Chelsea Green Publishing

The Cob Builders Handbook

Pages:176 pages
Book Art:Black and white photos and illustrations
Size: 8.5 x 11 inch
Publisher:Groundworks
Paperback: 9780965908207
Pub. Date March 01, 1998

The Cob Builders Handbook

You Can Hand-Sculpt Your Own Home, 3rd Edition

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
March 01, 1998

$23.95

Cob (an old English word for lump) is old-fashioned concrete, made out of a mixture of clay, sand, and straw. Becky Bee's manual is a friendly guide to making your own earth structure, with chapters on design, foundations, floors, windows and doors, finishes, and of course, making glorious cob.

"I believe that building with cob is a way to recreate community and experience the joy of working together while taking back the right to build our own homes and look after our Mother Earth."

She loves doing something that makes sense in a world where lots of things don't.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Becky Bee

Becky Bee has built natural structures in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Central America, and Samoa. Her company Groundworks, has been at the forefront of the cob revival: building, teaching workshops, and hosting natural building symposiums.

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