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Chelsea Green Blog

Community Gardens Thriving in Boulder, Colorado

Our friends over at The Daily Camera—Boulder, Colorado’s Finest Publication (except for maybe elephant journal, which is also awesome)—have posted an article about the area’s new soaring interest in community gardening. It seems apartment dwellers with prickly landlords or no room for a kitchen garden are turning to launching, or joining, local community gardens to grow their own organic fruits and vegetables.

From the article:

Shrinking paychecks in a stalled economy, along with a desire for more sustainable, locally grown food and making community connections are fueling a renewed interest in gardening.

Seven million more American households plan to grow their own fruits, vegetables, herbs or berries this year than in 2008, almost a 20 percent increase, according to the National Gardening Association.

Growing Gardens, a nonprofit group that manages about 450 plots at seven community gardens in Boulder and Louisville’s Kerr Community Garden, has a wait list at all its gardens this year.

“We’ve experienced three times the amount of demand than we’ve had before,” said Growing Gardens Executive Director Ramona Clark. “Community gardens get people directly connected to the plants and each other and the earth.”

Read the full article here.

We’ve been saying it all along: growing your own food is healthy for you, the planet, and your budget. Kudos to our friends in Boulder, the Vermont-of-the-West.

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