no cxn
no db
Chelsea Green - The Politics and Practice of Sustainable Living. : Chelsea Green

A Man Apart: Remembering Bill Coperthwaite’s Radical Life

January 28th, 2015 by admin

A Man Apart is the story—part family memoir and part biography—of Peter Forbes and Helen Whybrow’s longtime friendship with Bill Coperthwaite (A Handmade Life), whose unusual, and even radical, life and fierce ideals helped them examine and understand their own.

Framed by Coperthwaite’s sudden death and brought alive through the month-long adventure of building with him what would turn out to be his last yurt, Forbes and Whybrow deftly explore the timeless lessons of Coperthwaite’s experiment in intentional living and self-reliance. They also reveal an important story about the power and complexities of mentorship: the opening of one’s life to someone else to learn together, and carrying on in that person’s physical absence.

A review in Booklist puts it best: “In this loving tribute to Coperthwaite, Forbes and Whybrow have crafted an inspiring biography … Interweaving anecdotes of their own interactions with Coperthwaite, including the construction of a final, sunlight-filled yurt, the authors capture the full spectrum of this sometimes curmudgeonly man’s gregariousness, resourcefulness, and optimism. Although Coperthwaite’s dreams of worldwide cooperative and sustainable communities have not yet been realized, this reverent memoir will help keep his environmental ideals alive.”

We asked the authors about Coperthwaite’s life and his influence upon them and others. Here’s what they had to say.

Both of you had similar, but different experiences, as mentees of Bill Coperthwaite. How did they differ for you, how did they overlap, and how did you incorporate those different lessons into your own shared experience as a family?

Peter: Bill gave us both a powerful example of how to live a life: the role of work and how to protect what is most meaningful. Our decision to turn to farming and a life led closer to the land was given great encouragement by our relationship to Bill. I had little skill working with my hands before meeting Bill and he opened that entire world up to me. It’s very true that the experience of learning how to carve a spoon became the encouragement to do a great many other bigger things with my life that relied not just on my mead but on his head and my hands working together. That’s been enormously influential and satisfying in my life.

Finally, Bill’s model for how he lived on the land in deep relationship to place and nature changed how I thought about conservation and the role of people and community in land conservation. Directly because of Bill, people and their relationship to nature and to one another became a part of what conservation was meant to protect.

Helen: I think the fact that we knew Bill somewhat differently, and yet shared the understanding that he was central to our life together, makes our story richer and more layered. In some ways Peter’s relationship with Bill was more intimate, and yet as with all intimacy, that also made it more difficult. Bill and Peter did very important work together over the years with land conversation and creating community and it was not without its tensions. I was on the sidelines of that work, and yet Peter and I would have long conversations about it. My relationship with Bill had its own dimensions and really deepened as he aged and our children grew up.

What are some of his lasting lessons in your lives, and what do you think he’s left you to keep figuring out?

Peter: How to live the life you really want as opposed to the life society wants you to lead or the life your parents and family want you to lead. How do you stick with what is truly most important to you. Experience of life is far, far more important than possessions. How do you stay on the edge of experience as opposed to sinking into the comfort of possessions?

Helen: I think what I ponder most since his death is how we learn through life. He showed me that you never have to stop learning or being curious or even traveling in search of new experiences. He went to China when he was 83! He made me think a great deal about how we teach our young, how we treat our old, how the way we approach education is often against the grain of how we naturally learn best. He opened my eyes to how education should be rooted in multi-generational community life, and its goal should be to create empowered, self-aware citizens who want to come up with empathic and just solutions to the world’s problems, not just able to compete financially in a global marketplace and achieve individual status. We started home schooling our youngest daughter after Bill died, and almost every single day I want to talk to him about teaching. I’m left figuring out the How.

Bill Coperthwaite is often compared to Helen and Scott Nearing, and even described as a “modern-day” Henry David Thoreau. Is that accurate? Was he something else entirely?

Peter: Bill considered himself to be a public intellectual and social critic like Thoreau and Nearing, which is why those labels have stuck on Bill. But Bill’s life hasn’t yet achieved that same status because, in my view, he was actually more true to the dogma and less good of a writer than either Nearing or Thoreau. Bill’s experiment in living was more rigorous and true to his values and lasted longer than Thoreau or Nearing, but he didn’t have as effective ways to talk about it. Bill never got a phone and never went on the lecture circuit like Nearing regularly did. Bill remained in true opposition to society: from it but not of it. In this true sense, he lived the better example but it was a much harder example for people to find.

Helen: Like many things, it is and it isn’t accurate. When someone lives a life that is so unusual there are few examples to go by, and few comparisons to make that someone would understand. Bill was strongly influenced by Helen and Scott Nearing. He shared many of their values of how to live, how to be in service, and in particular he and Scott believed passionately in trying to live a life that was not part of a system of exploiting others. With Thoreau he shared an ardent pacifism, and a reverence for nature. He went well beyond Thoreau in his committed experiment in simple living. I think Bill shared an impish sense of humor that comes out in Thoreau’s writing at times. Scott Nearing, on the other hand, Bill thought to be “terribly dour.”

Homemade Bone Broth – A Healthy Diet Staple

January 26th, 2015 by admin

Have you had your steaming hot bowl of bone broth today? If not, you might want to consider integrating this nutrient rich, immune system boosting elixir into your daily diet. With recent articles about the benefits of bone broth in The New York Times and Epicurious calling it “the new coffee,” it’s clear broth is taking off as a food trend in 2015.

Learn how to make your own chicken, beef, and fish bone broths using the following instructions from The Heal Your Gut Cookbook: Nutrient-Dense Recipes for Intestinal Health Using the GAPS Diet by Hilary Boynton and Mary G. Brackett. As the foundation of both the GAPS and Paleo diets, bone broths are used in the early stages to starve pathogenic bacteria in your digestive system and heal your gut. Sealing a leaky gut can help treat disorders ranging from allergies and asthma to autism, ADD, depression, and more. However, as a healthy source of calcium, potassium, and protein, anyone looking to improve their digestive health can reap the nutritional benefits of bone broth.

This easy to digest, nourishing broth is made from bones with a small amount of meat on them that you cook on low heat for anywhere from 4-72 hours depending on the type of bones being used and when you think it tastes good. According to Boynton and Brackett, some of the most nutrient-dense animal parts include those you may normally throw away. It might take some getting used to, but once you start adding those chicken feet or fish heads into the pot, your nourished gut will thank you.

For more recipes from books that focus on restorative diets and traditional foods, check out this simple, 4-step method of fermenting vegetables from The Art of Fermentation by Sandor Katz and a recipe for succotash from Full Moon Feast by Jessica Prentice—a cookbook featuring foods that follow the ancient rhythms of the season.

Now, get ready to make bone both a new staple in your diet.

Homemade Bone Broth – The Heal Your Gut Cookbook

A Taoist Approach to Gardening

January 23rd, 2015 by admin

Groundbreaking garden writer Carol Deppe (The Resilient GardenerBreed Your Own Vegetable Varieties) has done it again with her latest book, The Tao of Vegetable Gardening. Called a “vegetable gardener’s treasury” by Booklist, this new guide focuses on some of the most popular home garden vegetables—tomatoes, green beans, peas, and leafy greens—and through them illustrates the key principles and practices that beginner and experienced gardeners alike need to know to successfully plant and grow just about any food crop.

In addition to practical advice on topics like how to deal with late blight and establishing your own DIY seed bank, Deppe explores the deeper essence of gardening both in terms of nature and ourselves. Her work has long been inspired and informed by the philosophy and wisdom of Tao Te Ching, the 2,500-­year-­old work attributed to Chinese sage Lao Tzu. She has organized her book into chapters that echo fundamental Taoist concepts: Balance, Flexibility, Honoring the Essential Nature (your own and that of your plants), Effortless Effort, Non-Doing, and even Non-­Knowing.

The “Non-Doing” concept may be hard for some to comprehend. Isn’t gardening supposed to be hard work? Deppe explains how easy it is to fall into a pattern of unnecessary efforts.

“There are three reasons to do something: It is the right thing to do, it is the right time to do it, and you are the right person to do it. Usually, it isn’t, it isn’t, or you aren’t. Gardening books and magazines usually focus on doing. They report the positive—things that worked at least once for someone somewhere on the planet. That is only part of the story. We gardeners are an inventive lot. We are capable of thinking of lots of other things to try that we have never seen anybody do or write about. Many of these other things have undoubtedly been tried repeatedly by gardeners in many times and places, and have failed to work for every single person who tried them. For everything that at least sometimes works, there are many-fold other things that never work. I have discovered quite a lot of these.”

In the spirit of doing less, Deppe provides helpful lists like twenty-four good places not to plant a tree and thirty-seven good reasons for not planting various vegetables. She also introduces her innovative “Eat-All Greens Garden” which could be the easiest, most space-saving, and labor-efficient way of growing greens. With this method, a family can raise all their summer greens as well as freeze and dry enough for the winter months with even a tiny garden—a perfect approach for small-scale and urban gardeners. The trick is to use plant varieties that grow fast. “The fast growth is necessary in order to produce plants that have succulent stems and all prime leaves even when large,” writes Deppe.

To get started on your own simple sow and harvest style garden and for delicious ways to prepare your bounty of greens, check out the following “Eat-All-Greens” excerpt from The Tao of Vegetable Gardening. And, for more gardening wisdom from Carol Deppe, here’s an interview she did on growing food in uncertain times – How to Grow and Store the 5 Crops You Need to Survive.

The Tao of Vegetable Gardening: The Eat-All Greens Garden

Year in Review: 30 Years of Independent Publishing

January 22nd, 2015 by admin

We wrapped up another year at Chelsea Green Publishing with a party, and not just any party — our 30th anniversary party.

We had plenty to celebrate:

If you don’t believe us, check out these stellar profiles in a variety of Vermont media, our hometown paper The Valley News, and book industry journal Publishers Weekly.

If you weren’t at our 30th anniversary celebration at Three Tomatoes in Lebanon, NH, we posted some pictures featuring some of the attendees – including co-founders Margo and Ian Baldwin, organic gardening pioneer Eliot Coleman, and dozens of authors, as well as current and former staff.

At the party, we officially released The Chelsea Green Reader, a book that Library Journal said:

“Shows Chelsea Green’s wide range: excerpts from more than 100 publications encompass poetry and fiction, memoirs, nature and adventure travel, gardening, politics, green living, food, permaculture and agriculture, and many more categories. The foreword by cofounder and publisher emeritus Ian Baldwin proudly notes how often Chelsea Green was ahead of the curve: such subjects as fermented foods, hemp farming, community-supported agriculture, and reducing car dependency were covered in the company’s titles before they became trendy or even widely accepted.

Remaining ahead of the curve and relevant is where Chelsea Green continues to find itself as a publisher in an era when it seems like many publishers simply follow what’s “hot” or “trendy.”

As co-founder, and our current president and publisher Margo Baldwin told The Valley News: “I think we had good instincts of what’s coming next. The challenge is staying on the leading edge and remaining important.”

Turn Sap and Syrup into Beer, Wine, and Liquor

January 20th, 2015 by admin

As much as we love to drizzle (or drown) our pancakes in maple syrup, you might be surprised to learn that tree sap can actually be used to make an array of drinks, with results that will far surpass your typical sugar buzz. And with scientists predicting this season’s maple harvest to be more bountiful than usual, it’s not too early to start thinking about how to make the most of your ample sap flows.

This following excerpt from The Sugar Maker’s Companion highlights several companies who have ventured into the world of sap related alcoholic beverages. From maple mead to maple beer and sap ale to birch wine, these products featured by author Michael Farrell are sure to spur your creativity, whether you are a beginning homebrewer or a budding entrepreneur.

For those who like to keep things simple, maple sap is also just as delicious straight from the tree spile. To get started here’s a brief tutorial on when and how to tap your trees.

The Sugarmaker’s Companion: Brewing, Fermenting, and Distilling with Tree Sap and Syrup by Chelsea Green Publishing

The Nourishing Homestead: Practiculture and Principles

January 19th, 2015 by admin

Whether you live on 4 acres, 40 acres, or in a 400-square-foot studio apartment, the lessons you’ll glean from The Nourishing Homestead by Ben Hewitt (with Penny Hewitt) will help anyone hoping to close the gaps that economic separation has created in our health, spirit, and skills. This book offers practical ways to grow nutrient-dense food on a small plot of land, and think about your farm, homestead, or home as an ecosystem.

Ben and Penny (and their two sons) maintain copious gardens, dozens of fruit and nut trees and other perennial plantings, as well as a pick-your-own blueberry patch. In addition to these cultivated food crops, they also forage for wild edibles, process their own meat, make their own butter, and ferment, dry, and can their own vegetables. Their focus is to produce nutrient-dense foods from vibrant, mineralized soils for themselves and their immediate community. They are also committed to sharing the traditional skills that support their family, helping them be self-sufficient and thrive in these uncertain times.

The Hewitts’ story is reminiscent of The Good Life, by Helen and Scott Nearing, and is sure to inspire a new generation of homesteaders, or anyone seeking a simpler way of life and a deeper connection to the world.

Ben Hewitt uses the term “practiculture” to describe his family’s work with the land—a term that encompasses the many practical life skills and philosophies they embody to create a thriving homestead.

What is “practiculture”? Here is how Ben Hewitt describes it:

The term practiculture evolved out of our struggle to find a concise way to describe our work with this land. Of course, no single word or term can fully explain what we do. But in practiculture, I feel as if I have something that is concise but also opens the door to a broader conversation. It’s an intriguing word, and not one that yet enjoys widespread understanding. It also contains elements that are immediately recognizable: Practical. Agriculture. Practiculture. And not just agriculture, but culture, as defined by our work with the land, cultivating its teeming populations of beings and bacteria. The longer I do this work, the less I feel as if we are practicing agriculture so much as we are simply practicing culture.

Practiculture also refers to our belief that growing and processing our food, as well as the other essentials necessary to our good health, should be both affordable and, for lack of a better term, doable. Practical. It should make sense, not according to the flawed logic of the commodity marketplace, which is always trying to convince us that doing for ourselves is impractical, but according to our self-defined logic that grasps the true value of real food to body, mind, spirit, and soil.

Finally, practiculture is about learning practical life skills and the gratification that comes from applying those skills in ways that benefit one’s self and community. This sort of localized, land-based knowledge is rapidly disappearing from first-world countries in large part because the centers of profit and industry would rather we not possess it. They know that its absence makes us increasingly dependent on their offerings.

The Hewitts also live by some touchstone principles, ideals and ideas they return to at times when they are faced with a decision to which there is no obvious answer. We’ve listed a few of them below, but additional principles (and full descriptions) can be found in The Nourishing Homestead, and are worth reflection.

As Ben Hewitt writes, “This is not a literal list, etched into stone or rolled into a yellowed scroll, although years ago we did create a written document to help us determine the direction of our land-based practices. Truthfully, we are not always able to act in harmony with these principles. There are times when circumstances compel us to behave otherwise. But even in these cases, it’s valuable to understand and acknowledge the compromise we’re making.”

Guiding Principles:

  • The way we think, act, and perceive the world is a reflection of the world we wish to inhabit.
  • We will produce the most nourishing food possible.
  • Real nutrition comes only from vital soils that enable plants and animals to express their full potential.
  • The labor to produce nourishing food is itself of value.
  • Do not let the logic of the market dictate the logic of the homestead.
  • Resilience of systems is the outgrowth of diversity, redundancy, simplicity, and, ultimately, resourcefulness.
  • Resourcefulness of body, emotion, spirit, and skills is just as important as resilience of systems.
  • The manner in which you spend your time is, in fact, the manner in which you spend your life. Time is not money; it is life.
  • We are not stewards of the land; the land is the steward of us.
  • Interdependence, not self-sufficiency.
  • Living in alignment. It is important to us that our daily activities comprise as much as possible actions we enjoy and which can be defended ethically and intellectually, not only from the perspective of humanity, but also from that of the natural world.
  • When in doubt, be generous.

Consider adopting a list of your own. If nothing else, it may compel you to think carefully about your guiding principles, and in this regard, become a step toward living life on your own terms.

 

Grow Your Own Sprouts This Winter

January 14th, 2015 by admin

At this point in winter, if you haven’t already exhausted your cellar of root vegetables, then you’re probably exhausted with it. But just because the ground outside may still be frozen, doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy fresh greens.

One simple and healthy way to breathe life back into your winter diet is sprouting your own seeds. In the excerpt at the end of this post from Wild Flavors, author Didi Emmons shows you how to make nutrient-rich sprouts from all kinds of edible seeds right in your own kitchen.

Once you’ve mastered the skill of sprouting, you can incorporate sprouted seeds into nourishing and tasty dishes. Check out this recipe for Vietnamese Sprouted Spring Rolls and Korean Soybean Sprout-Miso Soup from R.J. Ruppenthal’s Fresh Food from Small Spaces and the below recipe for Sprouted Amaranth Alegria Energy Bars from Katrina Blair’s The Wild Wisdom of Weeds. According to Blair, amaranth is one of the easiest wild seeds to gather and sprout.

Sprouted Amaranth Alegria Bars
1⁄4 cup sprouted amaranth seeds
1 cup sprouted sesame seeds
1 cup sprouted sunflower seeds
2 tablespoons raw cacao powder
1 cup sprouted pumpkin seeds
3 tablespoons raw honey

Directions: Mix all ingredients together and shape into bars. Dehydrate either in the sun for a day or in the dehydrator for several hours until firm. Enjoy this living raw treat as a snack on adventures in the wild. You can also make this bar by toasting the amaranth in a dry skillet and then adding raw, unsprouted, lightly ground sunflower and pumpkin seeds. Although sprouting the seeds brings a higher energy to the bars, toasting them is another way to make the recipe in a very short time so as to have it available when you need it and to bring a unique flavor into the recipe.

Happy Sprouting!

*****
Growing Sprouts: The Eva Way
By Did Emmons

Growing sprouts is one of the simplest things you can do to breathe life into the deprivations of winter. As an urbanite who doesn’t have much space or sun to grow food, sprouts are one thing I can grow at any point in the year. Sprouts are replete with vitamins, minerals, proteins, and enzymes. Sprouting is easy, as easy a process as cooking rice. And there is a satisfaction in fostering and watching them grow and prosper. It feeds my maternal side, without the crying and diapers.

Most any edible seed can become an edible sprout, but I like to sprout wheat berries, kamut, quinoa, lentils, and chickpeas. Other possibilities include hulled sunflower seeds, buckwheat groats, spelt, soybeans, peas, brown mustard seeds, radish seeds, broccoli seeds, rye seeds, cabbage seeds, and herb seeds. You can also sprout raw peanuts, black-eyed peas, adzuki beans, green channa, and, more commonly, alfalfa, clover, and mung bean. Tomato and potato sprouts are said to be poisonous.

Two Ways To Grow Sprouts

There are two main ways to grow sprouts at home: in a jar or in a bag (of any sturdy mesh fabric, whether natural or synthetic fiber).SproutsfromWildFlavors

  • In either case, start by rinsing about 1 cup of legumes or seeds and then letting them soak overnight.
  • Drain, rinse again, and transfer the legumes or seeds to a big glass jar or mesh bag large enough to hold five times the quantity of seeds or legumes that you have.
  • Tie the bag closed or secure cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar to keep debris out and to facilitate easy straining. Hang the bag or store the jar in a dark, humid place if possible, and rinse morning and night.
  • Eventually, after somewhere between two and ten days, depending on the type of seed, you will notice that the seeds have sprouted.

You may have noticed that there is a lot of rinsing involved here, and watching all of that barely used water head down the drain goes against every fiber in Eva’s body. When she rinses the seeds or legumes the first time, she catches that liquid in a bowl. To rinse the seeds or legumes afterward, she simply dips her bag into the captured water, lifts it up, and shakes the liquid out. Once the seeds or legumes have sprouted and the rinsing has ended, she uses the liquid for a variety of creative uses, from cooking her morning cereal to watering (and nourishing) plants.

Sources

Don’t buy your seeds at a garden center, there is a risk they may be contaminated with chemicals or bacteria. I get my seeds at a local natural foods store and they sprout—no problem. But if you are serious, there are plenty of websites like Sproutman.com that sell seed grown specifically for human consumption. “The Sproutman” also offers a helpful circular sprout chart for $5 that lists an array of seeds you can sprout, with the corresponding sprouting times, the suggested method, the level of difficulty, uses, flavors, and so on. It is worth getting.

Storage

After giving sprouts one final rinse, put them back in the same container you grew them in or in a plastic bag poked with a knife to ensure air circulation. Sprouts are living plants. They last about a week in the fridge in a plastic container, though legume sprouts may last longer.

A Conversation With Winemaker, Farmer, Author Deirdre Heekin

January 12th, 2015 by admin

Named one of the best wine books of 2014 by The New York Times, Deirdre Heekin’s An Unlikely Vineyard takes readers on a journey of learning how to grow wine in the unlikely hills of Vermont and tells the story of her quest to express the essence of place in every bottle.

“Heekin gives a lyrical description of her earthly discoveries…and imbues her accounts with the wonder of a child discovering an earthworm in the mud for the first time,” writes Lauren Mowry, wine and travel writer for The Village Voice. And, when it comes to capturing terroir and following the principles of natural winemaking, Heekin told the wine columnist for The Boston Globe, “I am constantly listening and responding to what the fruit wants to be.”

However, more than just a book on winemaking, An Unlikely Vineyard covers the evolution of Heekin’s homefarm from overgrown fields to a fertile landscape that melds with its natural environment and includes a wealth of information on growing food naturally using the principles of organics, permaculture, and biodynamic farming.

Chelsea Green’s Shay Totten sat down with Heekin to talk about her new book and her efforts to deeply understand the land from which both her food and grapevines are grown. See below for their conversation.

Related Links:
Wine Pairings from Deirdre Heekin
Capturing Landscape in a Wine: The Unlikely Vineyard

ST: What inspired you to start growing grapes on a hillside in Vermont – of all places – and what were the first grapes you grew?

DH: Initially, I was inspired by our land. We have a southeast facing meadow that is perfectly situated to capture sun and air. Our soil is complex and full of stones. But for a long time we only kidded about growing wine here. It wasn’t until I visited Lincoln Peak Vineyard over in the Champlain Valley and tasted their wines that I understood that Vermont had great potential as a winegrowing region, and that it was possible for us to turn that meadow into a vineyard.

That day we visited Lincoln Peak, we left their nursery with over 100 vines to plant! A combination of Marquette, La Crescent, Frontenac, Frontenac Gris, and Frontenac Blanc.

ST: How long have you been growing food on the farm for your restaurant, and how much of the restaurant’s food starts from your farm?

DH: We started growing ingredients for our restaurant kitchen about 16 years ago. Our goal is to try to produce 100 percent of the produce for Osteria Pan e Salute (our restaurant in Woodstock, VT) all year long. We are very close to that during the growing season and getting closer and closer during the winter with our winter greenhouse and the root cellar. This year, livestock came on to our home farm in Barnard, VT, so now our eggs for Osteria all come from here as well as our chicken, and soon we will have our own pork.

ST: How do you measure the success of your harvests, and have they improved in recent years?

DH: I am still so amazed that I am growing wine, I am always delighted that the vines actually produce fruit! All kidding aside, I look to the quality of the fruit and how the vines have handled the growing season in relation to the year before.

I look at how the bunch is formed, how the plants weather the weather. If it is a rainy season, how resistant are they to mildew and black rot? I look at the new wood they are producing, how much, how strong, how clean of disease, and when does it harden off in the autumn.

Given that we are dealing with either young vines, or recuperating vines, I look to their production. Some vines we are taking back to square one and limiting their bunch production until they are stronger and healthier, so I monitor how much well-formed fruit they are producing.

But each year is different, and I don’t expect a constant jump in quantity or growth to measure success each year. What I do measure is quality and nuance. Individuality. While it is certainly a good thing to have minimal to no disease in the vineyard, when you work organically or biodynamically, growing seasons won’t be perfect, and vines won’t be perfect. I try to flex with nature and know that some seasons will be better than others in terms of the conditions. What I ultimately look for is the quality of the juice from the berries and the wine they make. As long as I feel the berries that go into the wine are saying something about where they are from and the vagaries and little victories of the season, it is a good harvest.

ST: How are the harvests now at the new vineyards that you have taken control of, in terms of managing the fruit during the growing season?

DH: In just two growing seasons, we have seen big changes in the vines, especially this year. This year was a near perfect growing season, so we were very lucky to have so much sun and dry weather to which the vines really responded. But the pruning we did this year also really redirected the energy of the plants back to their center, back to their roots, and as consequence the fruit was beautiful. We grew a little in our tonnage of fruit this year, but then we doubled the juice itself. The ratio of fruit to stem was greater this year. The natural fermentations took off immediately and the yeast colonies from the field have continued to be healthy and strong.

Plants that we didn’t expect much from this year, produced better than we thought, and plants that had been previously destroyed by girdling by field pests a couple of winters ago, grew new trunks, giving us healthy new plants that won’t need to be replanted next year. I am looking forward to next year’s revelations.

ST: Throughout the book the phrase “Wine is made in the vineyard” appears. What does that mean?

DH: I believe that wine is made in the vineyard rather than the cellar. The work that the winegrower does in the field during the season is where I see most of the craft in creating interesting, thoughtful wine. I see the winegrower as a guide or a companion to the vines and the fruit that comes in at harvest, not as a manipulator in the cellar. Most of the effort takes place during the growing season; for me the true winegrower or maker is simply responding with a very light hand to what he or she understands what the wine wants to become as the season continues from crush to bottle.

I have a lot of friends on the west coast who don’t have their own vines, but buy fruit from local growers and make really remarkable wines. In this instance, these winemakers educate themselves on the parcels that produce their fruit, and they work with the grower, either helping to formulate the growing plan, or working in concert with the grower’s understanding of his or her land.

And that’s what it’s all about in the end: Understanding the land and how the plants grow in a particular place. For me, it is the vine’s relationship to its terroir, the personality of the field, that dictates the wine.

Hurry! Holiday Sale Ends Today

January 11th, 2015 by admin

This is it. Today is your last chance to save with our extended holiday sale.

Save 35% off every purchase with discount code CGS14. But hurry – it’ll be gone tomorrow.

Don’t forget about our new releases, DVDs and bundles!

Need a recommendation? We’re here to help. Email us at [email protected].

P.S. Remember we offer free shipping on orders of $100 or more!

The Heal Your Gut Cookbook

Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation

Hemp Bound

Integrated Forest Gardening

The ALL NEW Don't Think like an Elephant!

The Art of Fermentation

The Small-Scale Poultry Flock

Edible Forest Gardens Set

The Wild Wisdom of Weeds

An Unlikely Vineyard

The Resilient Farm and Homestead

Angels by the River Gaia's Garden Defending Beef Grass, Soil, Hope

 

View All Books Instructional DVDs New Releases Bundles and Sets
Gardening Food Simple Living Renewable Energy
Nature and Environment Green Building Business Science

*Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only).

The Latest Offerings From Our Publishing Partners

January 8th, 2015 by admin

In addition to publishing our own books on the politics and practice of sustainable living, Chelsea Green offers a helping hand to smaller publishers and those based overseas to bring their books to a wider audience. For the latest selection of titles from our publishing partners, check out the list below.

You’ll find books on a variety of topics including examining plants across the globe, observing natural landscapes in the United Kingdom, revealing the secrets of the truffle, and more.

Here’s an update on the new books from Permanent Publications, one of our strongest partnerships:

Around the World in 80 Plants- This book takes us on an original and inspiring adventure around the temperate world, introducing us to the author Stephen Barstow’s top eighty perennial leafy-green vegetables. Sprinkled with recipes inspired by local traditional gastronomy, this is a fascinating book, an entertaining journey, and a real milestone in climate-friendly vegetable growing from a pioneering expert on the subject.

The Vegan Book of Permaculture- In this groundbreaking book, author Graham Burnett demonstrates how understanding universal patterns and principles, and applying these to our own gardens and lives, can make a very real difference to both our personal lives and the health of our planet. Interspersed with an abundance of delicious, healthy, and exploitation-free recipes, Burnett provides solutions-based approaches to an eco-friendly, truly vegan lifestyle.

How to Read the Landscape (coming soon) - From his years of experience observing the landscape across the UK, author Patrick Whitefield explains everything from the details, such as the meaning behind the shapes of different trees, to how whole landscapes, including woodland, grassland, and moorland, fit together and function as a whole. Opening How to Read the Landscape is like opening a window on a whole new way of seeing the living world around you.

And, coming soon from some of our other publishing partners, Slow Food Editore and The Greenhorns, check out these new titles:

For the fourth consecutive year, Slow Food International offers an English-language edition of their guide to Italian wines whose qualities extend well beyond the palate. With visits to 350 cellars, its 3000 wine reviews describe not only what’s in the glass, but also what goes into the winemaking process for each label. (coming soon)
An aura of mystery surrounds the most precious of the earth’s fruits. This Slow Food manual dispels it, describing the various types of tuber, explaining how to recognize and select them, and offering suggestions for buying truffles, cleaning them, storing them, and using them in the kitchen. This practical advice is complemented by a series of itineraries in the homeland of the Alba white truffle and a selection of classic and creative recipes. (coming soon)
The theme of the second New Farmers’ Almanac is “Agrarian Technology.” In this volume, you will find answers to practical questions about institutional forms, and future-making: restoration agro-forestry, reclaiming high desert urban farmland, starting a co-op, pickup truck maintenance, pirate radio utopia, cheap healthcare, farming while pregnant, farm terraces, and quite a few more. (coming soon)

Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com