Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

Folks, This Ain’t Normal

Joel Salatin, author, advocate, proprietor of Polyface Farm, and sometimes dubbed “the high priest of the pasture,” has just come out with a new book, Folks, This Ain’t Normal, published by the Hachette Group.

Dan Barber, the chef at Blue Hill has praised the book, saying:

“Joel Salatin might seem like a vision of our agrarian past, but in fact, he’s distinctly modern, looking beyond the conventional toward a new ‘normal’ based on community, ecology, and flavor, too. Salatin’s book is as practical as it is reflective; as necessary as it is radical.”

As Salatin continues his eloquent and rousing crusade on behalf of ecological farming and consumer rights, we’d like to take a moment to remind you of his best-selling barn-full of guides for farmers, which we have been happy to distribute all these years. These books still represent some of the finest information available for food-producers who want to steward a grass-based system of diverse livestock, store carbon in the soil, and sell customers delicious, healthy food.

Pastured Poultry Profits:

A couple working six months per year for 50 hours per week on 20 acres can net $25,000-$30,000 per year with an investment equivalent to the price of one new medium-sized tractor. Seldom has agriculture held out such a plum. In a day when main-line farm experts predict the continued demise of the family farm, the pastured poultry opportunity shines like a beacon in the night, guiding the way to a brighter future.

Everything I Want to do is Illegal:

War Stories from the Local Food Front

Salatin’s expert insight explains why local food is expensive and difficult to find and will illuminate for the reader a deeper understanding of the industrial food complex.

You Can Farm:

The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Start and Succeed in a Farming Enterprise

Starting and succeeding in a farming enterprise.

Family Friendly Farming:

A Multi-Generational Home-Based Business Testament

A well-written, easily read book on raising a family, children, and running a farm for a profitable business.

Holy Cows and Hog Heaven:

The Food Buyer’s Guide to Farm Friendly Food

Holy Cows and Hog Heaven encourages every food buyer to embrace the notion that menus are a conscious decision, creating the next generation’s world one bite at a time.

Salad Bar Beef:

Beef can be lean and good for you when it is not a product of the industrial agriculture machine–Salatin brings us back to small scale family farming and teaches us how to make “salad bar beef.”

The Sheer Ecstasy of Being a Lunatic Farmer:

Foodies and environmentally-minded folks often struggle to understand and articulate the fundamental differences between the farming and food systems they endorse and those promoted by Monsanto and friends. With visceral stories and humor from his own half-century as a lunatic farmer, Salatin contrasts the differences on many levels: practical, spiritual, social, economic, ecological, political, and nutritional.

And finally, here’s a video introducing the new book:


New French edition of The Resilient Farm and Homestead available

Great news for French-speaking fans of Ben Falk’s The Resilient Farm and Homestead: An Innovative Permaculture and Whole Systems Design Approach. The French language translation is now available from Imagine Un Colibri, from French booksellers, and on Amazon.fr. Falk’s book is a technical manual that details the strategies he and his team have developed for […] Read More

How to Make Biochar

Doing some spring cleaning around your property? By making biochar from brush and other hard-to-compost organic material, you can improve soil—it enhances nutrient availability and also enables soil to retain nutrients longer. This excerpt from The New Farmer’s Almanac, Volume 3, explains how to get started. To make biochar right in your garden, start by […] Read More

Generosity as Activism, and Other Homesteading Principles to Live By

“Like everyone I know, we occasionally find ourselves faced with a decision to which there is no obvious answer,” says Ben Hewitt, coauthor of The Nourishing Homestead. “Do we borrow money to build a bigger barn, or do we keep getting by with what we have? Do we spend our meager savings on trees and […] Read More

Pass the Walnut Syrup?

Everyone knows and loves maple syrup, and in some states (like Chelsea Green’s home state of Vermont), it’s big business. However, it’s a widespread myth that maples are the only trees that can be tapped to produce sap, according to Michael Farrell, sugarmaker and director of Cornell University’s Uihlein Forest. Sap can also be collected […] Read More

4 Books for Growing Food in Winter

Don’t let cold weather stop you from producing and enjoying your own food. For many, the coming of winter simply means cultivation moves indoors or under cover. Small farmers, homesteaders, home gardeners, and commercial growers can extend the growing season with techniques outlined in these essential books. There’s no need for urbanites and small-space dwellers […] Read More
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