Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

What Joel Salatin Said, AKA Farmers Rock

How do we go about curbing one of the most egregious sources of greenhouse gases (namely methane) to foul our atmosphere? A lot of farmers will disagree with me, but the first thing we must do is eat less meat. As a society, we must make the decision to greatly reduce our consumption of animals for the sake of the continued survival of our species.

The second thing we must do is change from an industrial assembly-line approach to a more humane, natural approach that mimics nature and shows respect for the animal, for the land, for the worker, and, ultimately, for the eater. To that end, the Joel Salatin model of iconoclastic farming is clearly the model for a sustainable future, hands down.

Salatin gave a presentation at a college recently about the problems with the modern industrial food supply, and the remedy for our broken system.

From Local Nourishment:

Joel Salatin came to a local college for a speaking engagement this week. It was a wonderful evening. He brought a slide show, answered questions and had so much to say that I can’t begin to remember it all, despite taking notes! Kate, animal lover and nutrition student, came with me.

The comment Mr. Salatin made that totally hushed the audience (with the exception of a few awestruck, “Wow”s) was:

“Every bit of the alleged science linking methane and cows to global warming is based on annual cropping, feedlots and herbivore abuse. It all crumbles if the production model becomes like our mob-stocking-herbivorous-solar-conversion-lignified-carbon-sequestration fertilization. America has traded 73 million bison requiring no petroleum, machinery or fertilizer for 45 million beef cattle, and we think we’re efficient. At Polyface, we practice biomimicry and have returned to those lush, high organic matter production models of the native herbivores. If every cow producer in the country would use this model, in less than 10 years we would sequester all the carbon that’s been emitted since the beginning of the industrial age.”

It really is a “Wow” statement. I’ve been quoting it in comments to all the “Red meat is destroying the planet!” news articles I can find. Stop and think about that for a moment: Raising beef cattle with biomimicry can stop global warming in its tracks almost singlehandedly. Wow, indeed.

Read the whole article here.

 

Related Articles:

 
Photo: Joel Salatin by geoffandsherry, on Flickr


New French edition of The Resilient Farm and Homestead available

Great news for French-speaking fans of Ben Falk’s The Resilient Farm and Homestead: An Innovative Permaculture and Whole Systems Design Approach. The French language translation is now available from Imagine Un Colibri, from French booksellers, and on Amazon.fr. Falk’s book is a technical manual that details the strategies he and his team have developed for […] Read More

How to Make Biochar

Doing some spring cleaning around your property? By making biochar from brush and other hard-to-compost organic material, you can improve soil—it enhances nutrient availability and also enables soil to retain nutrients longer. This excerpt from The New Farmer’s Almanac, Volume 3, explains how to get started. To make biochar right in your garden, start by […] Read More

Generosity as Activism, and Other Homesteading Principles to Live By

“Like everyone I know, we occasionally find ourselves faced with a decision to which there is no obvious answer,” says Ben Hewitt, coauthor of The Nourishing Homestead. “Do we borrow money to build a bigger barn, or do we keep getting by with what we have? Do we spend our meager savings on trees and […] Read More

Pass the Walnut Syrup?

Everyone knows and loves maple syrup, and in some states (like Chelsea Green’s home state of Vermont), it’s big business. However, it’s a widespread myth that maples are the only trees that can be tapped to produce sap, according to Michael Farrell, sugarmaker and director of Cornell University’s Uihlein Forest. Sap can also be collected […] Read More

4 Books for Growing Food in Winter

Don’t let cold weather stop you from producing and enjoying your own food. For many, the coming of winter simply means cultivation moves indoors or under cover. Small farmers, homesteaders, home gardeners, and commercial growers can extend the growing season with techniques outlined in these essential books. There’s no need for urbanites and small-space dwellers […] Read More
Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com
+1
Tweet
Share
Share
Pin