Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

Fight Global Warming with a Pledge to be Meatless in May (Video)

You might find this surprising, but most of us here at Chelsea Green are not vegetarians. We do have a few veggies and vegans, but the majority of us (including me) eat meat. Of course, we opt for local, grass-fed, antibiotic-free, hormone-free, humanely-treated meat whenever we can, but it’s not always an option—leaving us with only industrialized, packaged, shipped, corn-fed, medicated, abused, hormone’d, and labor-intensive options. (Hardly, gives you the warm fuzzies, eh?) So, in the interest of raising awareness about the huge impact the industrialized meat production has on our health and environment, we’ve decided to put our veggies where our mouth is and cut industrialized meat out of our collective diet for the month of May. We’ve teamed up with the great folks over at YourDailyThread.com to ask you to take the pledge with us. How much of an impact on the environment could industrialized meat production really have, you ask? Here are some truthbombs to explode knowledge into your ecobrain!

Truthbomb: Livestock production accounts for 18 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions—more than all the world’s cars combined!1

traffic_jam.jpgcar_exhaust.jpgparking_lot.jpg

Truthbomb: It takes 40 calories of energy to produce one calorie of industrialized beef.2

slaughter_field.jpgbutcher_knife.jpgcows_tractor.jpg

Truthbomb: Walking uses more fossil fuel than driving—if you get your calories from industrialized red meat.1

people_walking.jpgwalking_beef.jpgwalking_mountains.jpg Surprising, no? When we think about industries that damage the environment, most of us immediately (and rightly) think of oil, coal, transportation, etc. Not many people could accurately name U.S. industrial meat production as one of global warming’s largest contributors. But when one takes into account the chemicals, the grain, the fossil fuels, the medications, the shipping, the storage, the packaging, and the medical aftermath associated with eating a diet full of corn-fed, industrialized meats…it is not hard to see why it is so detrimental to our world.
Note: Local, grass-fed, un-drugged meat is not harmful to your or the environment. If you are lucky enough to have a local farmers that practices healthy meat production, we urge you to support their businesses. If you don’t know of meat producer near you, check out LocalHarvest for a great alternative to industrialized meat.
Cutting industrialized meat out of your diet entirely saves 5,000 lbs of carbon emissions per year. By cutting industrialized meat out of your diet for just the month of May, you’ll be cutting 420 lbs. of CO2 out of your carbon footprint. So please join us and YourDailyThread in taking the Meatless for May pledge. You can do so by “attending” our Facebook Meatless in May event. Below, Tracy and Lauryn explain. If you’re tempted to take the pledge, but don’t know what to eat or where to get it, check out the following books to help you get started. Remember, going veggie for a month is great—going LOCAL veggie for a month is outstanding!
Gaia’s Kitchen Vegetarian Recipes for Community and Family by Julia Ponsonby
Perennial Vegetables From Artichokes to Zuiki Taro, a Gardener’s Guide to Over 100 Delicious, Easy-to-Grow Edibles by Eric Toensmeier
Fresh Food from Small Spaces The Square-Inch Gardener’s Guide to Year-Round Growing, Fermenting, and Sprouting by R. J. Ruppenthal
Sharing the Harvest A Citizen’s Guide to Community Supported Agriculture by Elizabeth Henderson, Robyn Van En
Wild Fermentation The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods by Sandor Katz
Sources:
  1. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
  2. Pimentel, D., & Pimental, M. (2003). Sustainability of meat-based and plant-based diets and the environment. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 78(suppl):660S-663S.


Recipe: Summer Herb Flower Vinegar

Olivia’s mom, Lola, is famous for her potato salad that seems so simple, but has a certain je ne sais quoi—the secret ingredient: chive-flower-infused vinegar. She recalls, “As a child I was enchanted by the apothecary bottles lined up on our kitchen shelves, stuffed with purple pompoms—I just knew there was magic happening inside.”This recipe […] Read More

Learn the Nutritional Secrets to Keeping Healthy Bones

Despite the millions consumers spend on calcium pills and the number of prescriptions for bone loss drugs they fill, worldwide there is an osteoporotic fracture every three seconds.Drugs that claim to prevent or redress bone loss can actually cause bones to crumble and break. Calcium supplements, fortified processed food, and pasteurized dairy don’t work because […] Read More

Food & Drink Sale! Save 35% on all Food & Drink books through August 1st

Here at Chelsea Green Publishing, we believe that it matters where our food comes from and how it is grown because a healthy food system is key to ensuring a resilient, sustainable, and healthy future for all of us. We’ve put ALL ourfood & drink books on sale for 35% off — but hurry it […] Read More

Recipe: Ginger-Apricot Mead

With reader interest in Sandor Ellix Katz’s Ginger Beer recipe, here’s another ginger concoction for summertime sipping: Ginger-Apricot Mead. Jereme Zimmerman, author of Make Mead Like a Viking, shares his recipe below, along with tips on sourcing local honey to make mead. When Jereme was in North Carolina earlier this year to present at the […] Read More

How-To: Foraging for Flavors to Fire Up Your Grill

If you love grilling, you are certain to know that various woods impart delicious smoky flavors to grilled meat, fish, and vegetables. In this excerpt from The New Wildcrafted Cuisine, author and self-described culinary alchemist Pascal Baudar offers foraging tips for finding the best woods and barks to add flavor to anything you toss on […] Read More
Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com