Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

Pre-Release Special: Top-Bar Beekeeping!

Beekeeping is all the buzz these days. Honey loving people are setting up hives in backyards, on rooftops, and empty lots. Even our first lady, Michele Obama, has bees in the White House kitchen garden!

Most of the hives you see are the boxy industrial sort, and these are usually fitted with plastic sheets that guide the bees’ comb-making into straightforward, rational, flat, and easy-to use shapes. They’re perfect for the commercial production of honey, but bees aren’t made to build that way. Left to their own devices they’ll build combs in rounded, fractal shapes — and a new movement in beekeeping says that’s the healthiest way they can do it, and may help thwart colony collapse disorder. Our new book, Top-Bar Beekeeping: Organic Practices for Honeybee Health, explains the why and how of this innovative hive design, and to celebrate it’s arrival we’ve put it on sale for 25% off until September 27.
“This is an excellent guide for hobby beekeepers who wish to keep bees using top-bar hives. Drawing on his more than 30 years of beekeeping experience in New Mexico, author Les Crowder describes in detail the special comb management techniques that this low-cost, but relatively intensive, form of beekeeping requires. Top-Bar Beekeeping also provides an eloquent appeal for beekeepers to make, care, respect, and revere the foundation of their relationships with the bees.”  —Thomas D. Seeley, Cornell University; author of Honeybee Democracy and The Wisdom of the Hive
With full-color photos throughout, plus charts to explain key concepts, Top-Bar Beekeeping will take you from building your first hive, to caring for your swarm, harvesting honey, and putting that extra beeswax to good use. Get a copy this week, and save 25%!

We are Farmily: Everyday Life on Sole Food Street Farm

Food is the medium. The message is nourishment in its most elemental and spiritual form.That’s how author Michael Ableman sees the role of Sole Food Street Farm and the food it sells to markets, restaurants, and individuals.In the following excerpt from his new book, Street Farm: Growing Food, Jobs, and Hope on the Urban Frontier, […] Read More

Who Produces More Eggs: Ducks or Chickens?

During our monthlong focus on homesteading in September, we received a number of great questions with several of them centered on … ducks and chickens.Here is one such question that came in via Facebook:“I have read that ducks produce more eggs over a longer lifetime of productivity than chickens, but recently talked with a farmer […] Read More

From Farm-to-Table to Farm-to-Everything

No longer restricted to the elite segments of society, the farm-to-table movement now reaches a wide spectrum of Americans from hospital and office cafeterias to elementary schools and fast-casual restaurants.Nearly a century ago, the idea of “local food” would have seemed perplexing, since virtually all food was local. Today, most of the food consumed in […] Read More

The Three Cs of Farm-to-School

Most people know about the three “R’s” – reading, writing, and arithmetic. But, have you heard about the three “C’s”?If you, or your kid, is at a school that takes part in the Farm-to-School movement, then you may already know about them.October is National Farm-to-School month, and in their book Farm to Table, authors Darryl […] Read More

Homesteading: Highlighting Our Need For Each Other

Homesteading isn’t meant to be a solitary adventure, or done in isolation.Building and living on the independent farmstead takes at least one partner, if not several. That’s the advice of authors Shawn and Beth Dougherty. In their book The Independent Farmstead, The Sow’s Ear model for regenerating the land and growing food covers everything from […] Read More
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