Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

How to Deal with a Few Bad Apples

Watching helplessly as a fungus starts to take over your orchard can be a frustrating, even heartbreaking, experience—whether you have two trees or two hundred.

Apple scab is a fairly common blight. Even professional apple growers have to deal with it. What do you do when you see those telltale little round greenish spots? Barbara Damrosch has some words of advice.

From the Washington Post:

It is a tale of two trees, one happy, one sad. Both of the crab apples in my garden are laden with white flowers in spring, bear red berries that last into the winter, for the birds’ pleasure, and sport yellow leaves in fall. But one of the trees sports them all too soon, in summer, when the scab fungus catches up with them. Its berries are sparse. The other tree is a vigorous grower with nary a sign of disease. The two are growing in identical plots, with well-amended soil.

Over in the orchard, where the eating apples are, scab is also in evidence. There, the focus is on the fruits. (Sure, you can make jelly from crab apple fruits, but the tiny size of most of those grown for ornament make them fussy to pick.) The Winesaps in particular have exhibited the telltale signs: little round greenish spots that have darkened into the eponymous scabs, as if they were just recovering from chicken pox. The Golden and Roxbury Russets, on the other hand, are largely unblemished, by scab or anything else.

Scab is a very common disease among apple trees. It’s a fungus that attacks in spring, does its work, then overwinters in the leaves and fruits that are shed in fall, until spring rains disperse the spores again. For clear, detailed information about apple scab, consult “The Apple Grower,” by Michael Phillips (Chelsea Green, $40).

Read the whole article here.

 

Related Articles:


Recipe: Winter Root Veggie Potpie

If you have a winter CSA share, then you’re probably poking around for some new ways to use up those winter root veggies. Straight from his newly released cookbook Black Trumpet, Chef Evan Mallett suggests this Winter Root Veggie Potpie. And, we couldn’t agree more. This recipe is just a small selection of the more […] Read More

Fat is NOT the Enemy: Domini Kemp and The Ketogenic Kitchen

Emerging research suggests that a ketogenic diet, in conjunction with conventional treatments, offers new hope for those coping with cancer and other serious disease. Take it from Domini Kemp, who’s personal journey with cancer—detailed below, along with a short video—led her to follow a low-carb, ketogenic diet and the impact it’s had on her health, […] Read More

Happy Holidays from Chelsea Green Publishing!

Today we kick off our Holiday Sale — with 35% off every purchase at our online bookstore. Simply use the code CGS16 at checkout from now until the end of the year. Along with this great discount, we are offering free shipping on any order over $100*. Are there homesteaders or organic gardeners on your […] Read More

Chef Evan Mallett’s New England Thanksgiving Feast

 If you’re looking for something new and different to serve this Thanksgiving – Chef Evan Mallett has some ideas. Straight from his newly released cookbook Black Trumpet, Mallett has selected three dishes that will add some seasonal flavor to your holiday table, especially if you’re in New England. These recipes are just a small selection […] Read More

Sex, Violence, and Figs

They are trees of life and trees of knowledge. They are the fig trees. Fig trees fed our pre-human ancestors, influenced diverse cultures and played key roles in the dawn of civilization. They feature in every major religion, starring alongside Adam and Eve, Krishna and Buddha, Jesus and Muhammad. This is no coincidence – fig […] Read More
Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com