Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

The Book Lady celebrates Chelsea Green

Cathy (“The Book Lady”) Langer of Denver’s Tattered Cover bookstore writes a monthly column over at, and this month she chose to celebrate yours truly by highlighting some of her favorite gardening and food books from Chelsea Green! Have a look at the article, below.

April is the cruellest month, breeding
Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
Memory and desire, stirring
Dull roots with spring rain.
Winter kept us warm, covering Earth in forgetful snow, feeding
A little life with dried tubers.

With a nod to APRIL IS POETRY MONTH and gratitude to T.S. Eliot for penning the masterpiece, The Waste Land, I must go in a different direction.

I love April. It’s all about the warming of earth in the best way: thawing, sprouting, greening, wormy, wet and fertile. April 22 is Earth Day, a celebration of Mother Earth and all that she gives and a reminder that we must cherish our planet and take care of our natural resources. April is the perfect time to celebrate a wonderful publishing house that brings to our shelves books that embody the hallmark and mission of Earth Day, not to mention books that delight the senses and appeal to our inner foodie.

Chelsea Green, based in White River Junction, Vermont, was founded in 1985 and for 26 years has been the publishing leader for books on the politics and practice of sustainable living. We love selling Chelsea Green books because they are beautifully produced in an environmentally mindful way. And sometimes a little on the quirky side, thought provoking and also often very practical. Their gardening books are superb. One of my favorites is The New Food Garden: Growing Beyond the Vegetable Garden by Frank Tozer. This comprehensive, user friendly volume tells you all you need to know about creating a successful home garden that is “efficient, beautiful and produces an abundance of food with a minimum of work and resources.” Tozer’s inspiration springs from peasant gardeners around the world. His philosophy of gardening is compelling and the book itself is fun to peruse, so all of you armchair gardeners will enjoy it, too. If you want to have a home garden but space is an issue I suggest you take a look at Fresh Food from Small Spaces: The Square Inch Gardener’s Guide to Year Round Growing, Fermenting and Sprouting by R.J. Ruppenthal. It shows you how to transform your balconies and windowsills into productive space. How about chickens on your patio? Then, of course, there’s the matter of fertilizing your garden. That’s where Holy Sh*t: Managing Manure to Save Mankind by Gene Logsdon comes in to play. Farmer Logsdon is passionate about manure, according to him our greatest and most misunderstood natural resource. Weighing in on the eternal debate over the global impact of meat consumption, Meat: A Benign Extravagance by Simon Fairlie offers a groundbreaking argument for meat production as a crucial part of a sustainable, small-scale holistic farming system. Important food for thought, but I don’t recommend pasturing a steer on your patio. And then, for those of you who appreciate the slow food, farm to table philosophy but like to participate at the consumption level, Chelsea Green is distributing a beautiful volume produced by Slow Food Editore of Italy, The Slow Food Dictionary to Italian Regional Cooking. It is a great resource from the originators of the movement. Comprehensive, beautifully illustrated, with insights not only about Italian cooking but its people, language, history and culture. Boun appetito! Happy gardening. Love your Mother(earth). Reprinted with permission of Cathy Langer and

A Simple Way to Grow Fresh Greens Indoors This Winter

Just because the temperatures have started to drop doesn’t mean you have to live without fresh greens until next Spring. With author and gardener Peter Burke’s innovative method of growing soil sprouts indoors, you can grow nutrient-dense greens all year long at a fraction of the cost of buying at market. Burke’s new book, Year-Round Indoor Salad […] Read More..

A Day in the Life of a Homesteader

As Homesteading Month comes to a close, we take a look at what it means to live the homesteading life every day. Read through the question and answer below and be sure to check out any of the previous articles you might have missed:Why Acquiring Land Presents a Challenge for New Homesteaders Homesteading Q&A: Solutions […] Read More..

Go Lean: How To Eliminate Waste and Increase Efficiency on the Farm

Using the words “factory” and “farm” in the same sentence may seem sacrilegious, but today’s young farmers like author Ben Hartman are discovering that the same sound business practices apply whether you produce cars or carrots.In his new book The Lean Farm, Hartman demonstrates how applying lean principles—originally developed by the Japanese automotive industry—to farming practices […] Read More..

Why Acquiring Land Presents a Challenge for New Homesteaders

More and more often, young people are turning away from cities and urban life in order to live off the land and even start farms of their own. But while many have the desire to grow food for themselves and/or others, acquiring land, and the financial burden that comes with it, presents a difficult challenge […] Read More..

How to Distinguish Permaculture from Natural Farming

Just what are the differences between permaculture and natural farming? How are they connected, and where do they diverge in philosophy and principle?Those questions are answered in the following excerpt that is adapted from the newly released One-Straw Revolutionary, a book that delves into the philosophy and work of Japanese farmer and philosopher Masanobu Fukuoka […] Read More..