and cold air drains down from the canopy, cooling the trunk and soil. But this chill is countered by heat rising from the day-warmed earth, which warms the air under the tree. The leafy canopy holds this heat, preventing it from escaping to the night sky. So nighttime temperatures are warmer beneath the tree than in the open.

The leaves, however, radiate their heat to the sky and become quite cold, often much colder than the air. All these cold surfaces condense moisture from the air, and the resulting dew drips from the leaves and wets the ground, watering the tree and surrounding plants. Leaves can also gather moisture from fog: On foggy days the mist collects in such volume that droplets trickle steadily from the leaves. On arid but foggy coasts, tree-harvested precipitation can be triple the average rainfall. By harvesting dew and fog, trees can boost available moisture to far beyond what a rain gauge indicates.

As we gaze at this huge oak, remember that we’re barely seeing half of it. At least 50 percent of this tree’s mass is below the ground. The roots may extend tens of feet down, and horizontally can range far beyond the span of the tree’s branches. We’ve already learned how these roots loosen and aerate soil, build humus as they grow and die, etch minerals free from rocks with mild acid secretions, and with sugary exudates provide food for hundreds or even thousands of species of soil organisms that live with them.

Roots gather nutrients from deep in the ground, and the tree uses them to fashion leaves. When these leaves drop in the fall, the carbon and minerals collected from the immense volume of air and earth around the tree are concentrated into a thin layer of mulch. Thus, the tree has harvested a diffuse dusting of useful nutrients, once sprinkled into thousands of cubic yards of soil and air, and packed them into a rich, dense agglutination of topsoil. In this way, trees mine and concentrate the sparse ores that surround them to build fertility and wealth. This wealth is shared with many other species, which root and burrow, feed and build, all nourished by the tree’s gatherings.

But there is more: This tree’s roots have threaded toward those of nearby oak trees and fused with them. A tree’s roots, researchers have shown, can graft with those of its kind nearby, exchanging nutrients and even notifying each other of insect attack. Chemical signals released by an infested tree prompt its neighbors to secrete protective compounds that will repulse the soon-to-invade bugs. If an oak has grafted to its neighbors, does it remain an individual tree? Perhaps trees in a forest are more like branches from a single subterranean “tree” than a group of individuals. One of the largest organisms in the world is a forest of aspen trees that is in fact a single individual. Above ground, it looks like a grove of separate trees, but beneath the surface, they are all connected via their entwined roots. Each of these aspen trees is genetically identical.

The ways in which a single tree interacts with other species and its environment, then, are many. I’ve barely mentioned the swarms of insects that this oak supports: gall wasps and their hymenopteran relatives, beetles that tunnel into twigs and bark, and all manner of sucking and chewing bugs and their many insect predators. Then there are the birds that feed on these bugs. And we shouldn’t forget the myriad nearby plants that benefit from the rain and nutrients collected by this tree.

Through this tree, we glimpse the benefits of ecological thinking. Instead of viewing a tree simply as something that looks nice or provides a single offering such as apples or shade, we can begin to see how deeply connected a tree is to its surroundings, both living and inanimate. A tree is a dynamic element embedded in and reacting to an equally dynamic landscape. It transforms wind and sunlight into a variety of daily and seasonally changing microclimates, harvests nutrients, builds soil, pumps and purifies air and water, creates and concentrates rain, and shelters and feeds wildlife and microbes. Add to all this the better-known benefits for people: fruit or nuts, shade, climbing and other fun for kids, and the beauty of foliage, flowers, and form. We start to see how tightly enmeshed is a simple tree with all the other elements in a landscape. Now we can begin to imagine the richness of a landscape of many plant species, all interconnected by flows of energy and nutrients, nurturing and being nourished by the animals and microbes that flap and crawl and tunnel among them.

Each plant modifies its environment. These changes in turn support or inhibit what lies nearby, whether living or not. Recognizing that plants don’t stand alone can radically affect the way we place the features of our gardens.

The Fallacy Of Native Plants – Martin Crawford

Tuesday, April 10th, 2012

A common rallying cry of environmentalists these days is the danger of invasive species and the primacy of native ones. Especially in terms of the plant world, it’s easy to get a group of nature lovers worked up over an infestation of Japanese Knotweed or Garlic Mustard (one ingenious way to deal with the former is to eat it! And to help you we’ve got a fantastic new cookbook called Wild Flavors…more on that in future posts!).

But what makes a species native to a place? Is it the soil structure or nutrients? Is it the typical weather pattern of a place? Does it thrive because of a certain ecological community that supports it (other plants and animals that are interdependent)? And what happens when some or all of these factors change, causing that formerly native creature to feel quite out of place?

These and other questions lead many permaculturists to doubt the rationale of favoring so-called native species over non-native ones that can thrive in what may end up being completely new conditions. What with climate change and development altering habitats, it’s hard to insist that only certain beings can live in a place, as if it were an exclusive club you need a membership card to access.

Author Martin Crawford is one such native plant skeptic. Watch this video to learn more about why, and check out his lovely book, Creating a Forest Garden for inspiration as to planting your own lush Eden (native or not)!


The Fallacy Of Native Plants – Martin Crawford by 5minKnowledge

“What Cheese Reveals About Human History” — Paul Kindstedt on Vermont Public Radio and WCAX News

Monday, April 9th, 2012

Paul Kindstedt, author of Cheese and Culture: A History of Cheese and its place in Western Civilization, appeared on Vermont Public Radio and WCAX TV last week.

Have you ever wondered how we humans first came to understand the delicious wonder that is cheese? If so, this book is for you. In the radio and television clips below you’ll get a taste of Kindstedt’s encyclopedic cheese-knowledge, and the enthusiasm that makes this book so much fun to dive into.

VPR’s Vermont Edition

“The science of cheesemaking and the development of the western world are deeply intertwined in the new book by University of Vermont professor and food scientist Paul Kindstedt. “Cheese and Culture: A History of Cheese and its Place in Western Civilization” explores how environmental factors, early trade practices and changes in climate shaped shaped the practice and science of making cheese over 9,000 years, and how understanding cheese may illuminate gaps in our knowledge of human history. Paul Kindstedt joins us to explore the role of cheese in ancient to modern society, and why the current U.S. renaissance in artisan cheese is part of a historical continuum of cheese in western culture.”

Listen to the show.

WCAX News

BURLINGTON, Vt. - Whether they’re artisan cheeses or spray cheese in a can, the variety of milk curds you can buy at the supermarket are part of the 9,000-year-old history of cheesemaking.

Paul Kindstedt wrote a new book called Cheese and Culture. He appeared on The :30 to tell us about the history behind making cheese.”

Watch the show.

Dr. Seuss, Petrochemicals, and the War on Bugs

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

While movie-goers recently lined up to see the Disney-fication of The Lorax (replete with marketing tie-ins to dish soap and automobiles … hmm), we here at Chelsea Green were reminded of an unflattering side to that beloved children’s author Dr. Seuss — one you don’t read about very often.

Before I give you the dirt on Dr. Seuss’ dark side, I’ll be the first to say that Dr. Seuss has brought us some of the great allegorical books of the modern age — The Lorax, The Sneetches, The Butter Battle Book, Dr. Brown Can Moo, Can You? (OK, maybe not so much the last one) — and each of his tomes is dog-eared and readily recited in my household.

However, before Dr. Seuss emerged as one of the great children’s book authors he toiled away as a cartoonist under his given name — Ted Geisel. Geisel inked cartoons for some of the nation’s major chemical companies who were looking for ways to dump their wartime nasty concoctions on an unsuspecting US public.

Voila! Pesticides and other agro-chemicals were born.

Author and farmer Will Allen (of Cedar Circle Farm here in Vermont) wrote about the rise of chemical farming in his 2007 book, The War on Bugs.

As a result, we here at Chelsea Green are offering —for a limited time — a salient chapter from Will’s book as a free download. In this chapter, Allen delves into Geisel’s early cartooning work replete with pro-pesticide, pro-patriotic toons for the agrichemical industry. In particular, Geisel helped to make Flit — and the Flit gun — a household word in this “war on bugs.”

As Allen notes in his book, many believe the positive, pro-environmental themes of The Lorax stemmed from Geisel’s own attempt to scrub clean his early cartooning legacy that helped to introduce chemicals into the food supply and everyday life.

Allen notes, “Perhaps Dr. Seuss realized his earlier mistakes and indiscretions with Standard Oil’s Flit and tried to make amends with The Lorax. Geisel must have known that Flit’s cartoons and his World War II cartoons for DDT had an enormous impact on the public’s use of pesticides and acceptance of DDT.”

He must have known, right?

Unless.

PS: Will Allen is also pretty active right now in Vermont’s effort to pass legislation requiring food that contains GMOs to be labeled as such. Check out his AlterNet article detailing Monsanto’s threat to sue if the law is passed, and find out how you can help by chiming in on our Facebook page.

WaronBugs: Pesticides, Household Poisons, and Dr. Seuss

Managing Manure: How to Use Deep Litter in Your Chicken Coop

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Here are some tips on how to use the valuable resource of chicken manure by harnessing the birds’ natural scratching tendencies to make great compost. It helps keep them healthy too. This is just one of the many subjects covered by Harvey Ussery in his recent book The Small-Scale Poultry Flock. It’s full of great ideas on how to care for your flock in a holistic, beyond-organic way.

Article reposted from: Suburban Hobby Farmer

Maybe the very best idea from Harvey Ussery’s book The Small-Scale Poultry Flock is his strategy for using what he calls “deep litter” to manage manure in the chicken coop. Ussery’s coop doesn’t even have a hint of ammonia, yet he almost never cleans it out, and his chickens are healthier because he doesn’t.

As you can imagine, excessive ammonia from chicken manure can damage a chicken’s sense of smell and, of course, it can be unpleasant for humans, too. So Ussery essentially turns the chicken manure into compost right inside the chicken coop.

According to the author, composting inside the coop keeps his chickens healthy because the good compost microbes keep the bad microbes in check the same way they do in your garden. As a result, the chickens are less likely to develop infections. Also, chickens love to scratch and rummage through the litter, so they are entertained and happy. No one knows for sure, but I bet happy hens lay more eggs.

The key to deep litter

The key to his strategy is to start with 12 inches of high carbon bedding material to balance the high nitrogen manure. The litter must fluff up and not compact so that it contains enough air to feed the good microbes. Ussery usually uses oak leaves as bedding because he has a free source of the material, but straw or black and white newspaper stripes would be good alternatives. Anything that is carbon rich and will fluff up.

Just about anyone who is interested in making compost knows that there are three golden rules you need to follow to get a pile cooking. You must:

1. Maintain a carbon to nitrogen materials ratio of about 30 to one.
2. Keep the pile moist but not too wet (like a damp sponge that has been wrung out).
3. Supply air to the microbes to keep them cooking.

The same rules apply with the deep litter method of chicken manure management. It’s also probably better to have a coop with a dirt floor when using this method. A floor would slow down the microbes migration from the dirt to the litter. It also would prevent the compost from wicking up moisture from the ground. See my post on Making Compost Faster.

The main problem with this method is keeping the litter damp and not too wet. Chickens are messy drinkers. You’ll have to take precautions to keep the drinking water out of the litter, otherwise mold and pathogens are likely to grow, which would be unhealthy for chickens and people.

One of the pluses of this type of manure management is that the chickens will happily turn the compost as part of their normal activities. You can even get them more excited about digging in the litter by hiding a little food in it.

Add bedding before it smells

At the first sign of ammonia (or even a little before), Ussery adds more litter. This adjusts the carbon to nitrogen ratio, making the microbes happy and eliminating the smell. If you do it right, you should generate a little natural heat from the compost, which the birds will appreciate in the winter.

Using this method, Ussery only has to clean out his coop when he needs compost. This takes some of the work out of raising chickens. Sounds like a good idea to me.

What do you think of this strategy? Does Harvey Ussery have the right idea or are there better methods? Let us know by commenting below.

Join the Conversation: ‘Like’ us on Facebook!

Wednesday, April 4th, 2012

It’s nice to be liked.

“Like” us on Facebook and learn more about the politics and practice of sustainable living. Facebook has recently switched to a new format called Timeline, which allows us to celebrate a lifetime of accomplishments, all in one place. As we fill it in you’ll be able to see photos, awards we’ve won, press, bestsellers, and other milestones in our history.  We hope you will take a look! 

Chelsea Green’s Facebook Page consolidates our news and blog postings, special offers, video, author articles, events, and more. It’s easy to share articles you enjoy with your friends, chime in on compelling conversation, and generally be a part of our community. Please become a fan of our page on Facebook, and please tell your friends and family about it, too!

 

Twenty-seven years ago, we started Chelsea Green with the conviction that growing your own food is inherently political. Today, we’re the leading publisher of books on the politics and practice of sustainable living.


We are also determined to keep Chelsea Green independent and create a business model that reflects our commitment to sustainability, which means leading the industry in terms of environmental practices, such as using recycled paper in every book, and keeping our shipping at a minimum to avoid books criss-crossing the country (or world) multiple times.


At the end of the day, Chelsea Green’s mission is to nurture the crucial voices of those speaking up against the ever-widening disparities of wealth, the collapse of rural economies, the hegemony of industrial agriculture, the buildup of toxins in the environment, and other accumulating costs of an ever-accelerating, ever-expanding economy based on material wealth.


That’s why we founded this company, and why we need your help to build the world we want to live in.

So don’t forget to become a fan of our page on Facebook. Whether it is a special on one of our books or a whole section of books, an article by one of our authors, a new videointeresting article, new photos or events that you might care about, you’ll be connected to this and much more on our Facebook page. It’s a great way to ask questions and share your thoughts and ideas. We want to hear from you! 

 

Always know that we like you right back. 

 

The folks at Chelsea Green Publishing

 

P.S. – We are on Twitter too.  And make sure to check out the list of books on sale: http://www.chelseagreen.com/bookstore/sale/

Springtime Is the Right Time for Dilly Beans

Wednesday, April 4th, 2012

If you’re in a northern clime you may not be quite ready to pickle your fresh legumes yet, but here’s a recipe from Wild Fermentation for whenever that first bountiful harvest rolls around. 

The following is an excerpt from Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods by Sandor Katz. It has been adapted for the Web.

Dilly Beans

Pickling food in vinegar is not a fermentation process. In brine pickling, vegetables are preserved by lactic acid, which is produced by the action of microorganisms on the vegetables. Vinegar pickling makes use of a fermented product, vinegar, but the acidity of the vinegar prevents microorganism action. Vinegar pickles contain no live cultures. According to Keeping Food Fresh, a book by Terre Vivante, a French eco-education center focused on organic gardening and preservation of Old World food-preservation techniques, “Pickles were always lacto-fermented in times past, and then transferred to vinegar solely to stabilize them for commercial purposes.” Indeed, the great advantage that vinegar pickling has over lacto-fermentation pickling is that vinegar pickles will last forever (well, almost), while brined pickles will last for weeks or months, but rarely for years, and definitely not forever. Cookbooks are full of vinegar pickling recipes, so I will offer just one: the dilly beans my father makes from his garden every summer and serves to his family and friends all year long.

TIMEFRAME: 6 weeks

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT:

  • Sealable canning jars: 1 1⁄2 pint/750 milliliter size is best, as its height perfectly accommodates the length of string beans

INGREDIENTS:

  • String beans
  • Garlic
  • Salt (my dad swears by coarse kosher salt, but sea salt is fine, too)
  • Whole dried chili peppers
  • Celery seed
  • Fresh dill (flowering tops best, or leaves)
  • White distilled vinegar
  • Water

PROCESS:

  1. Guesstimate how many jars you’ll fill with the string beans you have. Thoroughly clean jars and line them up.
  2. Into each jar, place 1 clove of garlic, 1 teaspoon (5 milliliters) of salt, 1 whole red chili pepper, 1/4 teaspoon (1.5 milliliters) of celery seed, and a flowering dill top or small bunch of dill leaves. Then fill the jar with beans standing on end, stuffing them as tightly as you can into the jar.
  3. For each jar you have filled, measure 1 cup (250 milliliters) of vinegar and 1 cup (250 milliliters) of water. Boil the vinegar-water mixture, then pour it into the jars over the beans and spices, to ½ inch (1 centimeter) from the top of the jar.
  4. Seal the jars and place them in a large pot of boiling water for a 10-minute heat processing.

Leave the dilly beans for at least 6 weeks for the flavors to meld, then open jars as desired and enjoy. My father serves these dilly beans as an hors d’oeuvre. Heat-processed pickles can be stored for years without refrigeration.

Photo courtesy syddesigns’ photostream on Flickr.

Three Chelsea Green Titles are Finalists for Foreword Reviews Book of the Year Awards!

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

The editors of ForeWord Reviews are thrilled to present the following titles as award finalists.

ForeWord‘s Book of the Year Awards program was designed for booksellers and librarians to share in the process of discovering distinctive books across a number of genres with judgments based on their own authority and on patron interests. After months of winnowing down the award finalists’ list, the editors at ForeWord are confident in their selections, and our judges agree, saying this year’s titles are the best they’ve seen!

Join us as we formally announce the 2011 Gold, Silver, and Bronze Award Winners, as well as the Editor’s Choice Prizes for Fiction and Nonfiction at this year’s American Library Association conference in Anaheim, CA on June 23.

View the entire list of 2011 Book of the Year Awards Finalists

Congratulations authors!

Strengthening Local Economies: Michael Shuman on Investing in Small Businesses

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

Earlier this month Michael Shuman participated in a web event with Orion magazine, and explained the massive shift toward local investment that he outlines in his new book Local Dollars, Local Sense.

If you missed it, you can still listen to the whole thing on Orion‘s website, or on the newly launched Resilience.org, run by the Post Carbon Institute. Local Dollars, Local Sense is the first book in the Community Resilience Guide series, a joint effort of PCI and Chelsea Green, so stay tuned for the next books in the series!

Web Event Summary: Not even 1 percent of Americans’ long-term savings are invested locally, largely because it’s just not possible under the current system. But what would our towns look like if a larger fraction of this $30 trillion were in local economies? Local businesses account for half of the jobs and economic output in the U.S., so the effect could be important. During Orion‘s latest live web event, Michael Shuman, author of the new book Local Dollars, Local Sense, discussed innovative ways that citizens can improve their local economies while growing their own bank accounts.

Right click to download


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