Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

What Does My Garden Have To Do With Climate Change?

Yes, spending time in your garden can be a rather large contributor to climate change. Yeah, I know. Total bummer. But there are certain methods of keeping a garden that can be resource-intensive and actually harmful to the environment—even if you have the best of environmental intentions. Amanda Cuthbert and Jon Clift, authors of Climate Change: Simple Things You Can Do to Make a Difference, want to encourage you to garden the right way. The following tips will lower your carbon footprint in the garden so that you can do good really well. The following is an excerpt from Climate Change:
  • Go organic — feed your soil with natural fertilizers, e.g., horse manure or compost. Feed your plants with natural fertilizer, e.g., seaweed extract.
  • Use natural pest controls: for example, spray a mixture made with water and an eco-friendly dishwashing liquid on aphids.
  • Use a watering can rather than a sprinkler or hose — you will use less water.
  • Collect the rainwater from your roof in a rain barrel (or two).
  • Retain moisture in your soil by mulching around the base of plants. You can make a mulch using organic materials such as manure, hay, or straw, a thin layer of grass cuttings, or locally produced bark or wood chips.
  • Plant close together to conserve water in the soil.
  • Choose drought-resistant plants, flowers, and shrubs that positively enjoy dry, hot conditions, such as evening primrose, buddleia, rockrose, thyme, and lavender.
For more tips, check out the Climate Change book preview! Related Posts:

We are Farmily: Everyday Life on Sole Food Street Farm

Food is the medium. The message is nourishment in its most elemental and spiritual form.That’s how author Michael Ableman sees the role of Sole Food Street Farm and the food it sells to markets, restaurants, and individuals.In the following excerpt from his new book, Street Farm: Growing Food, Jobs, and Hope on the Urban Frontier, […] Read More

Who Produces More Eggs: Ducks or Chickens?

During our monthlong focus on homesteading in September, we received a number of great questions with several of them centered on … ducks and chickens.Here is one such question that came in via Facebook:“I have read that ducks produce more eggs over a longer lifetime of productivity than chickens, but recently talked with a farmer […] Read More

From Farm-to-Table to Farm-to-Everything

No longer restricted to the elite segments of society, the farm-to-table movement now reaches a wide spectrum of Americans from hospital and office cafeterias to elementary schools and fast-casual restaurants.Nearly a century ago, the idea of “local food” would have seemed perplexing, since virtually all food was local. Today, most of the food consumed in […] Read More

The Three Cs of Farm-to-School

Most people know about the three “R’s” – reading, writing, and arithmetic. But, have you heard about the three “C’s”?If you, or your kid, is at a school that takes part in the Farm-to-School movement, then you may already know about them.October is National Farm-to-School month, and in their book Farm to Table, authors Darryl […] Read More

Homesteading: Highlighting Our Need For Each Other

Homesteading isn’t meant to be a solitary adventure, or done in isolation.Building and living on the independent farmstead takes at least one partner, if not several. That’s the advice of authors Shawn and Beth Dougherty. In their book The Independent Farmstead, The Sow’s Ear model for regenerating the land and growing food covers everything from […] Read More
Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By