Archive for September, 2011


Enter for a Chance to Win Eight Chelsea Green Books–A Partnership with Mother Earth News

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

We’ve teamed up with one of our favorite publications, Mother Earth News, to offer a fantastic prize to one lucky reader. Sign up today and you’ll get a chance to win these eight fabulous books from Chelsea Green!

Gathering by Diane Ott Whealy. This heartwarming story captures what is best in the American spirit: the ability to dream and, through hard work and perseverance, inspire others to contribute their efforts to a cause.

The Farmstead Creamery Advisor by Gianaclis Caldwell. The complete guide to building and running a small, farm-based cheese business.

Growing, Older by Joan Dye Gussow. Considered both a teacher and muse by countless people who vie for a food revolution, Joan Dye Gussow here offers a personal chronicle of death, life and vegetables.

The Sheer Ecstasy of Being a Lunatic Farmer by Joel Salatin. With visceral stories and humor from his half-century as a “lunatic” farmer, Joel Salatin contrasts the differences between the farming and food systems endorsed by foodies and environmentally minded folks versus the systems promoted by Monsanto and friends.

The Small-Scale Poultry Flock by Harvey Ussery. An all-natural approach to raising chicken and other fowl for home and market growers.

The Solar House by Daniel D. Chiras. Passive solar heating and passive cooling — approaches known as natural conditioning — provide comfort throughout the year by reducing, or eliminating, the need for fossil fuel.

Up Tunket Road by Philip Ackerman-Leist. The education of a modern homesteader.

When Technology Fails by Matthew Stein. A manual for self-reliance, sustainability and surviving the long emergency.

Sign up HERE for your chance to win.

Click here for a complete list of terms and conditions.

Now Available: It’s Probably Nothing: More Adventures of a Vermont Country Doctor

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

“Dr. Beach Conger’s It’s Probably Nothing is the inspiring tale of a fine and caring physician’s life and times in two places that could scarcely be more different: rural Vermont and inner-city Philadelphia. Written with great humor, wisdom, common sense, and compassion, It’s Probably Nothing is a uniquely American memoir by a very insightful American individualist. I loved it.”—Howard Frank Mosher, author of Walking to Gatlinburg

By the author of Bag Balm and Duct Tape.

Now available in our bookstore, It’s Probably Nothing continues the tale woven by Dr. Beach Conger in his first book, Bag Balm and Duct Tape. This new collection sees Conger and his wife yearning for new challenges and relocating to the suburbs of Philadelphia after 25 years in mythical Dumster, Vermont. Conger gamely takes a job in a teaching hospital in the poorest part of the city and gets to experience urban bureaucratized medicine and its trials—a far cry from the more idiosyncratic and hands-on version he practiced in Vermont. After 5 years Conger and his wife move back to Dumster, where he rediscovers more about his patients’ capacity to both cope and cherish one another than he expected.

Each of the tightly constructed chapters is centered around a particular patient or particular theme in medicine. It’s Probably Nothing is both funny and poignant, and showcases both Conger’s irreverent view into medicine and his profound empathy for the characters he encounters along the way. His experience highlights how medicine—and problems with our current medical system—can remain the same and yet be vastly different across class, race, and region. Among the people the reader meets are small-town farmers and other heroes, Vermont celebrities, and the occasional reclusive author.

About the Author

Beach Conger, M.D.

Beach Conger, MD, was born in 1941 in New York City and grew up in Pleasantville, N.Y. He graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1967 and did his training in internal medicine at Boston City Hospital and the University of California San Francisco. From 1969 to 1971 he was an offer in the Epidemic Intelligence Service at the CDC. From 1977 to 2001, he practiced general internal medicine at Mt. Ascutney Hospital in Windsor, Vt. He then spent five years teaching hospital medicine at Medical College of Pennsylvania and Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, serving as chief of hospital medicine at Medical College of Pennsylvania and Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, serving as chief of hospital medicine at the latter. In 2006 he returned to Vermont to practice in Windsor. He is a member of the Dartmouth Medical School faculty, where he precepts medical students in their primary care rotations.


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