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Book Data

ISBN: 9781603583060
Year Added to Catalog: 2011
Book Format: Paperback
Dimensions: 6 x 9
Number of Pages: 240
Book Publisher: Chelsea Green
Release Date: June 29, 2012
Web Product ID: 665

Also By This Author

The Seed Underground

A Growing Revolution to Save Food

by Janisse Ray

Reviews, Interviews, & Articles

    Reviews
  • Midwest Book Review
  • The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food offers stories of ordinary gardeners who try to save open-pollinated varieties of old-time seeds, and blends their stories with that of Janisse Ray, who watched her grandmother save squash seed and who herself cultivated a garden rich in heirloom varieties and local strengths. It's a story of not just gardening, but harvesting and preserving vintage varieties of food, and will appeal to gardening and culinary collections alike with its powerful account of saving seeds and old varieties on the verge of vanishing.
  • Foreword Reviews: At the center of most of the world’s most enduring epics, myths, and legends are spellbinding tales of plants that offer immortality, grasses and flowers that offer sustenance for humans and other animals, fruit that contains the knowledge of good and evil, and seeds that when sown across a barren land flower into apple trees. As environmental activist and poet Ray reminds us in her own mesmerizing tale, the history of civilization is the history of seeds, and she fiercely and lovingly gathers the stories of individuals committed to saving seeds, not only to preserve the legacy of certain plants but also to ensure plant biodiversity in an agricultural environment where large corporations encourage monoculture.

     

    As a young child, Ray delightfully learned the value of saving seeds, watching the stunning plants that grew from those she sowed. She warmly recalls her grandmother giving her some Jack bean seeds one summer, and from that moment “I got crazy about seeds because I was crazy about plants because long ago I realized that the safest place I could be was in the plant kingdom—where things made sense … where nothing was going to eat you.” Throughout high school—when other girls were dating or playing sports—Ray was ordering seeds, planting, watching, and exhorting them to grow.

    Because of her love of seeds and her practices of saving and planting them to keep crops alive for future generations, Ray discovers organizations and scores of other individuals devoted to saving our food in the same way. With her typically forceful passion, Ray points to the ways in which the system is broken: our food is going extinct (by 2005, 75 percent of the world’s garden vegetables had been lost), and it is hazardous to our health, harming the earth, annihilating pollinators, and nutritionally impotent.

    Ray tells the stories of these many men and women making a difference in their own corners of America, such as Will Bonsall, a “Noah” who’s juggling several hundred varieties of potatoes, peas, and radishes as he saves their seeds, or Sylvia Davatz, who is trying to develop a supply of locally grown seeds as the underpinning of a regional food supply. Encouraged by the overwhelming commitment to the seed revolution, Ray fervently proclaims that we can protect what’s left of our seeds and in our revolutionary gardens, develop the heirlooms of the future. She urges us to begin now.

    Never content simply to weave charming and compelling stories, Janisse Ray offers a long list of what each of us can do—eat real food, buy organic, grow a garden, try to grow as much food as you consume, save your own seeds—to develop a sustainable lifestyle that fosters biodiversity and a richer and more fruitful relationship between humans and nature. Ray provides a helpful list of organizations and resources to help her readers get started.

    Henry Carrigan
    August 30, 2012

  • Booklist Review:Nature writer and advocate Ray continues her thoughtful exploration of rural life with this timely look at heirloom seeds. After sharing some startling statistics (in the last 100 years, 94 percent of seed varieties available in America have been lost), she delves into why and how we have become so dependent upon such a small group of seeds and why this lack of diversity poses such a threat. Ray wisely buttresses facts with personal experiences, recounting the development of her own seed-saving habits, then introducing farmers and gardeners across the country who share their often generations-spanning histories of seed preservation. These personal perspectives of homespun habits stand in stark contrast to industrial agriculture, and support Ray’s argument that the American food system is broken and these are the sorts of people who can show us how to fix it. She succeeds beautifully on all counts, evincing a firm grip on science, history, politics, and culture as she addresses matters of great significance to all of us. — Colleen Mondor
  • Kirkus: A naturalist's rally for the preservation of heirloom seeds amid the agricultural industry's increasing monoculture.

    Ray (Drifting into Darien: A Personal and Natural History of the Altamaha River, 2011, etc.) unabashedly proclaims that seeds are "miracles in tiny packages.” Through accounts of her own journey in saving them, as well as facts and anecdotes, she urges readers to consider the practice, in order to avoid genetic erosion, to improve health, to work against a system that determines and limits availability, and more. Without stridence, Ray forthrightly presents her case, advocating for small organic farmers and less corporate dependence. In her most persuasive chapters, she recounts her travels in Georgia, Vermont, Iowa and North Carolina to meet others involved in saving specific varieties. She emphasizes the importance of diversity and also the ways in which preservation becomes a cultural resource; each seed bears a singular history that is often not only regional, but familial. Readers new to the topic will find that Ray's impassioned descriptions skillfully combine discussions on plant genetics and the metaphorical potential of seeds. Alternating between science and personal stories of finding her own farm, attending a Seed Savers Exchange convention, and increasing activism, the author also includes a brief section on basic seed saving and concludes with chapters that confront the idea of the homegrown as merely idyllic. With a nod toward Wendell Berry, this work emphasizes the importance of individuals working as a community.

    Recommended for experienced gardeners—guerrilla or otherwise—and novices searching for alternatives to processed, corporatized food.
  • Poughkeepsie Journal Article
  • Marketplace Review and Interview
  • Grist Review
  • Atlanta Journal Constitution Review
  • Story Circle Review
  • Earth Eats Interview
  • Publishers Weekly Starred Review
  • New York Times review of Ecology of a Cracker Childhood
  • Grist review of Ecology
  • Yes Magazine review of Ecology
  • Reviews and awards for Ecology on Milkweed Editions' site
  • Swampland.com review of Ecology
  • Dogwood Alliance review of Pinhook
  • Candle Pine review of Ecology
  • Candle Pine review of Ecology
  • AASU Journal of History review of Ecology
  • New Southerner poetry review: Southeastern Landscape finds its Mary Oliver
  • Reviews for Pinhook on Chelsea Green's site
  • Interviews
  • WGVU Interview
  • Janisse Ray on "Earthworms" KDHX-FM
  • Janisse Ray on "Your Call" KALW-FM
  • The Southern Nature Project: To Protect and Uphold Life
  • Articles
  • Like the Dew - Janisse Ray Expands on Cracker Ecology
  • Keene Writer in Residence Article
  • Middlebury Reporter in Residence
  • The Southern Register – Georgia Author, Naturalist Named Grisham Writer in Residence
  • The New Georgia Encyclopedia - Janisse Ray
  • Maddux News Wire – Ecology of a Cracker Childhood Depicts Naturalist Janisse Ray’s Journey of Environmental Awareness
  • Gainesville Times – Author and Environmentalist Janisse Ray Says Imagination Needed to Save Planet

Price: $17.95
Format: Paperback
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