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Join the Pilgrimage to Polyface Farm with The Atlantic

Andrea Gabor of The Atlantic, joins crowds of farmers and tourists for a look at Joel Salatin’s pioneering “grass-farming” operation. Read her recent article to join in the pilgrimage. Reposted from The Atlantic.

Two weeks ago, I joined about 1,700 farmers, foodies, and families from across the U.S. for a pilgrimage to Joel Salatin’s Polyface Farm, home of his iconic model of local, sustainable agriculture.

Salatin, the high priest of “grass-farming,” as he defines his work, hosts a field day every three years on his 550-acre spread in Swope, Virginia, in the hills of the Shenandoah Valley. Visitors have come from as far away as Florida and Iowa to trudge through the thick, soft pastures and see how Salatin raises cows, chickens, pigs, rabbits, and poultry. It is a brilliant sunny day, warm already at 8 a.m. on a Saturday.

Walking up a gentle slope, we come upon a herd of cows “mobbed” under a shady canopy, nibbling grass and depositing patties of natural fertilizer in the acre-or-so where they have been herded for the day. Tomorrow the white plastic electric fence—so thin it is hard to see in the brilliant sunlight—will be moved, the cows transferred to a new paddock so they can feast on a fresh “salad bar.” Nearby, the chickens, in their big, floorless, corrugated tin-and-mesh mobile playpens are pecking at the cow patties left by the previous day’s mob, picking out the fly larvae, aiding the composting process. Like so much on the farm, it is a virtuous cycle, the cows and chickens working together to create the rich soil, grass, and insect ecosystem.

We cross over to a glen, where the pasture meets the forest: at about 400 acres, forest covers most of the property, which now supports three generations of Salatins, including Lucille, Joel’s widowed mother, who bought the land with her husband, William, in 1961. Here, more high-tech, hard-to-see fencing contains a herd of pigs, who are snuffling as they search for acorns, hickory nuts, grubs, and worms. “They disturb it, churn it up,” explains Salatin, for whom “disturbance” is the key to fertility and regeneration.It is also a good way to describe the mission of Salatin, who describes himself as a “Christian-libertarian-environmentalist-lunatic farmer”—one who rails against industrial agriculture and government, and proselytizes about reconnecting consumers and farmers. (“Polyface doesn’t participate in government programs,” has no mortgage, and eschews organic certification, says Salatin, a former journalist whose new book, Folks, This Ain’t Normal, is coming out this fall.)

Read the rest of Andrea Gabor’s article.

Check out Joel Salatin’s latest, The Sheer Ecstasy of Being a Lunatic Farmer.


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