Archive for February, 2012


Get to Work With Our Weekend Project Special!

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

Looking for something to do? We have some of our favorite ‘how to’ projects — building a cold frame, growing mushrooms in your home, making your fridge carbon-free, or cooking kale and apples — ready for reading and viewing on our website.

We hope these projects will inspire you as they have thousands of others. And, as an added bonus we’re passing along a special discount to our online community – 25% off your next purchase at our online bookstore. At Checkout, just enter the code DIY25 and your discount will be immediately applied.

Happy reading from the folks at Chelsea Green Publishing.

P.S. Discount codes can’t be applied with any other offer. And, remember, orders over $100 receive free shipping.

Get a Jump on the Planting Season: Build Your Own Cold Frame

Winter Harvest Handbook Book Cover Image

Get a jump on your spring garden by taking advantage of Eliot Coleman’s innovative strategies for successful growing in cold weather. Eliot’s book, The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year-Round Vegetable Production Using Deep Organic Techniques and Unheated Greenhouses, will show you everything you need to grow your own clean organic produce all year long.

Building on the techniques that hundreds of thousands of farmers and gardeners adopted from The New Organic Grower and Four-Season Harvest, The Winter Harvest Handbook, focuses on growing produce of unparalleled freshness and quality in customized, unheatedor minimally heated, moveable plastic greenhouses.

READ MORE…

HOW TO: Grow Shiitake Mushrooms in a Garage or Yard

Mushroom Image

Some of the most expensive and delicious gourmet mushrooms on the market are shiitakes, which also are credited in Asia with healthful properties such as lowering cholesterol and improving immunity to cancer. They are simple to grow in logs and take about 6 to 18 months to emerge. R. J. Ruppenthal, author of Fresh Food from Small Spaces: The Square-Inch Gardener’s Guide to Year-Round Growing, Fermenting, and Sprouting, explains how.

READ MORE…


DIY Project: Build Your Own Carbon-Free Fridge

Carbon-Free Fridge Image

Refrigerators are one of the largest energy consumers in your home. There are great steps you could take to reduce the energy consumption of your fridge, buy why not take advantage of the dropping (or already low) temperatures outside to build your own carbon-free refrigerator?

Stephen and Rebekah Hren, authors of The Carbon-Free Home: 36 Remodeling Projects to Help Kick the Fossil-Fuel Habit, will show you how.

READ MORE…


HOW TO MAKE: Sautéed Kale with Apples, Feta and Walnuts

Wild Flavors Book Cover Image

Kale, a cousin of wild cabbage, is a wonder veggie. We love it for its nutrient saturation, that it is available all year, and it grows sweeter in the winter. Cookbook author Didi Emmons gives us another reason to sing our kale praises with a warm, hearty salad from her book Wild Flavors. Brimming with apples, raisins, feta and toasted walnuts, this salad can be served as a side or enjoyed as a healthy main course.

Wild Flavors follows a year at Eva’s Garden through the seasons. It showcases Emmons’s creative talents, featuring herbs (African basil, calaminth, lovage) and wild foods (autumn olives, wild roses, Japanese knotweed). The wide-ranging recipes reflect the shifting seasonal harvest and are easy to follow, but best of all, Emmons shows us how these herbs, greens, and wild foods improve and transform the flavors in our food.
Wild Flavors is a cookbook that celebrates the interconnectedness and beauty of nature, farms, animals, and ourselves.

READ MORE…


Five Ways: To Cut Carbon While Cooking

cooking Image

There are many ways to decrease your carbon footprint by changing WHAT you cook for dinner: eat less meat, use local vegetables, grow your own, etc. But there are also many ways to decrease your carbon footprint by changing HOW you cook your dinner.

Jon Clift and Amanda Cuthbert, authors of Energy: Use Less-Save More, devote an entire section of their book to reducing energy usage in the kitchen. Here are some of their suggestions.

READ MORE…


Four Things: To Know About Buying Cheese

 

 

Gordon Edgar, author of Cheesemonger: A Life on the Wedge, tells you the four things you need to know about buying cheese.Witty and irreverent, informative and provocative, Cheesemonger is the highly readable story of Gordon Edgar’s unlikely career as a cheesemonger at San Francisco’s worker-owned Rainbow Grocery Cooperative.

A former punk-rock political activist, Edgar bluffed his way into his cheese job knowing almost nothing, but quickly discovered a whole world of amazing artisan cheeses. There he developed a deep understanding and respect for the styles, producers, animals, and techniques that go into making great cheese.

WATCH IT NOW…


Video: Reclaiming Fermentation and the Foods We Eat

Coming Soon!

Available for Pre-Order

Art of Fermentation Book Cover Image

The Art of Fermentation is the most comprehensive guide to do-it-yourself home fermentation ever published. Sandor Katz presents the concepts and processes behind fermentation in ways that are simple enough to guide a reader through their first experience making sauerkraut or yogurt, and in-depth enough to provide greater understanding and insight for experienced practitioners.

While Katz expertly contextualizes fermentation in terms of biological and cultural evolution, health and nutrition, and even economics, this is primarily a compendium of practival information—how the processes work;parameters for safety; techniques for effective preservation; troubleshooting; and more.


“Sauerkraut was definitely my gateway drug into fermentation.” — Sandor Katz

WATCH IT NOW…

Plantain: Excerpt from Chinese Medicinal Herb Farm in Herb Companion

Chinese Medicinal Herb Farm Book Cover Image

Peg Schafer, longtime grower and teacher, guides readers with information on propagating, cultivating, and harvesting Chinese herbs, and presents fascinating new scientific data that reveal the age-old wisdom of nature and the traditional systems of Chinese medicine. Some common plants like Plantain have a large range of medincianal uses. Take a look at this excerpt to get the low down.

READ MORE…

In their newest issue Herb Companion magazine writes about the recent tour of Peg’s herb farm (and includes an excerpt). It sounds like they had a wonderful visit:

Schafer’s greeting is as warm as the weather, but as soon as we enter the growing area, it’s obvious this is a place where business—a lot of business—gets done. Tools are everywhere, along with organized piles of herbs and the hum of a dehydrator that forms a steady accompaniment to conversation in Schafer’s office. When we head out to the trial garden and fields, it’s like visiting a friendly but somewhat alien land. There are mimosa and honeysuckle—recognizable, but who knew they were medicinal? And at last I get to see Withania somnifera, also known as ashwagandha, growing. It isn’t pretty, but it’s one of my favorite herbs, a great tonic herb that
nourishes just about every system in the body.

READ MORE…

New Videos from Chef Didi Emmons

Monday, February 6th, 2012

Didi Emmons, chef and author of Wild Flavors: One Chef’s Transformative Year Cooking from Eva’s Farm shows you how to prepare two healthy and scrumptious dishes in these new videos from How2Heroes!

How2Heroes is a how-to online video destination that celebrates people’s passion for food – the flavors, the presentation, the secrets to success, the cultural inspirations, and of course the “heroes” who share their knowledge and experience.

Didi’s passion for wildly innovative and radically fresh flavors really shines in these videos, as it does in the book Wild Flavors.

Bon appetit!

 

Now Available: Local Dollars, Local Sense!

Friday, February 3rd, 2012

“Michael Shuman answers a lot of questions I’ve always wondered about, and in the process paints a practical vision of exactly where we need to be headed in this country. Consider this book an excellent investment!”
Bill McKibben, author of Eaarth and The End of Nature

We’re very excited to announce that Local Dollars, Local Sense: How to Shift Your Money from Wall Street to Main Street and Achieve Real Prosperity by Michael Shuman is now available!

Were you all riled up by the Occupy uprising (which is still percolating in small camps across the country, by the way), but left staring at your IRA or 401(k) thinking, darn, I’m still invested in stupid old Wall Street, what can I do?! Well, first of all, you’re lucky to have such problems. And second of all, we commend you for feeling the need to solve them! You shouldn’t have to invest against your values just to protect your nest egg.

This new book can help you figure out how to invest more sustainably — not in corrupt corporations that are governed shadily themselves and that try to corrupt the government — but in real, local ventures in your very own community.

“Local small businesses employ more people and respond to community needs better than big corporations do—but nearly all our investment dollars support Wall Street banks and huge companies. The path to local investing has been strewn with obstacles. Michael Shuman clears a path for us all, showing how local investing can help solve some of America’s biggest social, economic, environmental, and political problems. This is a book many of us have been waiting for.”


Richard Heinberg, author of The End of Growth and Peak Everything

Check it out today!

Is a Major Solar Storm Possible? An Interview with Mat Stein.

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

Author Mat Stein joins FTMWeekly Radio to discuss his latest book, When Disaster Strikes: A Comprehensive Guide for Emergency Planning and Crisis Survival. Mat shares disaster survival skills and his insights into why emergency planning should be a vital component of your family’s overall gameplan. The show specifically discusses the disaster potential of a major solar storm or an EMP (electromagnetic pulse).

Mat Stein is also the author of When Technology Fails: A Manual for Self-Reliance, Sustainability, and Surviving the Long Emergency.

Basically, he’s your go-to guy when it comes to disaster and survival planning. Enjoy this interview, then check out his videos and blog to learn more.

Chinese Medicinal Herbs in a Down-Home Garden — From Herb Companion Magazine

Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

In their February/March 2012 issue, Herb Companion magazine is printing an excerpt from Peg Schafer’s new book, The Chinese Medicinal Herb Farm. It’s available to read on their website now.

Here’s what some growers and herbalists have to say about this exciting new book:

“Peg Schafer is the best artisanal grower I know. For this book, she has distilled the knowledge of the small group who, over the past two decades, has pioneered North American production of Chinese medicinal herbs, and tested it through direct experience. This book clearly explains the whys as well as the how-tos, and delivers information into the eager hands of all perennial polyculturalists who will grow us a post-peak oil healthcare system; it is a gift to us all.”  —Jean Giblette, owner, High Falls Gardens and co-founder, LocalHerbs.org

“Peg Schafer understands in more ways than one that good health springs from the land. Herbs from the Chinese tradition perfectly complement more familiar healing plants. The concept of ‘regional medicine farms’ resonates so well with the growing desire to eat more locally. But of course! We are what we eat, and that includes the medicinal plants that work with our bodies to create wholeness. Every plant person will instantly recognize the gift waiting within this book—Schafer shares many astute observations of how each plant garners medicinal oomph, what she calls the vital qi (chi) of each herb. And that’s the right sort of inspiration to launch any thinking gardener!” —Michael Phillips, author of The Holistic Orchard, and co-author Nancy Phillips of The Herbalist’s Way

It sounds like K. C. Compton of Herb Companion magazine had a wonderful visit to Schafer’s herb farm.

Schafer’s greeting is as warm as the weather, but as soon as we enter the growing area, it’s obvious this is a place where business—a lot of business—gets done. Tools are everywhere, along with organized piles of herbs and the hum of a dehydrator that forms a steady accompaniment to conversation in Schafer’s office. When we head out to the trial garden and fields, it’s like visiting a friendly but somewhat alien land. There are mimosa and honeysuckle—recognizable, but who knew they were medicinal? And at last I get to see Withania somnifera, also known as ashwagandha, growing. It isn’t pretty, but it’s one of my favorite herbs, a great tonic herb that nourishes just about every system in the body. See it in the Image Gallery.

Schafer says she started her business because she saw a need for the Chinese medicinal herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to be grown and harvested safely, sustainably and with integrity—an approach that’s by no means a given in today’s market. She’s written her newly released book, The Chinese Medicinal Herb Farm: A Cultivator’s Guide to Small-Scale Organic Herb Production because she is a woman on a mission: She wants to encourage more people to follow in her footsteps, for the sake of health and ecology, and also to strengthen and diversify the growing stock of these remarkable plants. The following excerpt is for any of our readers who want to expand their herbal businesses or just grow a few healing herbs in their gardens.

Read more: http://www.herbcompanion.com/grow/gardening/chinese-medicinal-herbs-zm0z12fmzdeb.aspx#ixzz1kvD6Id00


Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com