Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

Washington Post Praises the Wonders of Fermented Foods, and Sandor Ellix Katz!

After tuning in to David Gumpert’s blog about the recent madness surrounding raw milk and other raw foods, it’s refreshing to find some mainstream media coverage that focuses on the deliciousness and benefits of fermentation and friendly bacteria.

As usual, author Sandor Ellix Katz and his essential cookbook Wild Fermentation are given the praise they deserve, and other “fermentation fetishists” in the DC area are highlighted. Lovely photos accompany the article on the Washington Post’s website.

By Kristen Hinman

Special to The Washington Post Tuesday, September 14, 2010; 10:14 AM Friendly bacteria might not be an easy notion to wrap your brain around in the context of food these days. Monica Corrado says bring ’em on. And she’s not the only one. Pack raw food into a jar, then seal it to keep out air, says the Takoma Park teacher of lactofermentation. Leave at room temperature and let feisty, naturally occurring microbes go to town for several days or even weeks. Open. Taste. Feast. To see Corrado lick her lips after lapping up some of her “live” homemade ketchup, to watch her eyes dance as she opens a jar of her bubbling salsa and, yes, to taste her hissing peach chutney, redolent with crushed red pepper, is to concede that she might be on to something. Part science, part art, lactofermentation is an ancient method of food preservation using live bacterial cultures. Anathema though it may seem to a generation of antibacterial hand-gel obsessives, the technique is increasingly being embraced by DIY aficionados and whole-food advocates who like the idea of low-tech preservation and also believe that unpasteurized foods aid digestion and boost immunity. As Corrado puts it, “We’re live people. We’re not meant to eat only dead food!” … “I would say 99.999 percent of people in the United States eat fermented foods every single day,” says Sandor Ellix Katz, author of “Wild Fermentation” (Chelsea Green, 2003). “Bread, cheese, yogurt, sour cream, coffee, tea, chocolate, salami: Many everyday foods are produced by microorganisms and fermentation. Even though it mostly takes place behind factory doors, where nobody has to think about the fact that it’s the cultivation of bacteria that are enabling these foods to grace our table, there they are, everywhere.”
Read the entire article here… Check out Wild Fermentation in our bookstore, and in just a few weeks we’ll also have available a DVD of one of Sandor’s popular fermentation workshops. Watch a trailer in the bookstore!


Recipe: Fast Ricotta Cheese

Making cheese at home may seem like a time and labor-intensive process, but what if you could make a delicious, high-quality cheese in about one hour? According to David Asher, author of The Art of Natural Cheesemaking, you can. This version of ricotta is made by adding acidity to sweet whey in the form of lemon […] Read More

Q&A with Pascal Baudar: The New Wildcrafted Cuisine

A Q&A with Pascal Baudar, author of The New Wildcrafted Cuisine: Exploring the Exotic Gastronomy of Local Terroir Go foraging with master forager Pascal Baudar this Spring! The School of the New American Farmstead at Sterling College presents a 2-week intensive course on Foraging and Wildcrafting. Learn to identify, process, preserve, cook, and EAT the […] Read More

RECIPE: Grilled Nopalitos for Cinco de Mayo

From The Occidental Arts and Ecology Center Cookbook Native to Mexico and prevalent throughout the Southwest and California, the prickly pear or nopal cactus, Opuntia ficus-indica, is a stunning drought-hearty landscaping plant, natural barbed-wire fence, and a source of nutritious food – both pads and fruit are edible. Inside the prickly pads lies a cooling, […] Read More

Ask the Experts: Submit Your Permaculture Questions Now

Attention all growers, food-lovers, and green-living enthusiasts, we are once again celebrating Permaculture Month by putting our pioneering permaculture authors to work for you.Chelsea Green is proud to publish and distribute some of the most recognized, and award-winning, names in permaculture, and we’re making several of them available to our readers to answer any and all […] Read More

Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation – Review in Small Farm Canada Magazine

This review was originally published in Small Farm Canada, Volume 12, Issue 5, September/October 2015If you could have only one book on mushroom production…Review by Janet WallaceTradd Cotter‘s book, Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation, is a masterpiece. I have long been interested in growing mushrooms and have read several books on the topic. This book, […] Read More
Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com