Archive for May, 2009


Reign of Terroir: Richard Seireeni Talks Sustainable Wine

Thursday, May 28th, 2009

Last week, Reign of Terroir reviewed Richard Seireeni‘s Gort Cloud: The Invisible Force Powering Today’s Most Visible Green Brands. And they liked it so much, they asked him for an interview.

Here, Richard talks about his healthy taste for local—and not so local—wines, and shares a little marketing savvy the “greener” wineries can use to get themselves out there (because there are vintners that care about their carbon footprint and sustainable agricultural practices—you’ve just never heard of them).

From Reign of Terroir:

Admin Do you yourself drink wine?
 
Richard Seireeni Yes. More than the doctor recommends, I’m afraid.
 
How do you select a wine?
 

RS It is mostly driven by availability and price. I’ll buy what “looks” interesting at Whole Foods, Trader Joes and the local Canyon grocery store. My real passion is Italian wines, so I’ll occasionally go out of my way to find nice Italian reds at a wine shop. But I’m always shocked at the difference I pay for the same bottle in Italy compared to California. And at the end of the day, I have to remind myself that eco means local. For me, that would be wines grown in Santa Barbara.
 
As (perhaps) a casual observer of wine advertisements, labels, engaging in conversations with wine-drinking friends, how well do you think the industry does to promote the ‘green’ aspects their product?
 
RS Not very well. Of course, there is organic wine, which has a poor reputation for taste. I hear its improving. I don’t seek out organic, but I suppose I should. On all other levels, I hear almost nothing about sustainable farming, manufacturing and distribution in the wine industry. A couple months ago, while researching the subject, I did come across a vineyard in California that trying to be as sustainable as possible. It seems like a relatively unique story. I am aware of the eco-advantage to plastic corks and non-glass bottles, but this is mostly under the radar.
 
Winegrowers are notoriously conservative with many quality producers spending hours in the vineyard worrying over endless practical things. Let’s start with the small producer. Of course, they have drive and ambition. They would not otherwise be in such a demanding business! How might they be persuaded to engage new media?
 
RS The driver of preference for most organic foods has been the health and taste advantages plus finding these things at local Farmers Markets where you meet the producer. No so for wine. The health and taste issues are not well publicized for organic wine. Nor do I see a lot being made out of sustainable vineyard practices. That said, we don’t tend to associate wine growing with giant polluting agra business. The perception (whether or not it is true) is that it’s mostly family vineyards and small-scale production. In other words, I don’t think the average consumer is aware of an environmental impact in his or her choice of wine. It’s just not front of mind, like it is when choosing a new car for instance.

 
Many wineries have accomplished great things with respect to environmental enhancements and the improvement in working conditions. But they cannot always use them as selling points. The consumer often pays little attention and popular wine trade mags do not often put the environment or social issues front and center. What might be a winegrower’s first steps to engaging elements of the Gort Cloud, to do what programmers refer to as a ‘work-around’?
 
RS Well, I assume that some wine growers are trying to grow sustainably, but it’s important to realize that “green” is almost never the driver of preference for any product, green or otherwise. It’s almost always something else with green providing halo-effect. That said, producers looking to get maximum price for their products can use gort cloud connections to garner premium pricing. For instance, an eco-conscious winery might reach out to eco-conscious restaurants, grocery chains and food distribution firms within the gort cloud to build premium distribution.
 
One can engage the Gort Cloud, new media generally, with very little up-front money. Still, budgets are tight. Yet with the wine market filled with a staggering number of choices, the incentive for a producer to draw a distinction is there. Who might the winegrower, especially the smaller one, turn to for basic assistance with new media? Of course, your book would certainly be on my short list!
 
RS My first suggestion would be to follow the slow food and organic food and sustainably-sourced food groups, which are an aspect of the gort cloud. I’d reach out to the bloggers and trendspotters in these groups for support and echo-effect.
 

Consumers tend to think that wine is already a natural product, that no further thought needs be given it. Of course, it is not true. Environmental degradation, as with any other agricultural product, it is a part of the price of conventional grape growing. Sustainable methods, Organic and biodynamic approaches, by contrast, are very different. How might their respective certifying agencies, who tend to follow more traditional messaging avenues, better get the word out?
 
RS Yes, then you have the use of sulfites, which is an historical part of the winemaking process. Nevertheless, there are sustainable farming support and certifying groups that can lend some third party legitimacy to a grower’s claims.

Read the whole interview here.

LISTEN: Survival Expert Mat Stein Is “Beyond the Ordinary”

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

Can we reverse trends that author Matthew Stein calls “civilization busters”? There’s plenty of evidence that a gloom and doom attitude is sensible—even conservative. But Mat points to how quickly and nimbly the world turned itself around on the threat of CFCs to the ozone layer. We saved ourselves before, and with a concerted global effort, we may be able to do it again. And we may have to—over and over and over again.

To be sure, we face numerous challenges on multiple fronts: overfishing, overpopulation, forest-clearing, carbon in the atmosphere, peak oil, climate change, nuclear proliferation….

In this set of audio podcasts, Matthew Stein talks to Beyond the Ordinary about the problems, his proposed solutions, and how his book, When Technology Fails: A Manual for Self-Reliance, Sustainability, and Surviving the Long Emergency, fits in.

Listen Now

Chido’s Blend

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

Turning coffee pulp into mushrooms, creating livelihoods for young women that otherwise wouldn’t have a chance? That’s what I call good coffee.

Chido Govero, author of The Future of Hope, took her tragic and compelling personal story and turned it into a tool to help other young women in otherwise hopeless situations.

Dear Friends,

In spite of neglect and hardships … look what we succeeded in doing! The project of converting pulp to protein started in 1995 and now we are taking this to new levels of empowerment.

Thanks to the creative ideas of ST Chang from Hong Kong, and the hard labor on the science by Carmenza Jaramillo in Colombia, we are now entering a new phase.

The export of coffee from Zimbabwe, after years of boycotts and problems is now made possible thanks to the initiatives of Chido, our orphan girl who learned how to convert biomass waste into edible mushrooms using local biodiversity. Each farmer in Zimbabwe who is part of the new coffee blend has to commit to organize training for girls at risk, using the waste from the coffee farm.

This means that the export of a cash crop is providing food security, and when the girls have food security, the abuse of young girls and women is gone. Would you please have a look at this website: get coffee, get Chido’s book (for free) and let us celebrate the first container of coffee leaving Zimbabwe generating jobs!

http://www.equatorcoffees.com/store/pages.php?pageid=39

If you like coffee … this is a great way forward.

Thank you.

gunter

Check out the Equator Coffees website to learn more:

You can make a difference. With every order* of Chido’s Blend you will receive a complimentary copy of Chido’s book (a $9.99 value). And by purchasing Chido’s Blend you are supporting the farmers that supply the coffee pulp to Chido’s girls.

WATCH: Grassroots Campaign Cleans Up Estonia in One Day

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

Up until last year, the tiny country of Estonia’s natural beauty was marred by tens of thousands of tons of household and construction waste littering their forests, meadows, and streams. It was a big problem.

A grassroots campaign of 50,000 volunteers cleaned up 10,000 tons of trash—in less than a day.

This video tells the inspiring story of how a small group turned one man’s dream into a national movement, endorsed by celebrities and politicians, and coordinated through high-tech twenty-first century technology. The campaign was called “Let’s Do It!” and it’s pretty inspirational stuff.

Discovering Amari: Saveur Interviews Deirdre Heekin and Caleb Barber

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

On one of their trips to Italy a few years ago, Caleb Barber (In Late Winter We Ate Pears: A Year of Hunger and Love) and Deirdre Heekin (Libation: A Bitter Alchemy, In Late Winter We Ate Pears: A Year of Hunger and Love), proprietors of Vermont restaurant Osteria Pane e Salute, discovered a love for a peculiar Italian wine: the strong, bitter digestive amaro. It seems, in those little Italian towns, everyone and their mother had a side business in home-brewed amari!

Saveur’s Leah Koenig interviewed Caleb and Deirdre to find out how they managed to bring the flavors—and the feeling—of Italy back with them to their Vermont eatery.

When it came time for Caleb Barber and Deirdre Heekin, owners of the Vermont restaurant Osteria Pane e Salute, to return from their Italian vacation a few years ago, they found themselves cramming nearly 20 bottles of amaro, a strong, bitter digestive, into their bags. The couple had long been fans of Italy’s food and wine, but their amaro discovery raised their level of infatuation. Now, Heekin has even written a book, Libation: A Bitter Alchemy (Chelsea Green, May 2009), about their attempts to create Italian-inspired wine and liqueurs in their northern New England home. Recently, SAVEUR spoke with the pair about amari (naturally) and the challenges that come with transplanting old-world ways to Vermont.

You first tried amaro while visiting Italy’s Basilicata region. What did you like about it?

Deidre: We were at a wonderful restaurant in Matera, and after dinner the waiter asked, “Do you want coffee or amaro?” Then he asked whether we wanted the national brand, Fernet-Branca, or Padre Peppe. When we hesitated, he raised his finger, gave us a knowing look, and said, “I’ll be back!” So there was all this mystery around it from the beginning. When I finally took a sip, I was struck not only by its great flavor but also by the way it feels as if it were it’s traveling down your windpipe and expanding your chest. You feel like you’re going through some sort of conversion.

Caleb: We started asking questions and found that Padre Peppe comes from the local monks, who use green walnuts as a base. Everywhere we went on that trip, we asked about amari.

D: We also learned that Padre Peppe is available only locally, which is true of many amari. Many people still make it at home.

C: At one restaurant in Puglia, when we asked about Padre Peppe, the waiter said, “Oh, we don’t have that, but my mother makes an amaro called Cente’erbe [100 herbs]. Meet me tomorrow, and I’ll give you a bottle.” Soon, the entire trip became defined by our meeting people in coffee bars to let us sample a new amaro.

Does the younger generation make amaro too, or is it more an old-fashioned practice?

C: Recently, there’s been renewed interest among younger Italians. The economy has been weak for several years, and people are looking to local food traditions to generate new activity.

Read the whole article here.

 

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Weed Control and Crop Rotation: Managing Your Small-Scale Grain

Tuesday, May 26th, 2009

The following is an excerpt from Small-Scale Grain Raising: An Organic Guide to Growing, Processing, and Using Nutritious Whole Grains for Home Gardeners and Local Farmers by Gene Logsdon. It has been adapted for the Web.

The worst problem in raising wheat organically is weed control. Because wheat is customarily planted “solid” rather than in rows, you can’t easily weed it, so without very good management, you can get too many weeds. Chemical farmers spray herbicides, which control most weeds in wheat fairly easily, except for a few new exotic weeds that appear to be immune.

Rotations help to avoid some weeds. In organic farming the crop before wheat should always be a row crop that has been cultivated intensively for weed control. That way you at least start off ahead of the weeds. Then, where wheat is sown in the fall after most weeds quit growing, the crop gets a good jump on weeds, makes a good stand, and is off and growing in the spring, choking out some of the weeds that try to come up later.

But don’t plant solid-stand wheat in a field that has been full of weeds the preceding year unless you use herbicides. If you are organic and growing only a small plot, it’s better to plant your wheat in rows and cultivate it like the Chinese do. American farmers may laugh at you, but the Chinese have forgotten more about raising food than we yet know.

In your rotation of crops, either in the field or in the garden, wheat is a good crop in which to plant clover for nitrogen fixation and as a green manure. The wheat in the spring is growing on a fairly well-cultivated soil surface. The clover seed falls on rather bare land, even though the wheat is growing there, and will sprout and grow readily. The wheat then acts as a “nurse” crop for the legume, which comes on to heavy growth after the wheat is harvested.

Since corn should be the first crop to follow the clover, the basis of your organic-grain rotation will be either wheat, clover, field corn, and back to wheat, or wheat, clover, sweet corn, back to wheat. Since it is good to follow corn with another nitrogen-fixing legume, soybeans, peas, snap beans, or lima beans are fine, making a rotation of wheat, clover, corn, beans, and back to wheat. Potatoes, wheat, clover, back to potatoes is an excellent rotation where potatoes are a main crop. A five-year garden rotation could be: wheat, clover, sweet corn, peas, and beans double-cropped to fall vegetables, tomatoes, then back to wheat. But almost any variation will work well if you maintain the basic wheat-legume-corn rotation and don’t follow two vegetables of the same kind or family in successive years.

Robert Kuttner: Saving the Economy—and President Obama—from “Centrism”

Tuesday, May 26th, 2009

One hundred days and some change (pun intended) into Barack Obama’s presidency, the once-nominee has proven his centrist rhetoric on the campaign trail wasn’t just a bunch of hot air. He’s shown himself to be deeply principled and honest—for better or worse.

Those of us hoping his selection of Robert Rubin protégés Tim Geithner and Larry Summers was just a smokescreen to ease the fears of Wall Street, centrist Democrats, and the Right have been a bit disappointed that the President is hewing pretty close to his not-really-that-far-left-of-center platform. But desperate times call for drastic measures.

If we want to pull the Executive Branch further to the Left and save the economy with some FDR-size reforms, We the Frightened and Angry People will have to coalesce into a disciplined movement comparable to those far-flung Depression-era reformers. We’re going to have to accept that the most important word in the chant “Yes We Can” is “We” and nudge the President in the direction he needs to go to save the US economy.

Co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, and author of Obama’s Challenge: America’s Economic Crisis and the Power of a Transformative Presidency, Robert Kuttner has some words of tough love for President Obama:

Barack Obama is one of three nominees I voted for with enthusiasm. The first, Lyndon Johnson (then in his 1964 civil-rights and anti-poverty phase), self-destructed over Vietnam. The second, George McGovern, lost 49 states. For the next three decades, Republican presidents pulled the country and the prevailing ideology far right, while Democratic interludes moved it only to the center.

But Obama portended something different altogether. Here was a rendezvous of a gifted, principled, and politically shrewd leader with a deep crisis caused by the failure of free-market ideology. It was — and is — the most stunning political opportunity for American progressives since Franklin Roosevelt. My reaction to Obama’s election was joy, relief, gratitude.

So it is awkward to find myself in semi-opposition after barely 100 days. I’m not a chronic malcontent. I credit Obama with real leadership on multiple fronts, from redeeming the Constitution to reclaiming America’s constructive role in the world. I think he is handling several tricky issues well — accepting the need for large short-term deficits; disclosing details of Bush-era torture without personally sponsoring an inquisition; moving universal health coverage; devising a labor-law reform that can perhaps get 60 votes. All this is huge. But there still is a large risk that Obama will blow the opportunity that history has handed him, and that the political right, though currently in disarray, will pick up the pieces.

The reason, of course, is the economy. The past weeks have seen efforts to seize on every shred of good (or not as bad as expected) economic news. The commercial paper market is loosening up! Some new homeowners are getting bargains! The economy only lost 539,000 jobs in April instead of the predicted 620,000!

Even so, the most optimistic of economists predicts a long slog. We will likely avert a second Great Depression. But we still face a prolonged Great Stagnation, one that could be far worse than necessary because of the administration’s circuitous, Wall Street–friendly approach to reviving the banks.

Read the whole article here.

 

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Chelsea Green’s Margo Baldwin Makes Book Business Mag’s Top 50 Women in Publishing

Tuesday, May 26th, 2009

Book Business magazine just published their first ever annual list of the “Top 50 Women in Publishing,” and Chelsea Green’s own co-founder, president, and publisher Margo Baldwin made the list. Congratulations, Margo!

Since 1984, Chelsea Green has been leading the industry not only in sustainability content, but also in its publishing practices. All of our books are printed on recycled paper; the company helped create the Green Partner Program to help reduce book returns, and is part of the Green Press Initiative to help reduce the environmental impact of book publishing.

Since Margo returned to helm Chelsea Green’s daily operations in 2002, our sales have tripled, we’ve had three New York Times bestsellers (this one, this one, and this one), and we’ve launched this nifty website you’re enjoying this very moment.

From multimillion-dollar acquisitions to multimillion-dollar best-sellers, powerful women stand at every pivotal, decision-making point in the book publishing process. Book Business’ first annual “50 Top Women in Book Publishing” feature recognizes and honors some of these industry leaders who affect and transform how publishing companies do business, and what—and how—consumers read.

The women who were selected this year represent various segments of the industry, from educational publishers and university presses to the world’s largest trade publishers.

They have founded publishing companies and started their own imprints; signed coveted authors and fostered virtual unknowns who have skyrocketed to the top of The New York Times Best-Seller List. They have orchestrated complex manufacturing projects and spearheaded environmental initiatives that are lessening the industry’s carbon footprint. They have championed new technologies and implemented them in ways that mark industry “firsts”; created and launched marketing campaigns that have enticed and engaged readers both in stores and online.

And beyond the duties and responsibilities of the positions they hold, they have impacted the business of book publishing with service to industry organizations and by speaking and contributing at industry events. Whatever individual ways each woman has contributed, they are all, in a word—inspiring.

In the pages that follow, you will meet these top women in book publishing and learn a little about their career paths and industry accomplishments and achievements. Each woman also has shared with Book Business readers her best tip for succeeding in book publishing.

[...]

Margo Baldwin, Co-founder, President and Publisher, Chelsea Green
Baldwin founded Chelsea Green with her husband, Ian Baldwin. The 25-year-old company publishes books on sustainable living. Since late 2002, when Baldwin stepped back in to run Chelsea Green (after an 8-year hiatus from daily management to raise her children), the company’s sales have tripled and it has had three New York Times best-sellers.

  • Tip: “… You must have a sustainable publishing model. That means hewing to an editorial focus and publishing niche, not paying oversized advances, keeping returns below 20 percent, and publishing content that not only is relevant and timely, but continues to add to your core backlist. Without backlist, no publishing company can survive.”

Read the whole article here.

How I Found My Sweet Spot: Job Advice for 2009 Graduates

Tuesday, May 26th, 2009

Spring marks that time of year when twenty-somethings all over the world start to develop anxiety disorders. College is over and the Real World awaits—the sharpest of double-edged swords. You’re free from school, for the first time since you were five. But the working world is just around the bend—and it smells fresh blood.

Many of you readers probably spent four years at a college that championed individuality, creativity, and passion. But that’s not really what the Real World has at the top of its To Do list. When I graduated I was told to pursue my dreams, but no one added that hardly anyone wants to hire a dreamer. I was urged to make art and hike the trails abroad, but no one gave tips on how to land a day job that pays the bills. I was told to continue honing my mind, but that don’t necessarily bring in the bones. So unless you’re coming from a vocational school or have serious connects (which, by the way, don’t always get you where you want to go), it’s quite possible that upon graduating, you feel as I did: hung out to dry by your inside-out pockets. And it’s true what they say—the job market sucks out there. But that might actually be in your favor. Here’s why.

  1. It buys you time. The economic recession means less work is available, so it’s harder than ever to find a “career” right away. This means more time to sink into life after college, which is never a bad thing, and part time work doesn’t bear the weight of commitment or sacrifice an entry level office job you hate does (which, incidentally, may pay even less.)
  2. There’s a climate of re-evaluation. These days everything seems ripe with reflection, and even those with steady work are forced to reconsider their values, as it could all be ripped from them at any time. What can they afford, and what can they live without? What’s Plan B? Suffice it to say, you’re not alone in the search for purpose. Many people are starting over right now.
  3. It will force you to be imaginative. There are a million things one can do in the world, many of which you may not have considered before. A stressed economy calls for more ingenuity amongst its inhabitants, which can lead you (albeit perhaps using stranger paths) to your own “niche.” Not to mention the local, small business opportunities that pop up in times like these.

This, of course, does not take fully into account those who may need to find work to feed their families, or to pay off massive loans. Money is important, and we need it to survive in the world as it is now. But there are ways we can go about making money that are less…soul crushing, according to some.

Writer Dave Pollard, in Finding the Sweet Spot: The Natural Entrepreneur’s Guide to Responsible, Sustainable, Joyful Work, offers graduates (and other people beginning new careers) real advice on how to approach the job market, in a way that honors one’s own passions first and foremost. Pollard says we should not dread going to work, and that it is possible to find our truest profession by combining our gifts, passions, and purpose. What a concept: to be able to enjoy one’s life, if given the opportunity. To find our “sweet spot” as Pollard calls it, where there is an intersection between what we love to do, and our work. Many cynics will say this is impossible. Don’t listen to them.

In my first years out of college, I believed the options were artist or office (and I had to choose the latter to pay the bills.) Not that the two years I spent in urban office land were torture—I was healthy and my rent got paid—but when you spend eight hours a day doing something that isn’t in line with your true nature, it wears on you, and fast. And while true, if you’re lucky enough to have gone to college to begin with, it makes sense to honor the many doors a degree can open; but you can get sucked into the grind without knowing it. I know people who say, “I woke up fifty years later and wondered what I did with my life.” I didn’t want to be one of these people. Life’s too short.

Six months ago, I decided it was time to change everything. During the most historic presidential election of my lifetime, in the throes of the worst economic recession since the Great Depression, at the emotional peak (or precipice) of my mid-twenties, from the mean streets of New York City—a Greenwich Village apartment, a big job in publishing, and mounting debt—I left my job (an ugly scenario), packed up my life into a friend’s pickup truck, and moved to the middle of rural Vermont. I didn’t have a car, or a clue what I would do when I got there. I went from assisting one of the most powerful literary agents in the world, to being unemployed in the middle of a hay field. But by choice. And most importantly, I had no job waiting for me on the other end.

Why did I do this? While living in the city, I didn’t wake up feeling good about my life. I didn’t believe in my job; I felt like a corporate machine, and I wanted to be a writer. I felt disconnected from my body, alienated from my community (which felt illusory and fractured to begin with), and to be frank, not sure what it was that made me feel human. I’d worked one summer on a farm during college, and loved it. And even though I was conference calling with Pulitzer Prize winning authors, and handling book contracts with world leaders, I thought about farming and writing all the time (I did write a little too, found NYC very distracting.) I was depressed. I google image searched pictures of mountains and lakes. I lay up nights fantasizing about one day living a full life, within my means, where I might wake up excited about the day, where I could work the land, and where I could write. “Dream on, sister!” Is what I heard. Snap out of the fantasy. So I resigned to the thought, I guess everyone hates their job. Life happens on the weekend.

Nuh uh!

I’m not saying great jobs fall from the sky. Sometimes you have to experience boring internships, or things you hate to figure out what you don’t want. Many people need any job at all, just for health insurance. And we all have to pay the bills. But it’s worth remembering, for those interested, that there are environmentally sustainable, socially responsible, and personally joyful jobs that are looking for you: people who seek a connection between their work and their “life,” and believe their labor should reinforce a purpose they believe in. Keep that in the back of your mind in these coming years. Fantasize with your friends about things that seem impossible. Write down what you love to do, what you believe in, and what you’re good at. Times are rough, but in rough times you’re forced to dig deep. I sound like my mother. But it’s true!

 

Read an excerpt of Finding the Sweet Spot by Dave Pollard HERE

Operation Day’s Work: Burritos, Blogging, and My First Day in Publishing

Monday, May 25th, 2009

Guest post by Harmony Spencer (Age 17; Chelsea, VT)

One of the first things I was told when I walked into Chelsea Green Publishing was, “Today is burrito day!” This was one of the many indications that Chelsea Green Publishing was not like any other publishing company. Not that I’ve been in any other publishing house before: I’m still in high school.

My name is Harmony Spencer, I am seventeen years old and in my junior year of high school at Chelsea Public School in Chelsea, Vermont. (No, it is not just a coincidence that they have the same name—Chelsea Green Publishing started in a building next to the green in Chelsea, VT, in 1984.) Today I worked at Chelsea Green for the Operation Day’s Work program that Chelsea (the high school) is a part of. Operation Day’s Work (http://www.usaid.gov/odw/) is a volunteer program where students take off from school for one day, and engage in various jobs in the area. The money we make is donated to a cause of the school’s choice. A lot of schools in the Upper Valley participate in ODW, and I think it is a really great program, not only because students like myself help out local businesses, but they also raise money for developing countries (Africa, in my case).

I support the idea fully, but I have to be honest—it was not volunteer for me. Not that I was forced into it—more that I was volunteered last minute because the girl who signed up got sick. I guess the teacher thought I would be interested because I am one of the editors of The Chelsea Chronicle (the Chelsea high school newsletter.) But I’m not going to complain, because while most of my friends are out doing yard work and moving furniture, I get to miss school and sit in a comfortable air-conditioned office!

All kidding aside, I have done much more than sit since I got here: first I helped look through books for ideas for Chelsea Green Publishing’s blog, then I tore apart about half a million invoice sheets and stapled and filed until my thumbs were sore, and finally I switched to packing books into mailing boxes, sticking on labels, and writing, “To so-and-so from Taylor [their Publicist]” so many times that I almost forgot my own name.

Okay, that was me complaining a little bit, but in all seriousness, I have had a wicked fun time while I was here, and they did buy me a burrito from Boloco! Everyone who works here is super social and nice, and the environment is much more laid back then what I thought a publishing house would be like. I am very glad to have had this experience, and hopefully the money I made will help to make someone’s life better.


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