Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

A More Natural and Greener Way to Garden – Slow Gardening

Listen to author Felder Rushing on Naturally Vibrant Living.

In the pursuit of the perfect lawn and manicured, sometimes uniform shrubs and annuals, not to mention vegetables, could something be getting lost? Could we be gardening in an overly intense or pressured way? Diane Brandon is joined this week by Felder Rushing, a decades-long gardener who writes and speaks about gardening, who is also the author of Slow Gardening – A No-Stress Philosophy for All Senses and Seasons. Mr. Rushing’s approach could allow you to get the health benefits from contact with the earth, as well as the rewards of gardening, without feeling pressured. It should feed your enjoyment of gardening as well!

Praise for Slow Gardening

“Felder’s enjoyment-based approach, which is what I do and teach but didn’t have a name for til now, is sustainable gardening at its most enjoyable—without the usual anxiety over doing something wrong.”

Susan Harris, cofounder, GardenRant and founder, Sustainable-Gardening

“Felder knows that if gardening isn’t fun, it isn’t worth doing. So if ‘power gardening’ has emptied your wallet and sent your blood pressure soaring like a condor on caffeine, give yourself a break. Try Slow Gardening.”
Steve Bender, Southern Living Magazine

We are Farmily: Everyday Life on Sole Food Street Farm

Food is the medium. The message is nourishment in its most elemental and spiritual form.That’s how author Michael Ableman sees the role of Sole Food Street Farm and the food it sells to markets, restaurants, and individuals.In the following excerpt from his new book, Street Farm: Growing Food, Jobs, and Hope on the Urban Frontier, […] Read More

Who Produces More Eggs: Ducks or Chickens?

During our monthlong focus on homesteading in September, we received a number of great questions with several of them centered on … ducks and chickens.Here is one such question that came in via Facebook:“I have read that ducks produce more eggs over a longer lifetime of productivity than chickens, but recently talked with a farmer […] Read More

From Farm-to-Table to Farm-to-Everything

No longer restricted to the elite segments of society, the farm-to-table movement now reaches a wide spectrum of Americans from hospital and office cafeterias to elementary schools and fast-casual restaurants.Nearly a century ago, the idea of “local food” would have seemed perplexing, since virtually all food was local. Today, most of the food consumed in […] Read More

The Three Cs of Farm-to-School

Most people know about the three “R’s” – reading, writing, and arithmetic. But, have you heard about the three “C’s”?If you, or your kid, is at a school that takes part in the Farm-to-School movement, then you may already know about them.October is National Farm-to-School month, and in their book Farm to Table, authors Darryl […] Read More

Homesteading: Highlighting Our Need For Each Other

Homesteading isn’t meant to be a solitary adventure, or done in isolation.Building and living on the independent farmstead takes at least one partner, if not several. That’s the advice of authors Shawn and Beth Dougherty. In their book The Independent Farmstead, The Sow’s Ear model for regenerating the land and growing food covers everything from […] Read More
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