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Book Data

ISBN: 9781603583015
Year Added to Catalog: 2010
Book Format: Paperback and DVD
Book Art: 25 b&w illustrations, more than 90 recipes/Additional one-on-one interview and two recipes
Dimensions: 7 x 10 / 1 disc
Number of Pages: 208 pages / 110 minutes
Book Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
Release Date: September 30, 2010
Web Product ID: 557

Also By This Author


Wild Fermentation and Fermentation Workshop with Sandor Ellix Katz: Set

by Sandor Ellix Katz

Foreword by Sally Fallon

Related Articles

The Jew and the Carrot blog

(Jewish Daily Foreward)

October 2010

“The Passionate Pickler”
By Aaron Kagan

Traditional Ashkenazi cuisine without fermented foods would be unrecognizable, not to mention less tangy. Latkes would be served without sour cream, and with no corned beef or sauerkraut, a deli sandwich at Katz’s would be nothing more than two vacant pieces of rye toast, unaccompanied by a sour pickle no less. Passover seders would have no wine, and without yeast, we’d be stuck with the bread of affliction all 353 to 385 days a (Jewish) year.

Thank goodness, then, for Sandor Katz, aka “Sandorkraut.” Katz is a food activist and fermentation revivalist who specializes in pickled foods from around the world. “[There are] Korean style pickles and Indian style pickles and Lebanese style pickles. People in most parts of the world have some sort of pickles that actually are important parts of their cuisine,” he says. His book, the 2003 Wild Fermentation, a DIY fermented foods bible, includes recipes for everything from kimchi made with fruit to Gv-No-He-Nv, a sour corn drink from the Cherokee tradition.

Read the rest, including two recipes on The Jew & the Carrot.

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Star-Tribune (Minneapolis-St. Paul)

October 2010

Advice from the master
Sandor Katz, author of “Wild Fermentation,” the preeminent book for making your own live-culture foods — everything from kraut to miso to wine — reminds his readers of the simplicity of the process: just salt, vegetables and time. “Fermenting sauerkraut, or anything, is an intrinsically safe process,” he said. “There are no recorded cases of food poisoning.”

Too much poking around in the kraut may introduce bacteria that will produce an unsightly cap of mold on the top layer of the sauerkraut — but it’s perfectly harmless. Just scrape it off and use the kraut below. Once it has fermented, its pH, or level of acidity, will be around 2.6, or well in the safe zone.

I’m still left with the question: How do you know when it’s done fermenting? Is there some sort of general human consensus on what makes sauerkraut, essentially a controlled souring, taste desirable? I like to believe that our taste buds naturally seek deliciousness. Sandor agreed. “Most people can perceive the natural balance.”

But to fermentation authorities, it’s good at any stage of the game. In fact, Sandor found out during his book tour that he could harvest, and enjoy, week-old sauerkraut when he found himself running out of mature kraut. “I like it a lot when it’s six weeks old, but I found that many people prefer a milder flavor.”

His fail-safe approach still doesn’t explain my stinky batch from long ago. By now I’ve guessed that I was too inattentive: Too much time in the barrel (10 weeks) coupled with an unfortunate perch next to a raging wood stove (90 degrees or more) equals two disastrous conditions I will avoid in the future.

Amy Thielen is a chef and writer who lives in Two Inlets, Minn.

Read the full article here.

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Price: $49.95
Format: Paperback and DVD
Status: Available to Ship
Ships: Next day


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