Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

Cool frogs; deadzone oceans

Science newsettes from the Washington Post:
Chinese Torrent Frogs Share Bats’ Ultrasonic Capabilities Not only can a rare Chinese frog sing like a bird, it can also apparently hear like a bat, according to new research…. ***** Fishing Fleets Overexploiting Seas at High Rate, Study Warns Highly mobile fishing fleets are exploiting the sea’s resources at an unsustainable rate, according to a new paper published Friday by more than a dozen international researchers in the journal Science. The paper, which looks at how “roving bandits” swoop in and plunder fisheries at a rapid rate, looks at how some fish populations have collapsed within a matter of years. In Maine, the sea urchin became a popular commodity in Japanese sushi markets in the mid-1980s: After peaking in 1993, the catches declined precipitously….
Peak oil, peak seafood (no disrespect to ocean life forms that don’t think of themselves simply as food, regardless of how delicious they are). Speaking of which, I was very disappointed to see Thai shrimp in the Hanover Co-op yesterday: almost guaranteed to be “farm” shrimp which is bad, bad, bad. Shrimp farms tend to be established through the clearing of mangrove forest. These forests are pretty vital system, protecting shorelines, providing breeding habitat for numerous species, providing living resources for traditional peoples, etc. But they get plowed cuz none of those things count for cash dollars like shrimp. And then, usually, the shrimp farms silt up and shut down after only a few years — so the farmers move on to the next patch of mangrove. Uncool.

Recipe: How to Make the Perfect Pancake

When most people think pancakes, they think breakfast. But for Amy Halloran, breakfast is only the start.Halloran, author of The New Bread Basket, is a self-described pancake connoisseur. From a young age, she was entranced by the magic of bubbly batter rising to fluffy cakes on the griddle. Over time, her love of pancakes developed […] Read More..

Inside the Rise of the Local Grains Movement

Our daily bread. Breaking bread together. Bread and butter. These are all common phrases that reflect bread’s foundational role in our diet and in the building of our civilization. The stored energy of grain first allowed our ancestors to shift from nomadic hunting and gathering to building settled communities—even great cities. So why in an […] Read More..

The Limits to Growth and Greece: Systemic or Financial Collapse?

Could it be that the ongoing Greek collapse is a symptom of the more general collapse that the Limits to Growth model generates for the first two decades of the 21st century? Author Ugo Bardi (Extracted: How the Quest for Mineral Wealth is Plundering the Planet) examines the correlation between what is unfolding between Greece […] Read More..

Economic Development is Broken. Here’s How to Fix It

Economic development today is completely broken. That’s the argument of author Michael Shuman in his new book, The Local Economy Solution. The singular focus on attracting global corporations is not just ineffective but counterproductive, Shuman argues, especially given the huge opportunity costs. Indeed, it’s not far-fetched to suggest that the best way most communities can […] Read More..

A Mini-Festo for Earth Day – Rebuild the Foodshed

For the past month, author Philip Ackerman-Leist has been on a Twitter MiniFesto campaign – each day sending out a new tweet designed to spark conversation and pass along some lessons he learned whilst working on his last book, Rebuilding the Foodshed. You might also know Philip as the author of his memoir Up Tunket […] Read More..