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Lacto-Fermenting Vegetables…A Faster Way

The following is an excerpt from Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning by Gardeners & Farmers of Terre Vivante. This method, widely used in Japan, involves a special glass or plastic container (found in some macrobiotic health-food stores) that has a device for constantly pressing down the vegetables. The vegetables can usually be eaten after a few days of fermentation, and are not intended for long-term storage. Here are just two of the many possible recipes. Snow Peas and Cucumbers
  • ¼ lb. snow peas
  • 1 cucumber
  • Ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • A bit of sake (rice wine)
  • A bit of soy sauce
  • Seasoning to taste
  • Glass or plastic pressure jars
Remove the tough parts and string, but do not shell, the pea pods. Cook the peas for two to three minutes in hot water; then dip them immediately in cold water. Mix the drained peas with sliced cucumber. Put them in a pressure jar and press down. Eat with a dressing made separately, using the sake, soy sauce, ginger, and other seasonings. Eggplant and Chrysanthemum Petals
  • 1 lb. eggplant
  • ¼ lb. dried chrysanthemum petals
  • 2 or 3 whole cayenne peppers
  • 1 tablespoon kombu seaweed
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • Glass or plastic pressure jars
Slice the eggplant into ½-inch thick rounds, and let them dry in the sun for one day. Finely chop the peppers. Put the chrysanthemum petals at the bottom of the jar, and add salt. Layer, alternating two slices of eggplant with pieces of kombu seaweed, peppers, and salt, until all ingredients have been used. Press the mixture down firmly in the jar; loosen slightly once the liquid appears. The mixture will be ready to eat in two or three days. Keeping time is limited to about one week. —Michel Mangin, Aix-en-Provence


Recipe: Fast Ricotta Cheese

Making cheese at home may seem like a time and labor-intensive process, but what if you could make a delicious, high-quality cheese in about one hour? According to David Asher, author of The Art of Natural Cheesemaking, you can. This version of ricotta is made by adding acidity to sweet whey in the form of lemon […] Read More

Q&A with Pascal Baudar: The New Wildcrafted Cuisine

A Q&A with Pascal Baudar, author of The New Wildcrafted Cuisine: Exploring the Exotic Gastronomy of Local Terroir Go foraging with master forager Pascal Baudar this Spring! The School of the New American Farmstead at Sterling College presents a 2-week intensive course on Foraging and Wildcrafting. Learn to identify, process, preserve, cook, and EAT the […] Read More

RECIPE: Grilled Nopalitos for Cinco de Mayo

From The Occidental Arts and Ecology Center Cookbook Native to Mexico and prevalent throughout the Southwest and California, the prickly pear or nopal cactus, Opuntia ficus-indica, is a stunning drought-hearty landscaping plant, natural barbed-wire fence, and a source of nutritious food – both pads and fruit are edible. Inside the prickly pads lies a cooling, […] Read More

Ask the Experts: Submit Your Permaculture Questions Now

Attention all growers, food-lovers, and green-living enthusiasts, we are once again celebrating Permaculture Month by putting our pioneering permaculture authors to work for you.Chelsea Green is proud to publish and distribute some of the most recognized, and award-winning, names in permaculture, and we’re making several of them available to our readers to answer any and all […] Read More

Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation – Review in Small Farm Canada Magazine

This review was originally published in Small Farm Canada, Volume 12, Issue 5, September/October 2015If you could have only one book on mushroom production…Review by Janet WallaceTradd Cotter‘s book, Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation, is a masterpiece. I have long been interested in growing mushrooms and have read several books on the topic. This book, […] Read More
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