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Cheesemonger Gordon Edgar Picks the Best Cheeses of 2009

If you’re looking for an expert to put together a list of the top automobiles of the year, you go to a carmonger. We all know that. Want to know which movies of the past 52 weeks are worth a spot in your Netflix queue? Ask a moviemonger. So, logically, when the time comes to procure the finest, the most delectably fresh or distinguishedly aged, the heartiest, the creamiest cheeses in all of cheesedom, you go to—who else?—the cheesemonger.

Note: I may have made up a couple of words for the preceding introduction. Nevertheless…

From the SF Weekly food blog:

2009 is almost over, so the Weekly asked me to do a little cheesemonger reflection upon this past year in cheese. If you love the cheese, a few new cheeses and dairy trends have surfaced that are worth checking out:

1. The New Swiss: Because of changes in Swiss government dairy subsidies, a lot of milk that used to go to Emmenthal and Gruyère is now available for creative cheesemakers. My favorite among the New Swiss is Challerhocker, a cheese with all the amazing sweet, nutty, slightly pungent flavor of a well-aged Gruyère, but with a creamy, semisoft texture (and including those amazing aging crystals). Besides Challerhocker, a plethora of new Swiss cheeses are available in select Bay Area shops: Nidelchas, Scharfer Max, Brebis Rossinière, Selun, Försterkäse, Dallenwiller, and Heublumen, to name just a few.

2. Dunbarton Blue: Made by the Roelli Cheese Company in Shullsburg, Wis., this cheese is basically a beautifully aged farmhouse cheddar with blue veins running throughout. No blue out there compares to this, except for the accidental veining found at times in other traditionally made cheddars (like Neal’s Yard Montgomery or Fiscalini Bandage Wrapped). Sharp and earthy, with a mild- to medium-strength taste of blue.

Read the whole article here.

 

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