Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

Investing Your Money Where Your Mouth Is

When it comes to bailing out small family farms, restaurants that buy only local produce, or struggling cheesemakers, Uncle Sam isn’t in much of a hurry. Those guys aren’t too big to fail. They won’t wipe out your pension fund or bankrupt a school system. They won’t tank the global economy.

But for socially responsible investors, that’s a feature, not a bug. The Slow Money movement is a way for investors to connect with their money, to see the physical fruits (sometimes literally) of their investments. It’s a way to invest in the future.


Fed up with the stock market? Sick of greedy megabanks and Wall Street bailouts? Then take your money and invest in what you eat. That’s the idea behind slow money, a movement coming into its own at a time when interest in local food is rising and exasperation over a global financial system gone wild is high.

Slow money is named after the slow food movement that developed to counteract our fast food, eat-on-the-go society. Championed by Woody Tasch, a venture capitalist, slow money is Tasch’s antidote to what he calls fast money — “money that is disconnected from people and place and so is zooming around the planet invested in very complicated, large-scale, distant things,” he explained. Slow money “is the opposite, investing in things that are close to home, that you understand, where you can know what your money is doing.”

Right now, slow money is focused on investing in local food enterprises — the organic farmer, the restaurant that uses local ingredients, the neighborhood microbrewery. But there’s no reason why the slow money principles couldn’t be transferred to other local ventures — your neighborhood news source, your independent retailers, local energy sources, you name it.

Read the whole article here.


Related Articles:

The End of Stationarity

Welcome to the End … of Stationarity. And what is “stationarity”? We’re glad you asked.Scientists have devised a new term to explain the turmoil caused by climate change: the end of stationarity. It means that our baselines for rainfall, water flow, temperature, and extreme weather are no longer relevant—that making predictions based on past experience […] Read More

We are Farmily: Everyday Life on Sole Food Street Farm

Food is the medium. The message is nourishment in its most elemental and spiritual form.That’s how author Michael Ableman sees the role of Sole Food Street Farm and the food it sells to markets, restaurants, and individuals.In the following excerpt from his new book, Street Farm: Growing Food, Jobs, and Hope on the Urban Frontier, […] Read More

Bullshit. *Charisma, Icon, Intelligence, Empty Sandwich

How does the word “bullshit” connect to Charisma, Intelligence and the notion of The Empty Sandwich?To find out the answer to this question we meandered through David Fleming’s Lean Logic. A dictionary unlike any other, Lean Logic encourages readers to actively and intellectually engage with its entries. These entries are often cross-referenced so that you […] Read More

From Farm-to-Table to Farm-to-Everything

No longer restricted to the elite segments of society, the farm-to-table movement now reaches a wide spectrum of Americans from hospital and office cafeterias to elementary schools and fast-casual restaurants.Nearly a century ago, the idea of “local food” would have seemed perplexing, since virtually all food was local. Today, most of the food consumed in […] Read More

The Three Cs of Farm-to-School

Most people know about the three “R’s” – reading, writing, and arithmetic. But, have you heard about the three “C’s”?If you, or your kid, is at a school that takes part in the Farm-to-School movement, then you may already know about them.October is National Farm-to-School month, and in their book Farm to Table, authors Darryl […] Read More
Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By