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Scared of slave-harvested candy? Try reverse trick-or-treating!

Just a brief Halloween post for all you goblins and ghouls out there. There’s a new trend hitting the streets, and its aim is to educate! No longer must your bedsheet-covered toddler stand idly by and accept the tasty but unethical sweets foisted upon him or her on Halloween night by well-meaning but ignorant adults. No, this year your little ghostlet can do something to show how much he cares about his fellow young ‘uns in the tropics. He can give those adults a piece of his mind by giving them a delectable piece of fair-trade candy in exchange for their cheap slave-labor Hershey bar…(and don’t worry, my etiquette rulebook clearly states that tact is essentially equal in value to delicious chocolate, thereby making this exchange neutral on the tact-o-meter). Read this article from Grist to find out what it’s all about:
For most of us, Halloween has a strong association with candy. When you’re little, you get to dress up and run around your neighborhood collecting it for free. When you’re a bit older, you get to dress up, get drunk, and buy it steeply discounted on Nov. 1. And when you’re a parent, you get to supervise kids on their candy-collecting mission, and sneak some after bedtime. Along with all this candy is the sense that, however old you get, Halloween signals a brief return to innocence. Well, here’s news that might clear the mist from your eyes and leave a bitter taste in your mouth (and not the good, super-dark-chocolate kind): Your Halloween candy is keeping the child slave trade in Africa alive. About half of the chocolate eaten in the U.S. comes from the Ivory Coast, where documented instances of forced child labor on cocoa farms persist despite a decade of pressure on chocolate companies to implement better oversight. And because corporations like Hershey’s (which has recently been found to be exploiting workers here in the U.S., too) and Cadbury manufacture their products using beans from all over the world that get mixed together, it’s highly likely that any chocolate bar you unwrap is made with at least some cacao grown by underage workers with little in the way of rights or compensation. The U.S. State Department estimated that over 100,000 children work on Ivory Coast cocoa farms, and 10,000 of those could be victims of trafficking or enslavement, said Kelsie Evans, chocolate products coordinator for Equal Exchange, a fair trade co-op. A Knight-Ridder investigation in 2001 first gave the issue wide exposure, portraying the lives of boys as young as nine, who perform the backbreaking work of harvesting cocoa beans, while receiving beatings, inadequate meals, and little or no pay in return. Public pressure after the revelation led to the creation of the Harkin-Engel Protocol [PDF], which major chocolate companies signed in a pledge to create, by 2005, some kind of certification system to avoid exploiting child labor. But the deadline’s been delayed again and again, as companies have pushed back to weaken the protocol and hold up what Evans calls “token efforts” to demonstrate progress. “They’ve long claimed that certification transparency is not possible, or [they] can’t verify what’s happening on the ground,” says Evans. “But I think what Equal Exchange and other fair trade companies have shown is that you can [verify it].” Equal Exchange sources organic cacao beans from small-scale family farming cooperatives in Latin America. And, while Evans acknowledged that it would require a transition period for a large chocolate company to change its practices, she pointed out that there’s currently an abundance of farmers with fair-trade ingredients to sell.

So what can you do to spread the word about Big Chocolate’s dirty secret? Boycotting Halloween would be a major buzzkill — and might actually hurt more than it would help. “It’s definitely a heavy, scary topic that is not as much fun to talk about for a product that’s seen as such a source of joy,” Evans said. That’s why Equal Exchange has teamed up with human rights organization Global Exchange to promote the fifth annual Reverse Trick-or-Treating campaign, which invites families to trick-or-treat as usual, but hand back small fair-trade chocolates in exchange for their loot — a simple public awareness campaign with added power because the message comes from children whose peers on the other side of the world are enduring a real-life hardship.
“It’s a creative way to approach a big, complex, and depressing problem,” adds Evans.
The article continues over at
If candy’s not your thing, take this opportunity to learn about another essential nutrient: coffee!
“In each cup of coffee we drink the major issues of the twenty-first century—globalization, immigration, women’s rights, pollution, indigenous rights, and self-determination—are played out in villages and remote areas around the world. In Javatrekker: Dispatches from the World of Fair Trade Coffee, a unique hybrid of Fair Trade business, adventure travel, and cultural anthropology, author Dean Cycon brings readers face-to-face with the real people who make our morning coffee ritual possible.” Check out Javatrekker today.

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