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Believeable Satire? Now, That Is Scary

Recently, I posted on this blog an essay, thinly disguised as a news report, entitled “Bush Declares War on Ivory-Billed Woodpecker.” The premise was that our president had placed a $10,000 bounty on the head of each specimen of this magnificent, newly rediscovered creature, thought for 60 years to have been extinct, because he didn’t want to add another animal to the Endangered Species List. The post was, of course, a satire — one of the oldest forms of literature, with a pedigree dating back at least to Aristophanes. Satire has long been a weapon of choice for scribes targeting entrenched, corrupt, criminally belligerent power elites, and it was in this spirit that I invoked the form. One reader, not amused, described my post as “shameful” and “so ridiculous it doesn’t deserve to be in print.” I won’t summon a defense against the common premise that an attitude disagreed with is inherently offensive and better left unexpressed; being human, I know I have felt and spoken similar sentiments many times, and presumably will do so again. The writer added, “I feel sorry for the less educated reader who might very well believe what has been posted.” For starters, the notion that anyone could find credible, on the basis of what he or she knew of the man, that George Bush would try to exterminate a species is a more damning indictment of his character and monstrous environmental record than my post was. How pathetic and frightening that anyone could find such bogus news believable. And this may sound downright baroque, but I cling to the old-fashioned belief that each citizen of a republic has a duty to know what the administration in power — that is, the public servants who hold in temporary stewardship that republic’s governing machinery — are up to. The truth is out there, and I won’t feel sorry for someone whose mind is empty and yet so agile that it can dodge the evidence, on every hand, of the ruthlessness with which the Bush administration is openly — defiantly, even proudly — desecrating the environment, human rights, international law, fiscal responsibility, and on and on and on. (It’s not on too many front burners right now, but I believe the main thing for which posterity will remember George W. Bush is that he was the only president in history to propose a constitutional amendment intended to deny one segment of society rights that are enjoyed by the rest of us.) So — sorry, no; inexpressibly disheartened, yes. To me, a hypothetical citizen so gullible and clueless as to believe my story was true is an accessory after the fact of George Bush’s crimes. In 1729, Irish satirist Jonathan Swift (Gulliver’s Travels) published an essay titled “A Modest Proposal: For Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland From Being a Burden to Their Parents or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Public.” Largely due to negligence on the part of the island’s English occupiers, most of the Irish population was desperately poor, and starvation was systemic and widespread. Swift suggested that the problem could be solved if the Irish would simply eat their children. Fewer mouths to feed, you see, and all the grownups would be fat and happy. ”I have been assured by a very knowing American of my acquaintance in London,” Swift wrote, “that a young healthy child well nursed is at a year old a most delicious, nourishing, and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked, or boiled … ” Much of British society was appalled by Swift’s literary mischief, completely missing his intent: to skewer their own indifference to human suffering. The possibility of someone believing, on the basis of something I wrote, that Bush would try to wipe out an endangered species is a poor reason to get mad at me. It’s a good reason for you to be scared to death — and to weep for the Republic.

Use Systems Thinking to Make Lasting Social Change

What can be done when our best intentions create unintended problems—such as temporary shelters increasing homelessness or food aid accelerating starvation?After decades of helping change-makers in the nonprofit, public, and private sectors address tough social problems, systems-thinking expert David Stroh shares the pioneering framework that both demystifies systems thinking and shows how it can lead […] Read More..

Let’s Make Bernie Sanders a Bestseller!

As the presidential campaign of Bernie Sanders continues to climb in the polls, crushing online fundraising records and frustrating party insiders and pundits along the way, we’re looking to put Bernie’s message on bestseller lists everywhere in time for the national debates this fall!With the second Democratic debate to be held on November 14th in Des Moines, it’s […] Read More..

Bern Baby Bern!

Feel the Bern, now read the Bern. Chelsea Green is bringing out the first major book chronicling the issues being raised by US Senator Bernie Sanders in his campaign for president of the United States. The Essential Bernie Sanders and His Vision for America is the only book that outlines, in Sanders’ own words and […] Read More..

Economic Development is Broken. Here’s How to Fix It

Economic development today is completely broken. That’s the argument of author Michael Shuman in his new book, The Local Economy Solution. The singular focus on attracting global corporations is not just ineffective but counterproductive, Shuman argues, especially given the huge opportunity costs. Indeed, it’s not far-fetched to suggest that the best way most communities can […] Read More..

5 Shareable Strategies for Creating Climate Action

Frustrated about climate change? You’re not alone. Most people in our society find themselves somewhere on the spectrum of depressed about our climate situation to flat-out denying that it exists. In fact, the more information about global warming that piles up, the less we seem to do to combat it. What is the reason for this […] Read More..
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