Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

What Does My Cooking Have To Do with Climate Change?

The following is an excerpt from Climate Change: Simple Things You Can Do to Make a Difference by Amanda Cuthbert and Jon Clift. It has been adapted for the web.
  • When you use natural gas or propane to cook with, carbon dioxide (CO2) is produced; this is the main cause of climate change.
  • When you use electricity to cook with, the power plant burned coal, gas, or oil to produce that electricity — emitting CO2 in the process.
What can I do about it?
  • Cut food into small pieces before cooking — it will cook more quickly.
  • Select the correct saucepan size for the heating element or gas flame.
  • Put a lid on top of the pan when you can; your meal will cook much more quickly and you won’t be wasting energy.
  • Turn down the heat when a saucepan comes to a boil. You don’t need as much heat to keep a pot boiling as you do to get it to boil, and the contents will cook just as quickly.
  • Only use sufficient water to cover vegetables when cooking them in saucepans.
  • Use a steamer for vegetables — you can cook two or three vegetables on one element or gas ring.
  • Consider using a pressure cooker for cooking some foods — it reduces cooking times dramatically.
  • Make one-pot meals that only need one element or gas ring.
  • Use your oven efficiently by filling up as much of the space as possible.
  • If you’re cooking a meal in the oven, don’t be tempted to keep on opening the oven door to see how it’s all going, as you lose a lot of heat doing this.
If you do just one thing: When boiling water, use only as much as you need. Related Posts:


Q&A with Pascal Baudar: The New Wildcrafted Cuisine

A Q&A with Pascal Baudar, author of The New Wildcrafted Cuisine: Exploring the Exotic Gastronomy of Local Terroir Go foraging with master forager Pascal Baudar this Spring! The School of the New American Farmstead at Sterling College presents a 2-week intensive course on Foraging and Wildcrafting. Learn to identify, process, preserve, cook, and EAT the […] Read More

RECIPE: Grilled Nopalitos for Cinco de Mayo

From The Occidental Arts and Ecology Center Cookbook Native to Mexico and prevalent throughout the Southwest and California, the prickly pear or nopal cactus, Opuntia ficus-indica, is a stunning drought-hearty landscaping plant, natural barbed-wire fence, and a source of nutritious food – both pads and fruit are edible. Inside the prickly pads lies a cooling, […] Read More

Ask the Experts: Submit Your Permaculture Questions Now

Attention all growers, food-lovers, and green-living enthusiasts, we are once again celebrating Permaculture Month by putting our pioneering permaculture authors to work for you.Chelsea Green is proud to publish and distribute some of the most recognized, and award-winning, names in permaculture, and we’re making several of them available to our readers to answer any and all […] Read More

Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation – Review in Small Farm Canada Magazine

This review was originally published in Small Farm Canada, Volume 12, Issue 5, September/October 2015If you could have only one book on mushroom production…Review by Janet WallaceTradd Cotter‘s book, Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation, is a masterpiece. I have long been interested in growing mushrooms and have read several books on the topic. This book, […] Read More

Hands-On Learning: School of The New American Farmstead

This summer, twelve of our authors (plus Chelsea Green’s own President and Publisher) will be leading hands-on intensive courses at Sterling College in Craftsbury, Vermont.These workshops, classes, and certifications will inspire you, equip you with marketable skills, and provide you with new perspectives on integrated, community-centered farming and food production.Engage your SensesThe hands-on courses will […] Read More
Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com