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National Gardening Association reviews The Resilient Gardener

Congratulations to Carol Deppe for this stellar endorsement of her new book, The Resilient Gardener, from the National Gardening Association. The following review ran in their national news bulletin last week.

Gardening for Hard Times

Gardening can be a way to connect with nature, enjoy delicious produce for much less than you’d pay at the market or experiment with heirloom varieties or the latest cutting-edge hybrids. But becoming a proficient gardener is also a way to increase your self-sufficiency and prepare for the rigors of hard times.

As author Carol Deppe, a long-time gardener with a PhD in biology and decades of experience in plant breeding and sustainable agriculture, explains in her new book, The Resilient Gardener: Food Production and Self-Reliance in Uncertain Times (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2010, $29.95), hard times can come in a variety of ways. Personal hard times may come in the form of drought, special dietary needs, job loss or lack of time. But they can also come as what she calls “mega hard times,” the result of man made or natural disasters that cause major disruptions in all aspects of society.

To help weather the personal hard times, Deppes’s book is filled with advice on ways to create a garden with the resiliency to withstand periods of minimal care or climatic challenges and still provide a secure source of healthful food. She also shows how gardening can help those dealing with dietary restrictions and allergies.

To prepare for the “mega hard times,” she provides advice on growing five crops on a small scale that could enable you to survive and feed yourself and your family, come what may. Potatoes, corn, beans, squash and eggs provide her foundation for a self-sufficient, nutritionally complete food supply. She deals with each of these crops in detail, covering varieties to choose, techniques for growing, harvesting, storing, and cooking, as well as seed saving.

There is also information on nutrition, along with advice on building soil fertility and watering plants in ways that are environmentally responsible and adaptable to regional conditions. Even if you’re not yet ready to begin preparing for the possibility of small or large scale disasters, this book contains so much good basic growing information that just about any gardener will find it helpful.

For more information on this book, go to: The Resilient Gardener.

Read the original review on The National Gardening Association website.


New French edition of The Resilient Farm and Homestead available

Great news for French-speaking fans of Ben Falk’s The Resilient Farm and Homestead: An Innovative Permaculture and Whole Systems Design Approach. The French language translation is now available from Imagine Un Colibri, from French booksellers, and on Amazon.fr. Falk’s book is a technical manual that details the strategies he and his team have developed for […] Read More

How to Make Biochar

Doing some spring cleaning around your property? By making biochar from brush and other hard-to-compost organic material, you can improve soil—it enhances nutrient availability and also enables soil to retain nutrients longer. This excerpt from The New Farmer’s Almanac, Volume 3, explains how to get started. To make biochar right in your garden, start by […] Read More

Generosity as Activism, and Other Homesteading Principles to Live By

“Like everyone I know, we occasionally find ourselves faced with a decision to which there is no obvious answer,” says Ben Hewitt, coauthor of The Nourishing Homestead. “Do we borrow money to build a bigger barn, or do we keep getting by with what we have? Do we spend our meager savings on trees and […] Read More

Pass the Walnut Syrup?

Everyone knows and loves maple syrup, and in some states (like Chelsea Green’s home state of Vermont), it’s big business. However, it’s a widespread myth that maples are the only trees that can be tapped to produce sap, according to Michael Farrell, sugarmaker and director of Cornell University’s Uihlein Forest. Sap can also be collected […] Read More

4 Books for Growing Food in Winter

Don’t let cold weather stop you from producing and enjoying your own food. For many, the coming of winter simply means cultivation moves indoors or under cover. Small farmers, homesteaders, home gardeners, and commercial growers can extend the growing season with techniques outlined in these essential books. There’s no need for urbanites and small-space dwellers […] Read More
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