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Book Data

ISBN: 9781603585576
Year Added to Catalog: 2014
Book Format: Hardcover
Dimensions: 6 x 9
Number of Pages: 240
Book Publisher: Chelsea Green
Release Date: August 8, 2014
Web Product ID: 814

Also By This Author

Carbon Shock

A Tale of Risk and Calculus on the Front Lines of the Disrupted Global Economy

by Mark Schapiro

Reviews, Interviews and Articles

  • “The costs of climate change are often talked about in terms of the loss of human life and environmental degradation, but the unprecedented amount of carbon in the atmosphere also has massive implications for the world economy. And when it comes to large companies that pollute and the governments that have the responsibility to regulate them, economic factors like those Mark Schapiro documents in Carbon Shock shouldn’t be overlooked. A journalist with a strong track record on the subject matter, Schapiro takes an in-depth look at this specific aspect of climate change. He does an excellent job of explaining a complicated web of interconnected economic impacts, from the way carbon offsets and credits function to how commodities from food to finance to fuel are already being affected, and how some businesses are trying to limit their risk. (…) Perhaps the strongest part of the book is Schapiro’s thorough coverage of the cap-and-trade approach, as he documents the history of carbon exchanges and clearly lays out the pros and cons of a system where industries buy the right to further pollute, and where the same challenges of any commodities market—from theft to artificial price manipulation—apply. Schapiro explains these economic issues in an accessible way, shows approaches with varying degrees of success, and adds to the evidence that numerous industries will soon have to reckon with how best to pay monetary costs as well as environmental ones.”

    Foreword Reviews

  • “In this thought-provoking work, journalist Schapiro (Exposed: The Toxic Chemistry of Everyday Products) tackles the question: 'What are the costs of climate change?' In search of an answer, he embarks on a multi-year investigation that sends him across the globe. To humanize the issue, Schapiro traces the carbon footprint he leaves through such trips as a flight to Siberia, visits to the biggest commercial nursery west of the Mississippi and to Manchester (England's former textiles center), and a tour of Guangzhou, 'one of the top ten carbon-emitting provinces in a country that is itself the leading emitter.' One of the most affecting chapters recounts how an oil spill from the tanker Prestige along the coast of Galicia in 2002 devastated a nearby town's economy and cost billions in cleanup expenses. Along the way, Schapiro assesses the response from multinational corporations and governments, asserting that they don't sufficiently quantify these costs–or worse, hide them, with the help of compromised auditors. While not a deeply scientific or academic examination, Schapiro‘s tough look at how our current habits of consumption will cost us down the road, combined with his hard-hitting, journalistic style, makes for a dramatic read.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • “Journalist Schapiro (Exposed) offers a highly readable explanation of the impacts of climate change on everyday life and of public policies that attempt to embed costs associated with carbon emissions into prices, including cap-and-trade and carbon taxes. His argument for such policies is economic rather than moralistic, based on a straightforward application of the economic concept of externalized costs. Where Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth made a strong case for action against climate change, Schapiro’s focus is on the practicalities of placing a price on carbon. His account of the vulnerabilities of carbon markets to fraud and manipulation is especially compelling. However, more insight into the factors that determine whether the costs of such policies fall on producers or consumers would have strengthened the book’s final chapter. While Schapiro is writing from a U.S. perspective, his points are drawn from a wide range of global examples of both climate change impacts and environmental policies. –VERDICT Recommended for readers interested in a nontechnical introduction to the rationale for, and some of the likely consequences of, economic approaches to reducing greenhouse gas emissions.”

    Library Journal

  • “Environmental journalist Schapiro (Exposed: The Toxic Chemistry of Everyday Products and What's at Stake for American Power, 2007) investigates the costs of our greenhouse-gas binge from new economic angles and new axes of geopolitical power. 'We can no longer rely on past events to predict future probabilities,' writes the author. 'The ground is shifting beneath our feet.' Schapiro explores the many costs of climate change: heat waves, lower rainfall in dry areas, torrential rain in wet areas, floods, refugees, public health impacts as diseases once limited to the tropics move north and south. 'Follow all those many circuits of production, follow the trails of greenhouse gasses rising into the atmosphere, and you will ultimately land upon each of us,' he writes, 'making our choices about what we consume and from where.' This is not breaking new ground, but Schapiro is particularly sharp in pointing to the elephant in the room, and not just because it is producing a great deal of methane. The costs of climate change are borne by the commons in the form of such practices as federally guaranteed insurance coverage, but most egregiously, the 'emitters of greenhouses gases get a free ride [in the U.S.]....This is known as asymmetric risk, a fine term of the financial arts that means that the public bears the risks while fossil fuels users earn the profits.' Schapiro covers a good number of projects to cut down on emissions (such as buying forests to sequester carbon dioxide, then selling that use to polluters), though we will all have to pay for pulling in the greenhouse reins, especially through the use of taxes as punitive disincentives to fossil fuel abuse and as a way to fund research into alternative energy sources. In this finely tuned study, Schapiro has some good news: Even the most fitful international negotiations admit that greenhouse gases come with a cost that must be paid.

    Kirkus Reviews

More Reviews

Reviews and Articles from Mark Schapiro's previous book Exposed


Price: $26.00
Format: Hardcover
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Mark Schapiro's Upcoming Events

  • Mark Schapiro at Columbia University
    Columbia University, NYC NY
    February 4, 2015, 12:00 pm

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