Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

Now Available: Passive Solar Architecture!

We’ve been awaiting the release of this book for a long time! Solar pioneers David Bainbridge and Ken Haggard have put together a monumental book on how buildings can use the power of the sun for heating, cooling, lighting, and more. At long last, Passive Solar Architecture: Heating, Cooling, Ventilation, Daylighting, and More Using Natural Flows is available in our bookstore.

From a review in Sustainable Industries:

Passive Solar Architecture: Heating, cooling, ventilation, daylighting and more using natural flows, demonstrates how integrated design can create buildings that are more healthful, comfortable, quiet, secure, lovely, economical, and use 80-90% less energy than buildings commonly constructed today. Of the many residential and commercial buildings exhibited in the book, author and architect, Ken Haggard, is probably most proud of this Congregation Beth David Synagogue in San Luis Obispo, which uses 82% less energy than the state’s restrictive energy code allows and cost no more than a conventional building. Haggard notes that most of the techniques are common sense and proven, in some cases for more than 2000 years, and that a range of subsidies, perverse incentives, ignorance and foolishness have led most planners, architects, designers, developers and builders to ignore these simple strategies. The book shows how and why we can change to improve security, comfort, health, productivity in the workplace, and the economics of the built environment. These principles are important for any homebuilder, buyer, renter or business owner to understand. They can save energy, provide security during climate extremes like the ongoing heat wave, reduce costs for energy and medical care, and increase productivity. They can also improve learning and student outcomes in schools. Drawn from the coauthors’ and contributors’ decades of successful experience, Passive Solar Architecture is both inspiringly broad in scope and delightfully detailed. City and neighborhood planning is intermixed with many small gems—such as a metal water wall detail to capture winter sun—and examples in climates from around the world. According to John S. Reynolds, FAIA, Professor of Architecture Emeritus, University of Oregon, and Honorary Past Chair, American Solar Energy Society, ‘This is a welcome and unique resource for my university seminars in passive heating and cooling.’
Well worth the wait. Get your copy today!

Save Energy & Money This Winter: Seal Up Your Drafty House

Unless you’ve taken special preventative precautions, it’s likely that on cold days much of your house’s heat pours out through your (closed) windows. Most houses—especially old houses—have drafty, uninsulated windows that do little to prevent heat from dumping out into the cold night. Even if your windows aren’t drafty, the expensive heat your furnace has […] Read More..

The Limits to Growth and Greece: Systemic or Financial Collapse?

Could it be that the ongoing Greek collapse is a symptom of the more general collapse that the Limits to Growth model generates for the first two decades of the 21st century? Author Ugo Bardi (Extracted: How the Quest for Mineral Wealth is Plundering the Planet) examines the correlation between what is unfolding between Greece […] Read More..

Permaculture Q&A: Mulching Options for Your Garden

As Permaculture Month continues, we are making our expert authors available to answer your burning permaculture questions. If you have a question to submit, fill out this form. This week, Lottie from Florida asked if there are other garden mulch options that are as effective as hay. Josh Trought, one of our soil building and garden management […] Read More..

Designing Your Own Solar Cooker & Dehydrator

In today’s world, nearly everything we use, from phones and computers to cars and kitchen appliances, requires energy derived from fossil fuels. Wouldn’t it be nice to offset some of that energy use by harnessing the renewable power of the sun? Josh Trought, founder of D Acres—an educational center in New Hampshire that researches, applies, […] Read More..

Building a Sustainable Community: The D Acres Model

If you were going to create a community-based homestead or farm from scratch, where would you start? What building materials would you use? What crops would you grow and what animals would you raise? How would you develop an organizational structure and connect with your community? And, how would you make sure all of this […] Read More..
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